: CNN - Rust cars that could be worth millions



drewsdeville
05-10-11, 12:31 PM
Nifty link with pictures:

http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/autos/1105/gallery.barn_finds/index.html

Destroyer
05-10-11, 09:09 PM
I really enjoyed that link, thanks for posting it. I didn't think many of these "barn finds" were still out there. I wonder what cars built over the last 20 years will qualify as "barn finds". Cool stuff. :thumbsup:

Aron9000
05-11-11, 01:42 AM
^ Barn finds in the future:

Buick Grand Nationals and Turbo Regals
2nd gen Trans Am, those late 70's models have really risen in value the past few years
2003-2004 Mustang Cobras
Anything Lamborghini
1996 Impala SS
Dodge Viper
BMW M models

Submariner409
05-11-11, 09:18 AM
There was a stunning barn find right here on Kent Island a few years ago - a mint 1956 Ford Crown Victoria in blue and white.

Stingroo
05-11-11, 09:26 AM
^ Barn finds in the future:

Buick Grand Nationals and Turbo Regals
2nd gen Trans Am, those late 70's models have really risen in value the past few years
2003-2004 Mustang Cobras
Anything Lamborghini
1996 Impala SS
Dodge Viper
BMW M models

I'll add to this list:

Split Bumper Camaros
Monte Carlo SS Aerocoupe/Pontiac 2+2
Pontiac GTO/G8 (Watch. They'll be hidden out there and people will want them.)

ThumperPup
05-11-11, 10:55 AM
^ Barn finds in the future:

Buick Grand Nationals and Turbo Regals
2nd gen Trans Am, those late 70's models have really risen in value the past few years
2003-2004 Mustang Cobras
Anything Lamborghini
1996 Impala SS
Dodge Viper
BMW M models


I have always wanted a Buick Grand Nation (( GNX)) those are hot
marshal goldman auto sales and leasing my dad deals with over here had one they called me up they knew some years back i was looking for one they took one in on trade and asked if i was intrested i wish i had the money for that but without a job or a way to recoupe the money i was not going to liquidate some funds just to get the car
but i did get to go in and take it out for a spin oh dang i loved that one of the guys who lived on the corner of my Block had one when i was younger and we used to go for rides in it untill the Fed's came in and took it from him with alot more stuff also lol
but i really want that car it had 13k on it OMG it was awesome one day i will have one of those plus a 1968 GT500 Convertible a 1970 Cuda Convertible or a coupe AAR
one day i tell you i will

ThumperPup
05-11-11, 10:57 AM
I think you can also ad a 1993-1998 Mark Viii's to that list also in about 20 or 30 years

stoveguyy
05-13-11, 11:59 AM
dad grew up about 75 miles NW of new york. worked at small garage in 1950 or so. used to service a dusenberg for rich old widow. got to drive it a bit after he did oil changes and stuff. always kept an eye on it but it eventually moved on. probably in some collection now.

orconn
05-13-11, 12:16 PM
I will bet there are plenty of "barn finds" out their just waiting to be discovered. I can remember in my neighborhood in L.A. seeing great old cars under sheets sitting in garages with their owners unwilling to sell. I'd bet these cars were forgotten as their owners entered their twilight years and are still sitttin their waiting for their owners to pass on and the heirs to discover them as dusty, decaying hulks ..... worth a lot to somebody!

ThumperPup
05-13-11, 03:26 PM
dad grew up about 75 miles NW of new york. worked at small garage in 1950 or so. used to service a dusenberg for rich old widow. got to drive it a bit after he did oil changes and stuff. always kept an eye on it but it eventually moved on. probably in some collection now.

oh i just love those cars
i got pictures in the old scrap books somewhere of my grandfather sitting in a 34 - 4 door convertible dusenberg
those things wow i looked up one ones years back they where running like 1.2 mill for it

ThumperPup
05-13-11, 03:27 PM
I will bet there are plenty of "barn finds" out their just waiting to be discovered. I can remember in my neighborhood in L.A. seeing great old cars under sheets sitting in garages with their owners unwilling to sell. I'd bet these cars were forgotten as their owners entered their twilight years and are still sitttin their waiting for their owners to pass on and the heirs to discover them as dusty, decaying hulks ..... worth a lot to somebody!

it;'s just ashame when that happens every now and then and there are no family to claim or no will made out and the gov gets them all that just bites

LAYGO
05-13-11, 03:39 PM
^ Barn finds in the future:
...
1996 Impala SS
...


As a 1996 owner that's about to park one for a long time, i hope so! ;)

BUT . . . according to this guy, they will too:
http://www.mcsmk8.com/96-IMPALA/96-IMPALA.HTM

But . . . according to Impala guys talking about making them "museum pieces", they won't:
http://www.impalassforum.com/vBulletin/showthread.php?t=259139

Bottom line, is now is time to get in cheap in an SS. You can find a decent one for $4000 with moderate miles.

I paid $19,500 for mine when it was 5 years old with 29k on the clock. I figured the value would hold, but it hasn't . . .

Also, my V has made my SS obsolete. I always said I'd never sell my SS, but I don't think I will enjoy driving the SS anymore! I won't sell it, but probably because I can't the value I have in it!

ThumperPup
05-13-11, 04:13 PM
i could never understand what it is that eveyrone loves about impala's so much SS or none SS
what is it ?
i know what the meanings of them are so not asking that

but what is it that everyone seens in an Impala
to me they are just rental car's i guess thats how i see them

LAYGO
05-13-11, 04:25 PM
i could never understand what it is that eveyrone loves about impala's so much SS or none SS
what is it ?
i know what the meanings of them are so not asking that

but what is it that everyone seens in an Impala
to me they are just rental car's i guess thats how i see them

For the record, we're talking about the 1994 - 1996 Impala SS. And anyone in the SS community will tell you, everything after 1996 is NOT a real SS (wrong wheel drive, looks like a Camry, etc).

Also, the CTS-V/STS-V can be seen as "lineage" to the '94-'96 SS because of the "Corvette drivetrain in a sedan" (RWD, V8, lots of HP). At least that's how I look at it.

And I have not ever seen an B body Impala SS as a rental. Maybe the 8th or 9th gen W (or WImpala as it's known) as a rental, but never a B.

Stingroo
05-13-11, 05:58 PM
What he said. ^

ThumperPup
05-13-11, 06:14 PM
to each there own love in car's
just as some don't understand how i can love lincolns so much
the same goes for you and your Impala SS
i don't understand it but its what you like that counts for you

drewsdeville
05-13-11, 06:24 PM
No doubt most of the cars mentioned will increase in value to some degree as the years go on. However, none of them stick out as million dollar cars, to me.

Most of them already have a following, which means there are plenty that are kept up and cared for. There will be most likely many to choose from in the future if someone was seeking one of those.

The million dollar cars always seem to be those forgotten models that never got any attention until they aged enough that they became incredibly unique most had disappeared. Impala SS, Grand National, etc are far from forgotten. Most of us could find mint examples somewhere nearby with little effort.

ThumperPup
05-13-11, 06:30 PM
i think out of all the cars mentioned here the only one that is and will stay up in the million's is going to be the dusenberg

Stingroo
05-13-11, 07:24 PM
*crosses fingers for million dollar wagons*


I wish. :lol:

The real problem is the fact that production of modern cars is almost so high it'll take FOREVER for them to become rare.

orconn
05-13-11, 07:48 PM
Surprisingly Jaguar E-type roadsters and coupes have still not appreciated to their full potential as relatively low volume high performance sports or GT car of the sixties. The prices these cars bring after restoration are still far below the cost of that restoration. "Barn finds" of good rust free examples of series I and 1 1/2 cars (the most desirable of E-type) can still be had for around $10,000. There are also derelict E-types out there that have rusted to the point of being only salvageable at greatly cost.

I think that there are still good rust free E-types to be found and that in the coming years these cars will appreciate to prices more in line with their automotive significance.

DouglasJRizzo
05-16-11, 11:44 PM
My 67 and 71 Thunderbirds were barn finds. The 67 a one owner car with but 70k on it, the 71, an "N-code" 429 powered bird with 43k on and only two owners.

My 75 hearse wasn't a barn find, but a carriage house find with 16k on it. Ditto for the 74 hearse with 11k on it.

ThumperPup
05-17-11, 12:02 AM
more power to you i could not ride in a car or vehicle that ones had a dead body in it thats just to creapy for me
i don't like ambulances because of that
unless im forced into one not going

Stingroo
05-17-11, 12:06 AM
Hearses are badass. I'd love to own one someday.

ThumperPup
05-17-11, 12:08 AM
i bet you would love to date abby from NCIS also
your not alone so would i lol aslong as she leaves her hears at home lol

Stingroo
05-17-11, 12:17 AM
Had to google.

I'd pass.

DouglasJRizzo
05-17-11, 08:09 AM
I've loved hearses ever since I was a kid. They're so unique. The fact that it transported the dearly departed never really bothered me that much. all three of mine were heading to the crusher, something that, if they were any other model, wouldn't have happened. I love them.

I love the Thunderbirds as well, being unique and special vehicles.

Of course, the Eldorado Convertible will always be the car to own for me. Someday..

Abby from NCIS? I find her beautiful. Quite frankly, the goth getups she wears on the show, even tho part of her character, detract from her appearance.

DouglasJRizzo
05-17-11, 08:13 AM
Surprisingly Jaguar E-type roadsters and coupes have still not appreciated to their full potential as relatively low volume high performance sports or GT car of the sixties. The prices these cars bring after restoration are still far below the cost of that restoration. "Barn finds" of good rust free examples of series I and 1 1/2 cars (the most desirable of E-type) can still be had for around $10,000. There are also derelict E-types out there that have rusted to the point of being only salvageable at greatly cost.

I think that there are still good rust free E-types to be found and that in the coming years these cars will appreciate to prices more in line with their automotive significance.


There was a spike in E type prices a few years ago, when everybody had to have a 73 or 74 V-12 version. that lasted a little while then crapped out fast. Many, hastily done and poor quality restorations can be found. The E has a great many attributes that give it collectability. But the coupe's "giraffe carrier" roofline (someone else's term not mine) and the corrosion problems don't help it at all.

ThumperPup
05-17-11, 09:34 AM
Had to google.

I'd pass.

oh come on man she drives a Hears as her daily driver lol
unless she likes a boy and he don't like the hears they she pulls out the duce coupe that thing is hot

orconn
05-17-11, 01:01 PM
There was a spike in E type prices a few years ago, when everybody had to have a 73 or 74 V-12 version. that lasted a little while then crapped out fast. Many, hastily done and poor quality restorations can be found. The E has a great many attributes that give it collect ability. But the coupe's "giraffe carrier" roofline (someone else's term not mine) and the corrosion problems don't help it at all.

Yeah, the V-12 E-types (not a personal favorite in either coupe or convertible) were quite the rage back in the nineties, particularly in Britain. Personally I think it had more to do with automatic transmissions and air conditioning conditioning than with the beauty elongated and bloated bodies (you are right the V-12 coupes looked like pregnant roller skates!). Today the collectors are seeking out the Series I cars both coupe and convertible, because of their "pure," unaltered design and their considerably higher performance. Unfortunately, over the years the E-type ( as well as the XJ sedans)suffered from design solutions to changing U.S. safety requirements (headlight heights and bumpers) that made the cars look clumsily embellished at best and looking like their mothers took thalidomide during pregnancy at worst. The Series I convertible is the one feature in the MOMA collection in NYC and the coupe version is considered by many connoisseurs to be among the top five most beautiful cars ever built.

You are right that E-types are very susceptible to rust (making true Southwest and California car sell for a very significant premium, rightly so) and the majority of restored cars out their have been botched in some way compromising their true authenticity ( it was common for ignorant owners and mechanics to cut away the floor section of the monocoque body to gain access to the clutch housing, to replace a clutch, then welding the plates back in place, instead of removing the engine and transmission from the car to replace he clutch). That and other poorly executed rust repairs to the stressed monocoque body tub can misalign or weaken the body structure which can only be fixed by extremely expensive dismantling and redoing the botched repair. Finding a rust free, repair free car with its' body tube in original condition can save $40,000 to 60,000. in restoration cost. Unfortunately "unmolested rust free "original cars" are very hard to come and command upwards of $35,000. for a clean drivable "survivor." The last time I heard the estimate for a ground up restoration of an E-type was upwards of $125,000. However, a good restored XKE ( hopefully not too badly botched) can be had for $60,000 or less. So it is easy to see why collectors (professional certainly) are reluctant to buy and restore any thing other than Series I cars. Eventually the Series II and III (v-12) will become more desirable, but they too suffer from rust and botched maintenance and accident repair problems.

Never the less, superb original, lightly restored cars may well fall into the ranks of "million dollar" cars. Until then like the 1930's Cords and Auburns they will be "close but no cigar" cars among the great classics!

DouglasJRizzo
05-17-11, 02:58 PM
I agree with you, the E can be a real challenge and the temptation to shortcut maintenance and jeopardize the structure is mighty large.

Will it be a $million dollar seller? Maybe.

One thing I've learned, being in the old car hobby for so long, is that it is extraordinarily volatile and fickle. What is "hot" now is "not" tomorrow, and so on. There are myriad examples of people paying outrageous sums only to take a "bath" later on.

1976 Eldorado Convertible (my fav car but still, lots of folk lost their shirts on these)
1957 Eldorado Brougham
1979 Corvette Pace Car
1959/60 Eldorado Biarritz
1988/89 ferrari (when enzo died)
1973/74 Jag E
1979 Pontiac Trans-Am 6.6
1978 Eldorado Biarritz
1978 Corvette Anniversary
1987 Buick GNX/GN
etc etc etc

Right now, some people are bidding million dollar prices - or near so - on 60s and 70s intermediate size performance cars. In a few years, expect these to level off and then DROP. Just like when guys my dad's age were bidding huge dollars on 20's and 30s cars. That market has long since stagnated and dropped for all but the precious few Dusenbergs and celebrity owned Packards with pedigree.

ThumperPup
05-17-11, 03:19 PM
Packards where hot cars
i drove a 34 Packard ones i loved it but i hated it also i drove it to the corner store and back but having to drop it down into N to start it then back up to Revers that was kind of irritating not sure if that was something that was normal or if it had a bad trans or something pain in the ass

orconn
05-17-11, 04:03 PM
^^^ I agree with you on the potential for '60's and '70's "muscle cars" to lose their crazy high price market. Reminds of the days in the 70's when Model "A" Fords were in hot demand and brought stupid high prices. I remember at a Kruze auction in Santa Monia in 1978 these Model "A"s were bringing $20,000 (a high price at the tme) and yet Mercedes 3000Sl's and "60's Ferraris of all types could be had for $9000. or less. The big buck cars were, of course the Dusenberg's, Senior Packards, Rolls and Pierce Arrow. Aston martins were a dime a dozen as were Maseratis. Any of those cars make the muscle cars look like the cheap poor man's performance cars that they were. I also remember when Otis Chandler started to hoard "Muscle Cars" in the 1980's and started the price appreciation of these much overrated cars.