: fleetwood or fleetwood 60 special ???



steck
05-12-11, 08:10 PM
whats the difference,,,


i'm ordering parts and always asked that...


i'm guessing most are the same anyway, but would be good to know !


(1973)

sven914
05-12-11, 09:19 PM
The Sixty Special is the chassis used for the Fleetwood sedan. The name was first used in 1940 to denote Cadillac's series 60 platform, which carried a unique Fleetwood body. After 1940, until 1976, all Fleetwood (non-limousine) sedans are either Fleetwood Sixty Specials or Fleetwood Sixty Special Broughams.

CBodyFan
05-13-11, 12:25 AM
As an interesting aside there was much speculation as to whether the 1975 Seville would be sold as a Cadillac series or a Fleetwood series. After the war and up through the 1975 model year all standard-size Cadillacs (series 61, 62, Calais, & DeVille) were grouped together by GM as simply Cadillacs, in much the same way as "Buick" or "Chevrolet", when used alone, referred to the full-size models. The "special" models were in the Fleetwood series (60 Special, Brougham, Seventy-Five and Eldorado). When the Seville was released in the spring of 75 as a 1976 model it was listed as its own, unique line. It is a naming convention that people have a hard time understanding now but made perfect sense prior to 1980.

For 1979 the Eldorado left the Fleetwood series. GM further diluted model names when, for 1985, there were FWD and RWD Fleetwoods.

For those you old enough to remember the first down-sized cars from GM the Impala and Caprice were referred to as "The New Chevrolet" because GM used Chevrolet as both a divisional/make name and a line designation. Up until 1979 Cevrolet ran full-line commericials advertising their cars as Chevrolets, Malibus, Monte Carlos, Camaros with Chevrolet used to denote the full-size line.

The 94-96 Impala SS was actually a Caprice Classic subseries marketed as a model, but not technically a model in its own right. GM issued a dealer book explaining this.

HartfordGuy
05-13-11, 09:29 AM
whats the difference,,,


i'm ordering parts and always asked that...


i'm guessing most are the same anyway, but would be good to know !


(1973)

regarding the 1973 model year... there is no difference.

The sixty special name was quietly being dropped after 1970. From 71 on there was only one Fleetwood Brougham. So for ordering parts on a 73 it doesn't matter. The only difference would be some interior and exterior trim if the 73 had the optional d'elegance package. But for mechanical or body parts all 73 Fleetwood Broughams / sixty special are the same. Just make sure they don't mean Fleetwood series 75!

steck
05-13-11, 10:29 AM
thx guys

Bro-Ham
05-13-11, 12:04 PM
The Sixty Special is the chassis used for the Fleetwood sedan. The name was first used in 1940 to denote Cadillac's series 60 platform, which carried a unique Fleetwood body. After 1940, until 1976, all Fleetwood (non-limousine) sedans are either Fleetwood Sixty Specials or Fleetwood Sixty Special Broughams.

FYI, Fleetwood Sixty Special was introduced for 1938 model year, for the first time Cadillac made a sleek and stylish car in a more manageable personal luxury car size for the increasing number of affluent post depression owner/drivers. Previously the prestigious Cadillac models were limousine body styles which were quickly becoming less popular since not as many folks were willing or able to keep a chaufeur on retainer.

I just checked www.rockauto.com and noticed separate designations for 1973 Fleetwoods: Fleetwood, Fleetwood 60 Special, and Fleetwood 75. I suspect Fleetwood 60 Special is appropriate for the Fleetwood Brougham, is the singular "Fleetwood" perhaps for professional cars like ambulances and hearses?

:)

sven914
05-13-11, 01:17 PM
It was 1939. In '38, the Series 60 was divided between two wheel bases; 124in and 127in. The 127 inch wheel base was used for the Series 60 (Special) Touring Sedan. In '39, the 124in bodies were moved to a 126 wheelbase, which was called the Series 61. The 127 inch chassis was officially remained, "Series Sixty Special".

So technically, you are right that the 60 Special name was first used in 1938, but it was just a name badge; it was no more a Sixty Special than the '93 version was. 1939 was when the Sixty Special became its own separate series.

Bro-Ham
05-13-11, 02:08 PM
Sven, don't doubt me. 1938 was the first year of the famous Bill Mitchell styled, rounded center pillared, non-running boarded, exclusive, trendsetting, famous, and hugely popular Fleetwood Sixty Special. :)

77CDV
05-13-11, 03:17 PM
Dave and Sven are both right. The Sixty Special was introduced in 1938. However, it did not become a Fleetwood model until 1940, when it adopted Fleetwood bodies in place of the earlier two years' Fisher bodies. The Fleetwood Sixty Special as a stand alone model disappeared after the 1970 model year. The Sixty Special name then dwindled away until it disappeared competely after the 1974 model year. (Source: Terry Wenger, "Something Special, Parts 1 and 2", The Self-Starter, June and July, 2010, issues). It came back in 1987 as a stretched version of the FWD Fleetwood, and remained until 1993, when it was a stand-alone model for one year, and called simply "Sixty Special". The Fleetwood name was transfered back to the newly-revised RWD cars, previously known simply as Broughams, having been stripped of the Fleetwood name in mid-1985. After 1993, the Sixty Special disappeared again. Is everyone thoroughly confused yet? Excellent!

So, for 1973, the base model is technically a Fleetwood Sixty Special Brougham, with the upscale model being the Brougham d'Elegance. The only difference between them is interior trim.