: '68 coupe deville w/ Daytons Questions...



SGFunk68
06-22-11, 07:33 PM
Hi everyone,
new to the forum here. I just bought a '68 coupe deville, fully restored engine, new brakes, and with 20'' dayton wire wheels (on vogue tires).

I've been told the Daytons are too big (since I believe stocks were only 15'') so it causes my tires to rub everytime I make a turn.
I've also been told not to worry about it.
Not quite sure what to do here. Should I be concerned a tire with blow a flat, etc?
Should I have them replaced to the original specs? If so, where would I start this hunt? FYI-I live in Los Angeles.

Lastly,
this is the car I've wanted my entire life and a lot of people have told me not to take it on a road trip because "anything can happen with these old cars". I desperately want to take it on a 500 mile road trip (each way) but I don't work on cars, so in the event of something breaking down, I'd have to take it to a shop.

But why buy the car of my dreams to just let it sit, right?

I'd appreciate your feedback, thanks!

OffThaHorseCEO
06-23-11, 08:07 PM
Hi everyone,
new to the forum here. I just bought a '68 coupe deville, fully restored engine, new brakes, and with 20'' dayton wire wheels (on vogue tires).

I've been told the Daytons are too big (since I believe stocks were only 15'') so it causes my tires to rub everytime I make a turn.
I've also been told not to worry about it.
Not quite sure what to do here. Should I be concerned a tire with blow a flat, etc?
Should I have them replaced to the original specs? If so, where would I start this hunt? FYI-I live in Los Angeles.

Lastly,
this is the car I've wanted my entire life and a lot of people have told me not to take it on a road trip because "anything can happen with these old cars". I desperately want to take it on a 500 mile road trip (each way) but I don't work on cars, so in the event of something breaking down, I'd have to take it to a shop.

But why buy the car of my dreams to just let it sit, right?

I'd appreciate your feedback, thanks!

1) find out what the original tire size was. find out what the current tire size is then use this calculator to adjust accordingly. http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html
T (http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html)he size of the wheel doesnt exactly matter as long as the wheel/tire package are as close to factory as possible. If its not the same overall size, its not the end of the world either, negative side effects can include the speedometer being out of whack, rough ride, affected fuel economy and tires rubbing the inner or outer fender well. the last part can be dangerous if its rubbing badly enough. the tire will eventually wear thin and you may experience a blow out.

2) learn about your car. i mean really try to learn as much as you can about it. i dont mean trivia and historical facts. i mean component locations and orientation. how to repair components. what components are known to fail and how to fix them etc etc etc. Try to start doing as much work as you can on your own, or if you take it to a shop, keep a log of everything thats been done. This way, if you ever decide to take the car on a road trip, you will know what SHOULDNT fail. If you start doing stuff yourself, you will be better equipped IF/WHEN something does fail.

Wendy-J
07-12-11, 09:39 PM
This is late in coming, but then, I'm new to the forum. However, my advice should prove worth while to all who own older dream cars.

I've owned several vehicles that could be called classic cars and even antique cars in my day. This bit of advice has saved me more than once, even with a modern current car.

You said the engine was rebuilt. That doesn't mean the water pump, alternator, starter, etc...have been redone. It just means the engine was redone. That means the crank, cam, connecting rods, wrist pins, rings, bearings, seals, gaskets etc.... Without seeing the invoice for the rebuild, I couldn't tell you what parts that hang off your dream machine's engine were rebuilt.

The most common -- key word being common -- elements to fail on a trip are the belts and hoses. That isn't to say other parts don't go. I've been left stranded by water pumps, fuel pumps -- yours is mechanical and bolted to the block -- alternators, starters and even a transmission once.

Given the age of the vehicle, I'd see about laying in a supply of the most common replacement parts now. You might have to do what I did when I owned a 1965 Rambler Classic 770 and then the 550. One had a 287 V8, the other a straight six. I bought replacement parts that were little more than cores, then sent them out to be rebuilt -- the parts were no longer available elsewhere. However, when I needed the parts, I had them on the shelf -- or trunk -- waiting to put them in.

You might still be able to get radiator hoses and belts. However, most highway roadside shops do not carry your belts and hoses. They carry the most common belts and hoses. These are what tend to go on a road trip and leave you stuck -- yes, even when new. Keeping a set is wise. However, you need to remember they'll go bad with age. In seven years, they might work to get you home, but they'll be no good to use for an extended period. They'll fail early.

With an antique car, purchasing a water pump, starter and alternator to keep in reserve for emergencies is just common sense. Larger, OLDER parts houses might still have one or two sitting around waiting for you to need the parts. Roadside repair shops generally do not.

Should you go on your trip? Of course! Just learn how to do the most basic of your own repairs and keep a few of the more basic spare parts in the trunk of your car.

Tires:
The tire size was probably a GR-78-15 or an LR-78-15 assuming radials. You'll want 225/75-R-15 or 235/75-R-15 tires.

Enjoy your dream. Just do it wisely.

Wendy.

Wendy-J
07-12-11, 10:18 PM
A word of advice in tires.

They should NEVER rub. EVER.
Rubbing tires means something's wrong.
If you go over a bump and you bottom out, they'll probably rub in the wheel well. However, that isn't what you described. It sounds like you're running tires and rims that are much too big for the car.

Back when your car was new, the tires were not measured in millimetres -- well, they might have been, but the tire sizes did not reflect it as blatantly.
Umm, as far as I can REMEMBER, you have to realise I'm really reaching back into the grey matter, the tire sizes were as follows.

G width tires = 215s
H width tires = 225s
L width tires = 235s Or were those the 255s? Either should work for you.

Wendy.

Wendy-J
07-12-11, 10:18 PM
I managed a duplicate post. Mea Culpa. Gomen Nasai. Erm... Sorry.

Wendy.

dmodest
11-29-11, 12:07 AM
I have a 1970 Deville , with the same rims and tires and also have the same problem with the rubbing. What did you do to correct that problem? I currently do not know a fix for it.