: What happened to punctuation?



ga_etc
05-22-11, 01:25 AM
Seriously.

I've been noticing this for a while now. Years, actually. Fewer and fewer people are actually bothering to use punctuation. Not even improper punctuation, just none at all. It's most apparent with the younger generation. I honestly think texting is to blame. Everyone is so caught up in the text shorthand form of communication that when they get online those habits naturally carry over. It's obvious on any site that allows people to comment or directly interact with one another. It's getting ridiculous.

Having a learning disability is one thing, but 99% of the people who type like that are just too lazy to bother to hit an extra key.

Am I the only one who has noticed this loss in communication skills?

gary88
05-22-11, 01:27 AM
i dont know what your talking about

drewsdeville
05-22-11, 01:28 AM
i dont no wut u r talkin bout noob this is how i talk so have a nice day bro

cadillac kevin
05-22-11, 01:33 AM
I always have and even use correct spelling and punctuation when I text message someone (which often requires more than 1 message to get my point across.) I guess it all comes down to the perceived saving of time by not using correct punctuation and shortening words (2 gt str8 2 da pt.) Because as everyone knows that 1/2 a second I save but not writing a few letters is so important because it lets me say what I want to say just that much faster. I think we all need to slow down, take a deep breath, and chill. Constantly having to go everywhere and being connected to everybody every waking (and sleeping) minute of the day is very stressful and tiring.

ga_etc
05-22-11, 01:39 AM
The point of this is not to single out people on this site. This is a general observation from being online. I see it on here, on Facebook, on YouTube, etc. I was just wondering if it stood out to anyone else or if it has gotten to the point that it's so commonplace we just overlook it and continue on?

drewsdeville
05-22-11, 01:42 AM
In real life, it does still stand out to me. On the internet, I've grown immune to it and overlook it for the most part.

Kev
05-22-11, 01:57 AM
Writing habits can make quite a difference on how a message is received. I've seen large posts that may have interesting, even valuable content but, because the format is minimal, no paragraphs or punctuation it becomes laborious to read. I tend to pass on them.

Aron9000
05-22-11, 02:55 AM
Writing habits can make quite a difference on how a message is received. I've seen large posts that may have interesting, even valuable content but, because the format is minimal, no paragraphs or punctuation it becomes laborious to read. I tend to pass on them.

:werd:

Ranger
05-22-11, 11:29 AM
I have passed on responding to posts that where nothing more than a long, misspelled, incomprehensible run on sentence.

Rolex
05-22-11, 01:16 PM
Text messaging and "internet speak" have given rise to a whole new ebonics-esque language popular with younger people, and adopted by gen-xers to a large degree. When chatting via text messaging and even on internet forums, it's tolerable. When someone actually has something genuine to try to explain or relay, their poor sentence structure and inability to form paragraphs makes reading their post intolerable for some. JMHO

jordan00escalade
05-22-11, 01:24 PM
I never really sat down and thought about it, but you are right. Interesting if you actually think about it.

stoveguyy
05-22-11, 01:50 PM
how about misspelled words? i go to a grand prix website and its all grunts and single syllable words. i assume that is due to the average age of 19 and not graduating from high school.

dkozloski
05-22-11, 02:07 PM
There was a time when people prided themselves on being "wordsmiths". Now anything goes and it's your fault if you can't figure out what the hell they are trying to say.

A little research reveals that the literacy rate in the U. S. in the middle 1800s was in the high 90s. Now in the big cities it barely reaches 50%.

Texting has probably done more to further the most basic reading and writing skills of the young in this country that any other influence. If it wasn't for texting they wouldn't be able to communicate with the written word at all.

jayoldschool
05-22-11, 02:14 PM
MSN, then texting, are what happened to punctuation. Being a teacher, it is amazing to me the work that gets turned in. No lie, I had a paper that ended with "so, um, yeah."

I try to explain to my students that the way that they write will be the first impression of their intelligence when someone reads something they have written. It is unfortunate that many people that use forums on the internet do not realize (or care) about that.

u no wut i mean?

orconn
05-22-11, 03:34 PM
Both my son and daughter-in-law, both in their early thirties, and both teaching law courses at William and Mary Law School, have made communication in full sentences, with correct grammar, the rule for their students. So many of the students were sending them messages written in the "texting" format that not only were their messages lacking in the verbal precision desired in the legal profession, but, in many cases, were incomprehensible as well. This rule was met by a uproar of complaint from the aspiring lawyers in their classes. The fact that written language skills are a necessity for success in the legal profession did not register with the current crop of law students at a relatively prestigious (and selective) American law school leads one to wonder what the future may hold for precise, coherent communication in this country!

ThumperPup
05-22-11, 05:12 PM
well i don't know about others and im the last one that should ever judge someone on there spelling grammar or punctuation unless its just joking around

how ever i know the reason i don't use it properly is because i was not taken the time i with to be taught how to yous it what i know is what i have picked up on my own
and sometime they might be there and sometimes they might not
more likely to be there if spell check decides to pick up on them every now and then

Jesda
05-22-11, 05:43 PM
Its a nuisance I've learned to live with, grudgingly. The purpose of punctuation, spelling, and grammar conventions is to give us a universal code for communication. If you leave out the periods, commas, quotation marks, and question marks, you might fail to convey your point.

Destroyer
05-22-11, 09:17 PM
I never really sat down and thought about it, but you are right. Interesting if you actually think about it.I actually thought about it and it didn't generate any interest. Even after several hours, sorry. :histeric:

ga_etc
05-22-11, 09:21 PM
Its a nuisance I've learned to live with, grudgingly. The purpose of punctuation, spelling, and grammar conventions is to give us a universal code for communication. If you leave out the periods, commas, quotation marks, and question marks, you might fail to convey your point.

Exactly. I couldn't have said it better myself.

I know I have a tendency to type exactly as the thought comes to mind. Those of you who have met me in person, or have talked to me on the phone, probably noticed that. I type and speak with the same phrasing. Even with punctuation I still feel as though my thoughts aren't coming across as intended from time to time online. When I do have the feeling that I'm being interpreted the wrong way it bothers me. I know that it's easy to not think about what you post online floating in space for the rest of time, and how it reflects on you as a person, but the the extremes some people go to just boggle my mind.

Stingroo
05-22-11, 10:04 PM
I type, speak, and write in the same manner. Like Austin said, anyone here who has spoken to me on the phone or met me in person will know this. I actually enjoy using obscure words and phrases. It tickles my fancy. I don't do it to sound smarter than anyone else, or to make myself feel superior in any way, it's just something I do. It's the reason I'm an English major. It's fun to me. I love learning new words. No joke, that's my crack.

I despise people who can't type. I'll be honest: I judge intelligence from the way people communicate. That goes for the Internet and in person. I correct people's grammar, and I don't give a damn if it irritates them. It's something that should be known. It isn't even taught in school anymore other than the most basic rules.

Irritating.

I'll get off my soap box now. :lol:

Jesda
05-22-11, 10:14 PM
I exclusively use caps when I'm drunk.

ThumperPup
05-22-11, 10:25 PM
I exclusively use caps when I'm drunk.

Don't play with Cap Gun's when you are drunk lol

EChas3
05-22-11, 10:39 PM
well i don't know about others and im the last one that should ever judge someone on there spelling grammar or punctuation unless its just joking around

how ever i know the reason i don't use it properly is because i was not taken the time i with to be taught how to yous it what i know is what i have picked up on my own
and sometime they might be there and sometimes they might not
more likely to be there if spell check decides to pick up on them every now and then

Pup, I'm not surprised.

In this world you should expect to be judged by others based on every feature you can control. To wish otherwise is to ignore human nature.

When first seeing a person, most people will look at their appearance, choice of attire and demeanor and if any are inappropriate to the situation, will notice. Is this person out of place?

A person's speech, word choice, grammer and manners suggests their education and experience. A person's handwriting, spelling and punctuation reflects their intellegence.

This is the real world. Everyone is constantly being judged by everyone else.

ThumperPup
05-22-11, 10:41 PM
yeah it is the real world and if it was a perfect world then well my wish for peace on earth would have come long time ago LOL

Ranger
05-22-11, 10:54 PM
If you leave out the periods, commas, quotation marks, and question marks, you might fail to convey your point.
Kind of like the difference between "Helping your uncle Jack, off a horse" and "Helping your uncle jack off a horse"?

Stingroo
05-23-11, 12:26 AM
"Let's eat, Grandma!" or "Let's eat Grandma!"

Punctuation saves lives.

Kev
05-23-11, 12:56 AM
Both my son and daughter-in-law, both in their early thirties, and both teaching law courses at William and Mary Law School, have made communication in full sentences, with correct grammar, the rule for their students. So many of the students were sending them messages written in the "texting" format that not only were their messages lacking in the verbal precision desired in the legal profession, but, in many cases, were incomprehensible as well. This rule was met by a uproar of complaint from the aspiring lawyers in their classes. The fact that written language skills are a necessity for success in the legal profession did not register with the current crop of law students at a relatively prestigious (and selective) American law school leads one to wonder what the future may hold for precise, coherent communication in this country!I can imagine the carnage of an old school shark litigating a contract composed by one of these new, illiterate barristers......

Kev
05-23-11, 01:00 AM
..... I actually enjoy using obscure words and phrases. It tickles my fancy. ......My mother admitted to me that when she gets bored, with nothing else available, she reads the dictionary, searching for new and interesting words to add to her vocabulary.

Stingroo
05-23-11, 01:27 AM
Well, I think that qualifies as awesome.

gdwriter
05-23-11, 01:52 AM
I teach business communication. Some of my students wouldn't know a comma if it smacked them in the face. I grade accordingly.

Playdrv4me
05-23-11, 02:06 AM
Its a nuisance I've learned to live with, grudgingly.

It's

'Sup.

Stingroo
05-23-11, 09:08 AM
It's

'Sup.

'Sup?


:yup:

ThumperPup
05-23-11, 10:24 AM
No you got to add the Head bob in with it whyll your saying it
so its (head Bob) or (Nod) Sup Dog ?

The Tony Show
05-23-11, 11:14 AM
I agree that it reflects poorly on the writer's intelligence. I get business emails all the time that I would swear are from a non-English speaker- something to the extent of "i interest in you product, what price i can have for this?" Then I meet the person face to face, and they're a retired business person and very well spoken.

Honestly, it baffles me. I literally have to force myself to write an unintelligible sentence. If you can speak intelligently and put a sentence together, how on Earth does that get lost in the transition to a keyboard?

Submariner409
05-23-11, 01:24 PM
Am I the only one who has noticed this loss in communication skills?

No, not at all. Throughout CF there are occasional references to the sad state of affairs with the King's English..............and the butchery is not only sloppy and uneducated-looking, it detracts from the intelligibility of the question or answer.

but,like,no,man i wont pearsist in leeving bad werds on the intarnet.somtimes i reed an type so fast it just dosent leeve time for punchtation becaus i want to be the first poaster in the qwueston thred.

Submariner409
05-23-11, 01:28 PM
Well, I think that qualifies as awesome.

"awesome" in the pure dictionary sense of the word or "awesome, man" in today's bastardized English ? :stirpot:

orconn
05-23-11, 01:29 PM
I agree that it reflects poorly on the writer's intelligence. I get business emails all the time that I would swear are from a non-English speaker- something to the extent of "i interest in you product, what price i can have for this?" Then I meet the person face to face, and they're a retired business person and very well spoken.

Honestly, it baffles me. I literally have to force myself to write an unintelligible sentence. If you can speak intelligently and put a sentence together, how on Earth does that get lost in the transition to a keyboard?

A lot of us old pharts can't type. I realize that with the advent of the PC most young folks are more than adequate typist but many of my generation never learned to type well; we had secretaries who carried out that chore for us.

During my years in the intelligence community we did all our own typing (because of security clearance levels personnel access was very limited thus no clerical staff).The U.S. government spent two weeks trying to teach me to touch type with only minimal success. In the intelligence organization where i was employed our typewriters only had capital letters, because most all of our communication was over encrypted teletype which didn't allow for lower case letters. I don't think that I have recovered from my "capital letters" only period, remaining lower case impaired to the present time.

ThumperPup
05-23-11, 01:31 PM
something els that should be said id think is

If your not willing to double and tripple check your own Punctuation and Grammar to make sure its perfect or if you don't go back to proofe read it latter to edit it and correct it then you have no business mentioning anything about someone else's Grammar or Punctuation

Submariner409
05-23-11, 01:34 PM
(communications) typewriters only had capital letters, because most all of our communication was over encrypted teletype which didn't allow for lower case letters.

Same for the diesel subs and early fast attacks, before the advent of the IBM Selectric typewriter.

Quote italics ^^^ mine.

Lord Cadillac
05-23-11, 03:41 PM
I don't have time to read the whole thread but I WILL say that I use proper grammar to the best of my ability (not perfect). However, I get the feeling people think I'm crazy for doing so - especially when sending text messages. I do believe it's considered a little - strange - when you use proper grammar in texts...

Stingroo
05-23-11, 03:43 PM
I actually like that. I do the same thing. :lol:

Lord Cadillac
05-23-11, 03:51 PM
Then you're doing it right. :)


I actually like that. I do the same thing. :lol:

Kev
05-23-11, 04:25 PM
I don't have time to read the whole thread but I WILL say that I use proper grammar to the best of my ability (not perfect). However, I get the feeling people think I'm crazy for doing so - especially when sending text messages. I do believe it's considered a little - strange - when you use proper grammar in texts...It could be considered a sign of respect, for one's self as well as those for whom the message is intended. Like receiving a hand written note (with good penmanship) from someone. They've taken the time to do it right.

Stingroo
05-23-11, 05:28 PM
I have atrocious handwriting. I accept that fact, though.

Submariner409
05-23-11, 05:36 PM
I have atrocious handwriting. I accept that fact, though.

Hah !!! Being left-handed without the handwriting "left hook"...... it's a wonder anyone can decipher my chicken scratches. One of my sisters however, is one of those people whose penmanship is a disgusting, textbook perfect example of the art. I hate her guts.:devil:

ThumperPup
05-23-11, 05:53 PM
I get the feeling people think I'm crazy for doing so - especially when sending text messages. I do believe it's considered a little - strange - when you use proper grammar in texts...

hey now texting and proper grammar thats about the only time you can guarantee to see me typing and read and understand what is on the other end LOL

got to love the phone it auto corrects everything lol

Stingroo
05-23-11, 05:55 PM
I'm left-handed too!

Oddity though: my father is also left-handed and has nearly perfect handwritnig that borders on caligraphy. I am jealous.

OffThaHorseCEO
05-23-11, 07:30 PM
im also left handed without the hook. i have to write reeeaaallllly slow for my handwriting to look good. i cant stand people who can write at the speed of light and still have it come out looking nice.

As far as the topic at hand, i have a bigger issue with people disregard for proper spelling. On an internet forum its not as bad because its just an internet forum.

We we're dropping off some old clothes at the salvation army "dumpster" a while back and saw a bunch of cardboard boxes around it, neatly packed taped and had a printing company logo on it. Due to my uncontrollable curiosity, i opened a box and saw it was full of white t-shirts with a logo on the back and a slogan on the breast. They both read as follows

Logo: Old Freinds Pub & Grille
Slogan: Where Old Freinds Go To Meet New Freinds

I can assume assume the rest of the boxes were full of these shirts as well. Spell-check and proofreading would have benefited both parties in this situation (the customer and the printer)

drewsdeville
05-23-11, 10:52 PM
I'm also part of the left handed club. It doesn't matter how nice my handwriting is: after dragging my left hand across all of my left-to-right handwriting, it looks like a smeared up mess anyway (depending on the writing utensil).