: Looking at a boat and know nothing about boats. Can anyone help?



Destroyer
05-10-11, 12:46 AM
I've been considering a boat for awhile. Been living in Florida for 20 years and never had a boat. A friend of mine tells me he has a father in law that is over 80 has this "mint" boat for sale and I'm gonna go look at it tomorrow. The boat is a 2001 Sea ray cuddy (19ft) with an outboard Mercury and an alpha drive (whatever that is). Anybody have knowledge of boats of this type? He's asking $7500, is that reasonable? Just want something to go out in with the wife and kids a couple of times a month. I just returned from a mini vacation at Sannibel Island in Florida and rented a 19ft center console boat with a Yamaha 115 outboard. We had fun in it and it was reasonably quick. Would the Sea ray be comparable? Like I said, my boat knowledge is terrible so any help would be appreciated. :cool2:

STS_Seville_Hunter
05-10-11, 03:32 AM
You need boats n hoes

Playdrv4me
05-10-11, 06:05 AM
You know what they say about BOATS... Bust Out Another Thousand!

hueterm
05-10-11, 06:21 AM
The only good boat is someone else's...

C&C
05-10-11, 06:42 AM
The 'alpha drive' is an inboard/outdrive engine. I think Mercury uses GM engines and also believe it is 3.0 liter. A ten/eleven year old boat might be of concern so I would have someone check it over. I'm guessing Florida (equals saltwater) so it needs a good lookover. And boats don't 'sit' well unused, so unless it has been maintained or run fairly regularly (and maintained), caution would be advised.

Destroyer
05-10-11, 09:33 AM
You know what they say about BOATS... Bust Out Another Thousand!I've been hearing that a lot lately. Never knew boats were so troublesome. Anyway, I'm gonna look at it and take it for a ride today. After talking to some friends and the comments here I'm starting to think they are more of a PITA than it's worth. Then again, I'm a glutton for punishment. :cookoo:

EcSTSatic
05-10-11, 09:58 AM
Remember, like C&C said, that you are in a saltwater environment. It really eats up motors and other metal if they are not maintained properly. Have it surveyed by an unbiased party that knows about these things.
Think about where you will keep it when not in use too. The downside of large toys is where to keep them and how much it will cost just to sit there. I have a 26' sailboat that requires lots of space :(

drewsdeville
05-10-11, 10:13 AM
A heavy 19 footer with an Alpha drive will for sure be AT LEAST the 4.3.

C&C
05-10-11, 12:24 PM
Did a little looking around, it might even be a 5.0 liter.

OffThaHorseCEO
05-10-11, 12:54 PM
another phrase you might want to take into consideration is "the best days of owning a boat are when you buy it and when you sell it"

orconn
05-10-11, 01:28 PM
The best boat is the one your friend owns and takes you out on!

00 Deville
05-10-11, 01:52 PM
Most people around around here stick with an outboard motor in that size boat if your going to run it in saltwater. Below are pictures of an 12 month old inboard/outboard that was run in saltwater and not properly taken care of.

75523
75524

BlackCadillac91
05-10-11, 02:36 PM
Boats are a pain in the ass man. Nice to have for the few times you go out on it. Expensive as hell the rest of the time. Plus inboard/outboards especially mercs are notorious for problems. It's like they took the worst outboard motor and the worst inboard motor and mashed it into one hunky POS. My opinion, get a decent hull with a yamaha 4-stroke.

383 LT1 SS
05-10-11, 05:15 PM
I have been into fresh water boating for over 20 years. Have owned many different types of boats. As others have mentioned there is a lot work to properly maintain a boat that is used in salt water. Typically when purchasing a used boat most buyers tend to shy away from a boat that was used in salt water. I would look to see if this boat was set up for salt water use. If it was it probably will have a closed loop cooling system. In addition, if this boat comes with a trailer make sure that the trailer is galvanized.

Good luck,
383 LT1 SS

nikon
05-10-11, 05:50 PM
I love boating, I'm in south florida also.

But, you better be handy with a wrench or have deep pockets. Mine is a 93' Mercruiser 350 mag with an alpha one gen II. If the sea ray your looking at only has the 4.3, which it might don't expect it to go too quickly. With my 5.7 I do ~55mph.
I keep my boat on a lift over the water, corrosion is a huge problem, but nothing some preventative maintenance with a rattle can can't fix.

I bought my boat ~6 years ago for 10k. I have another roughly 3k into maintenance over the years, and thats doing all the work myself.

I've had to replace rubber bellows in out drive, pulled motor to replace oil pan, fuel pump, fuel lines, fuel level sender, trim pump, rebuilt trim rams...the list goes on and on.

It's fun to go out when you want and not have to rely on a friend, but be ready or buy something with a warranty like one of those yamaha jet boats.

Heres a shot of my baby....'dehydrated'

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/183591_1293530516424_1775142986_517691_819700_n.jp g

http://forums.iboats.com/forum.php
go there, lots of good reading.

And btw, outboards aren't foolproof either. My father in law can't get the lower unit off his yamaha to replace the water pump, it's a big job requiring cutting the main driveshaft ~2k to have someone do it.

Submariner409
05-10-11, 06:05 PM
Destroyer, Take it from someone who has been "boating" for 60 - yes, 60 - years. A boat is your own private hole in the water into which you throw money. I love it, but boat maintenance makes Cadillac Northstar maintenance seem like child's play. As the previous posters said, salt water and raw water cooled engines DO NOT mix well. Buy a used 19' I/O with a 350 or 454 and consider it like a laptop computer: throw-away toy.

Try to maintain this 38' of yellow pine and Olds 455....................(I still do, and its killing me.)

EDIT: Assume the boat you're looking at burns ~6 gallons an hour at planing speeds - 16 - 20 knots+. What is marine 89 octane selling for in Florida nowadays ???

Destroyer
05-10-11, 09:55 PM
Sub, as I've commented before: Cool boat! Mine is just a baby next to that (yes, I bought it). The boat was in terrific condition, showing just 153 hours. You could eat off the motor, this boat was clean, clean, clean. I did some research and most of these come with a 3.0 4 cylinder, this one has a 4.3 Chevy V6 I/O motor with the alpha drive. I was actually very surprised how quick it was. We hit 52mph with it and the owner claims it will hit 58 mph. Not bad! I myself took it to 45 mph with ease when I got a turn. Paid $7k for it which seems to be the average price for one with more hours and the smaller motor so I'm happy with this. Better pics later. :cool2:

http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z251/AstrocreepVIII/DSC07214.jpg

http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z251/AstrocreepVIII/DSC07210.jpg

http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z251/AstrocreepVIII/DSC07211.jpg

http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z251/AstrocreepVIII/DSC07212.jpg

http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z251/AstrocreepVIII/DSC07213.jpg

nikon
05-10-11, 10:38 PM
Sea ray makes a good hull, just make sure you don't run the motor when it's trimmed all the way up, you'll destroy your UV joints, especially in gear.....

That thing does look clean as hell too, good buy.

As for fuel prices, I just filled up on Sunday. Non ethanol 90 was $5.15/gal. Right around $180 to fill up for my boat. :(

btw, whereabouts in florida do you go boating?

Destroyer
05-10-11, 10:43 PM
Sea ray makes a good hull, just make sure you don't run the motor when it's trimmed all the way up, you'll destroy your UV joints, especially in gear.....

That thing does look clean as hell too, good buy.

As for fuel prices, I just filled up on Sunday. Non ethanol 90 was $5.15/gal. Right around $180 to fill up for my boat. :(Owner says the boat uses pump gas and oh, it's not a Sea Ray, it is a Stingray. My wife and I really enjoyed the ride today though. I will tow this with my '67 Cutlass 'vert. It'll be cool. :yup:

nikon
05-10-11, 10:49 PM
Ya, 90-93 is pump gas on the water. Ethanol will give you problems if you don't run the boat often.

Don't know a damn thing about stingray, good luck with it!

Destroyer
05-10-11, 10:58 PM
btw, whereabouts in florida do you go boating?The boat is in a Marina in Palm Harbor. Owner has 2 months paid at the marina which he will pass along to me. I'll decide whether I'll keep it there or park it in my garage over the next 2 months. Nice thing at the marina is that they will put it in the water and take it out for me and they will clean it up after the ride so maybe I'll keep it there. Monthly charge of $138/month seems reasonable but part of me wants to store it indoors at the house where it'll be garaged. :thumbsup:

nikon
05-10-11, 11:06 PM
Do yourself a favor and keep it in your garage. Everything will last SOOOOO much longer. I used to keep mine on a trailer indoors, now it sits over the water, it is a big difference in maintenance. Convenience is a big factor though.

Are they flushing the engine for you afterwards? Pretty damn important.

Destroyer
05-10-11, 11:11 PM
Are they flushing the engine for you afterwards? Pretty damn important.Yes, they flush the motor too. They say it's only a 3 minute affair doing that. I can't wait to get the hang of this boating thing. :thumbsup:

I~LUV~Caddys8792
05-11-11, 12:10 AM
My buddy's dad has a boat like that, we go cruising in it a few times over the summer. ALWAYS a good time to get a few buddies out there, get a case of beer and spend an afternoon in the sun.

ben.gators
05-11-11, 12:23 AM
An stupid question! What do you guys do in a boat without restroom? Yeah, I know your answer... but what if there are couple of other people that you don't feel comfortable with?

billc83
05-11-11, 07:16 AM
An stupid question! What do you guys do in a boat without restroom? Yeah, I know your answer... but what if there are couple of other people that you don't feel comfortable with?

If you're not comfortable with them, why are you on a boat with them?

ben.gators
05-11-11, 07:48 AM
Feeling comfortable for peeing in front of them, not for being on a same boat, duh!

Destroyer
05-11-11, 08:51 AM
Feeling comfortable for peeing in front of them, not for being on a same boat, duh!You can tell them you want to go for a dip in the water and pee while in there?:D

johnny kannapo
05-11-11, 08:19 PM
Searay has excellent quality boats. 115hp is a good match and you could up grade if you wanted. Its a better lake/waterway boat but would be uncomfortable if not scary on big water. 80hrs is nothing, a little over a season up north. Yamaha you know builds stellar engines. Probably a 2 stroke.
Make sure the lower end has been maintained

If the price represents market value it would be a great boat to own.

greencadillacmatt
05-11-11, 09:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7yfISlGLNU

:thumbsup:

nikon
05-11-11, 10:39 PM
Oh ya....install a new waterpump, it's in the lower unit and shouldn't take you more than a few hours to do and ~$60 in parts.

Trust me, it's cheap insurance.. they can be working great then go out the next second...recommended to do once a year, I get away with once every two years.

Destroyer
05-11-11, 10:43 PM
Searay has excellent quality boats. 115hp is a good match and you could up grade if you wanted. Its a better lake/waterway boat but would be uncomfortable if not scary on big water. 80hrs is nothing, a little over a season up north. Yamaha you know builds stellar engines. Probably a 2 stroke.
Make sure the lower end has been maintained

If the price represents market value it would be a great boat to own.The boat I rented had the 115 Yamaha. This one (the one I bought) has a 190hp 4.3 Chevy motor with a carb. It has 153 hours showing and is in nice shape. Plenty fast for me (for now). I'm happy I finally bought a boat. There are so many "boat only" places I can now go too. :thumbsup:

cadillac kevin
05-11-11, 11:33 PM
thats a nice clean boat. looks like it was barely used.
btw, do boats have air bags in the steering wheel (stupid question I know, but that looks just like an astro/ safari steering wheel with air bag)

Koooop
05-12-11, 01:01 AM
Hopefully it's fuel injected, the carbs were fussy on the 4.3. You already bought it so this is a bit late... You saw a boat on the beach in a pic in the thread, think about that, the boat is plastic and heavy, rocks are hard and pointy. Look at the hull, if there are any punctures from rocks the foam in the hull can become water logged, making heavy and slow. So if you're gonna beach it, get a hull protector at the boat store they're cheap. If you hit over 50MPH I'd go with it's dry and you probably have a 210HP (or the 220) FI motor. If you're making that speed with a carb, it's dialed in. I usually buy my boats used, but I never buy a boat that has been used in salt water (I wanna pop the cherry there). Salt screws everything up, so be sure to spend to much time with simple green and scrub brush on the outdrive and aluminum parts when you take it out. Pull the prop at the end of the season and grease the shaft. Change the oil in the lower unit once a season, check it occasionally for water in the lower unit. NEVER start the boat dry, it won't kill anything but when you see what a joke the water pump impeller is you will understand. Two batteries are a good thing, if you don't have two, get another. Buy batteries at costco, get the deep cycle marine. Put them on a marine shut off switch. Only use one at a time when you are boating so if you are getting hammered and you kill your battery you can just turn the knob to the other one, plus you can shut them off when not in use and MAJORLY extend the life of the batteries. Flush the motor after salt water use, 3-5 minutes. Put stabil in the gas in the off season or kiss your injectors goodbye. Run the blower before you start your boat so you don't blow up. look in the bilge before you buy. Don't buy a boat that kept on the dock in salt water. In So Cal I can keep a boat in the salt water for about 6 days before stuff grows on the hull that is a pain to get off. Tie the stern tightly to the dock but leave some freeplay on the bowline. Learn to tie a Bowline and a hurricane knot. Keep a spare prop, nut, pin, wrench and rubber mallet and a spare plug on board. Get some fenders for the hull. Know Port from Starboard. Learn what Rust Converter is and use it liberally on your trailer. Keep your zincs healthy, grease youy buddy bearings often but don't over fill them. If you're trailering and the boat and trailer start to sway, stay off the brakes and pick up 2 or 3 MPH. Tie your shit down when you trailer or it will blow away. Get an expensive, high quality cover that can keep water out but still breath. Don't store wet shit in your boat. If you leave it outside in the rain, it will smell bad. Don't let people eat cheetos or drinke red wine on board, you can't get those stains out. Don't start the engine with the stern drive up more than 1/4 (read your owners book on this and do what it says). You get better MPG if you get the boat up on a plane, then back the throttle down so it stays a few MPH above plane speed. Run moisture remover in your fuel every so often. Put the plug in BEFORE you put the boat in, take the plug out BEFORE you go all the way up the ramp. Lock the tongue, lock your receiver, motorcycle tie downs on the stern of the boat to the trailer. Steel cable the bow to the trailer, open the seats and storage boxes when you store the boat this will keep mildew down. When something comes apart (and it will), put a drop of clear silicone glue on the screw before you put it back together, that'll keep it from vibrating apart but you can take it apart if you want to.

And most importantly, bring your checkbook!

I really never had much trouble with my boats because I follow those simple rules. I prefer outboards myself, more reliable but not as quiet as that nice 4.3. Stingray is a good boat.

If you would've show up with a Bayliner I'd have told you to leave the plug out when you launch and put it back when you're done. And that would be all you would have needed to know.

Stingroo
05-12-11, 09:23 AM
Don't let people eat cheetos or drinke red wine on board, you can't get those stains out.

:lol: That's funny.

Koooop seems to be quite the expert!

Destroyer
05-12-11, 09:59 AM
Hopefully it's fuel injected, the carbs were fussy on the 4.3. You already bought it so this is a bit late... You saw a boat on the beach in a pic in the thread, think about that, the boat is plastic and heavy, rocks are hard and pointy. Look at the hull, if there are any punctures from rocks the foam in the hull can become water logged, making heavy and slow. So if you're gonna beach it, get a hull protector at the boat store they're cheap. If you hit over 50MPH I'd go with it's dry and you probably have a 210HP (or the 220) FI motor. If you're making that speed with a carb, it's dialed in. The boat was out of the water when I looked at it, we put it in to take it for a spin. The hull is in great shape. I didn't inspect the motor at length. He popped the cover and I noticed how clean it was. From a quick glance it looked like it had a carb not FI. He said it was 190hp.



I usually buy my boats used, but I never buy a boat that has been used in salt water (I wanna pop the cherry there). Salt screws everything up, so be sure to spend to much time with simple green and scrub brush on the outdrive and aluminum parts when you take it out. Pull the prop at the end of the season and grease the shaft. Change the oil in the lower unit once a season, check it occasionally for water in the lower unit. NEVER start the boat dry, it won't kill anything but when you see what a joke the water pump impeller is you will understand. Two batteries are a good thing, if you don't have two, get another. Buy batteries at costco, get the deep cycle marine. Put them on a marine shut off switch. Only use one at a time when you are boating so if you are getting hammered and you kill your battery you can just turn the knob to the other one, plus you can shut them off when not in use and MAJORLY extend the life of the batteries. Flush the motor after salt water use, 3-5 minutes. Put stabil in the gas in the off season or kiss your injectors goodbye. Run the blower before you start your boat so you don't blow up. look in the bilge before you buy. Don't buy a boat that kept on the dock in salt water. In So Cal I can keep a boat in the salt water for about 6 days before stuff grows on the hull that is a pain to get off. Tie the stern tightly to the dock but leave some freeplay on the bowline. Learn to tie a Bowline and a hurricane knot. Keep a spare prop, nut, pin, wrench and rubber mallet and a spare plug on board. Get some fenders for the hull. Know Port from Starboard. Learn what Rust Converter is and use it liberally on your trailer. Keep your zincs healthy, grease youy buddy bearings often but don't over fill them. If you're trailering and the boat and trailer start to sway, stay off the brakes and pick up 2 or 3 MPH. Tie your shit down when you trailer or it will blow away. Get an expensive, high quality cover that can keep water out but still breath. Don't store wet shit in your boat. If you leave it outside in the rain, it will smell bad. Don't let people eat cheetos or drinke red wine on board, you can't get those stains out. Don't start the engine with the stern drive up more than 1/4 (read your owners book on this and do what it says). You get better MPG if you get the boat up on a plane, then back the throttle down so it stays a few MPH above plane speed. Run moisture remover in your fuel every so often. Put the plug in BEFORE you put the boat in, take the plug out BEFORE you go all the way up the ramp. Lock the tongue, lock your receiver, motorcycle tie downs on the stern of the boat to the trailer. Steel cable the bow to the trailer, open the seats and storage boxes when you store the boat this will keep mildew down. When something comes apart (and it will), put a drop of clear silicone glue on the screw before you put it back together, that'll keep it from vibrating apart but you can take it apart if you want to.

And most importantly, bring your checkbook!

I really never had much trouble with my boats because I follow those simple rules. I prefer outboards myself, more reliable but not as quiet as that nice 4.3. Stingray is a good boat.

If you would've show up with a Bayliner I'd have told you to leave the plug out when you launch and put it back when you're done. And that would be all you would have needed to know.Koop, thank you for all the help here. I'm actually gonna print what you wrote and use it as reference. :thumbsup: The boat was used in salt water and I will continue to do so. I will use it on lakes too but I bought it primarily to go island hopping in the gulf. It only has 153 hours on it and was definitely kept up so I'm hoping I don't have a tremendous amount of problems. The boat has real nice covers that cover the top and an additional cover that covers the whole boat. Owner didn't even want dust getting in. It also has the battery shut off but only 1 battery right now. Thanks again.

Koooop
05-12-11, 01:12 PM
190HP, don't let anyone monkey with the carb or timing. Once you have that set right with that motor you don't touch it. So long as the prior owner didn't store it at a dock in salt you'll be fine. Zincs are very important, make sure they are all intact.

You won't have much trouble, that's a good set up.

orconn
05-12-11, 01:19 PM
Hopefully it's fuel injected, the carbs were fussy on the 4.3. You already bought it so this is a bit late... You saw a boat on the beach in a pic in the thread, think about that, the boat is plastic and heavy, rocks are hard and pointy. Look at the hull, if there are any punctures from rocks the foam in the hull can become water logged, making heavy and slow. So if you're gonna beach it, get a hull protector at the boat store they're cheap. If you hit over 50MPH I'd go with it's dry and you probably have a 210HP (or the 220) FI motor. If you're making that speed with a carb, it's dialed in. I usually buy my boats used, but I never buy a boat that has been used in salt water (I wanna pop the cherry there). Salt screws everything up, so be sure to spend to much time with simple green and scrub brush on the outdrive and aluminum parts when you take it out. Pull the prop at the end of the season and grease the shaft. Change the oil in the lower unit once a season, check it occasionally for water in the lower unit. NEVER start the boat dry, it won't kill anything but when you see what a joke the water pump impeller is you will understand. Two batteries are a good thing, if you don't have two, get another. Buy batteries at costco, get the deep cycle marine. Put them on a marine shut off switch. Only use one at a time when you are boating so if you are getting hammered and you kill your battery you can just turn the knob to the other one, plus you can shut them off when not in use and MAJORLY extend the life of the batteries. Flush the motor after salt water use, 3-5 minutes. Put stabil in the gas in the off season or kiss your injectors goodbye. Run the blower before you start your boat so you don't blow up. look in the bilge before you buy. Don't buy a boat that kept on the dock in salt water. In So Cal I can keep a boat in the salt water for about 6 days before stuff grows on the hull that is a pain to get off. Tie the stern tightly to the dock but leave some freeplay on the bowline. Learn to tie a Bowline and a hurricane knot. Keep a spare prop, nut, pin, wrench and rubber mallet and a spare plug on board. Get some fenders for the hull. Know Port from Starboard. Learn what Rust Converter is and use it liberally on your trailer. Keep your zincs healthy, grease youy buddy bearings often but don't over fill them. If you're trailering and the boat and trailer start to sway, stay off the brakes and pick up 2 or 3 MPH. Tie your shit down when you trailer or it will blow away. Get an expensive, high quality cover that can keep water out but still breath. Don't store wet shit in your boat. If you leave it outside in the rain, it will smell bad. Don't let people eat cheetos or drinke red wine on board, you can't get those stains out. Don't start the engine with the stern drive up more than 1/4 (read your owners book on this and do what it says). You get better MPG if you get the boat up on a plane, then back the throttle down so it stays a few MPH above plane speed. Run moisture remover in your fuel every so often. Put the plug in BEFORE you put the boat in, take the plug out BEFORE you go all the way up the ramp. Lock the tongue, lock your receiver, motorcycle tie downs on the stern of the boat to the trailer. Steel cable the bow to the trailer, open the seats and storage boxes when you store the boat this will keep mildew down. When something comes apart (and it will), put a drop of clear silicone glue on the screw before you put it back together, that'll keep it from vibrating apart but you can take it apart if you want to.

And most importantly, bring your checkbook!

I really never had much trouble with my boats because I follow those simple rules. I prefer outboards myself, more reliable but not as quiet as that nice 4.3. Stingray is a good boat.

If you would've show up with a Bayliner I'd have told you to leave the plug out when you launch and put it back when you're done. And that would be all you would have needed to know.

All points are good advice, learned the hard way I am sure! Make yourself a check list for things to remember for launching and getting underway ..... and use it religiously! Until you really (and I mean REALLY!) know what you are doing get out of the water before dark; it is a totally different world out on the water after dark.

Koooop
05-12-11, 01:25 PM
I don't do anything more than idle around the bay after dark.

EcSTSatic
05-12-11, 01:35 PM
Sailing on moonlit nights is a great time. It can be so quiet you can hear voices from shore.

C&C
05-12-11, 04:07 PM
I remember my first boat (and I made a pact), when I got home from boating, I would always: do a fresh water flush of the engine, do a fresh water rinse/wash of the boat and would do a fresh water rinse of the trailer (up underneath and all around). Even with the 'zincs' and the galvanised trailer (again zinc) and all the flushings, rust is going to be lurking; even if you keep on top of it it, it can be problematic but manageable. Good luck with your new cruiser.

p.s. Great show on FSN (Saturday morning where I live; S.C.) called "Ship Shape TV" with John Graviskis.

orconn
05-12-11, 05:51 PM
Sailing on moonlit nights is a great time. It can be so quiet you can hear voices from shore.

A moon light sail can be a delightful outing, that is is some drunk in a power boat doesn't run you over while impressing his passengers with his boats speed and his skills at night time navigation. Here In Virginia I can remember at least six fatalities, in the last year, that happened when power boats speeding on lakes or other bodies of water hit buoys or other boats while misjudging their own ability to see on the water at night. You may not be inebriated and be safely conducting your craft only to be hit by some careless, incompetent skipper that may have been sober or three sheets to wind!

Florian
05-12-11, 05:56 PM
Bravo drives are the heavier duty outdrives. I worked at a marina for 3 years and saw just about every outdrive made. The Alphas are nice, easy to work on and typically come with a small block Chevy engine attached to em. Marinas love to gouge for gas, so expect to lube up before you stop for gas. Sea Ray makes a solid boat, cant go wrong. Look for elex problems as they are a pain to find in a boat, also make sure your trim tabs work evenly and that there is no lag in either side. Check the speedo cable (near the outdrive, little white spear looking thing) for cracks or signs of damage. Run your hand along the jelcoat and make sure theres no damage....if so, walk.

F

jayoldschool
05-13-11, 06:58 PM
The way to have a small fortune is to start with a large fortune and then buy a boat.

Destroyer
05-15-11, 09:14 PM
Today was my first day taking the boat out myself with my wife, kids and a couple of friends and it was an awesome PITA! First, I picked it up from the marina in my extended E250 (I hate pulling trailers with this van when it involves doing anything in reverse, lol). Then I brought it home to pack it with drinks and all the stuff needed. Then I test fit it in my garage. The boat with trailer measure a little over 23ft, tight fit but it will go in the single bay where my Olds now resides. The Olds will now be on the other side of the garage next to the Jag so my gay little Escort ZX2 gets bumped out of the garage (I hate that car).

Anyway, we drove that boat for over 4 hours on the lake (it's a huge lake) and it performed flawlessly. Took us up to 53-54mph effortlessly (6 people). We loved it but there is a darkside. Getting it on/off the trailer was pain, docking it (for me) was ugly. I really have to practice these things. No regrets, I'm looking forward to taking out on salt water but will stick to the lake till I get the docking and loading/unloading thing down. :thumbsup:

orconn
05-15-11, 09:38 PM
Today was my first day taking the boat out myself with my wife, kids and a couple of friends and it was an awesome PITA! First, I picked it up from the marina in my extended E250 (I hate pulling trailers with this van when it involves doing anything in reverse, lol). Then I brought it home to pack it with drinks and all the stuff needed. Then I test fit it in my garage. The boat with trailer measure a little over 23ft, tight fit but it will go in the single bay where my Olds now resides. The Olds will now be on the other side of the garage next to the Jag so my gay little Escort ZX2 gets bumped out of the garage (I hate that car).

Anyway, we drove that boat for over 4 hours on the lake (it's a huge lake) and it performed flawlessly. Took us up to 53-54mph effortlessly (6 people). We loved it but there is a darkside. Getting it on/off the trailer was pain, docking it (for me) was ugly. I really have to practice these things. No regrets, I'm looking forward to taking out on salt water but will stick to the lake till I get the docking and loading/unloading thing down. :thumbsup:

It would probably be a good idea if you got some professional help in "boat handling" before you take a group of folks, not to mention your kids, out in you new toy again. Truth is the boat is not a toy and learning about the potential perils you may encounter on the water, not to mention the rules of the road and good seamanship and how to handle your craft before you hurt someone with it .... or worse is definitely advised.

Like flying or even driving a car being a knowledgeable skipper has a lot more to do with learning all the knowledge that goes into safe operation or responding to emergencies is really what it's all about. Any lunk head can "drive" a boat, just as any sub average IQ can drive a car, but their is a lot more to it as safely as possible.

Stingroo
05-15-11, 09:58 PM
You pulled a boat with that big ass van? My god. I hope you didn't have to merge anywhere. :lol:

Destroyer
05-15-11, 11:03 PM
It would probably be a good idea if you got some professional help in "boat handling" before you take a group of folks, not to mention your kids, out in you new toy again. Truth is the boat is not a toy and learning about the potential perils you may encounter on the water, not to mention the rules of the road and good seamanship and how to handle your craft before you hurt someone with it .... or worse is definitely advised.

Like flying or even driving a car being a knowledgeable skipper has a lot more to do with learning all the knowledge that goes into safe operation or responding to emergencies is really what it's all about. Any lunk head can "drive" a boat, just as any sub average IQ can drive a car, but their is a lot more to it as safely as possible.You are right Orconn. But experience IMO the only way to learn and experience is what I was getting......and it hurt. When I brought the boat back and (finally) docked it, I walked (or attempted to) walk in the water to get it and put it on the trailer. Well, the ground was like ice, slippery as all hell and I fell flat on my ass and scratched my elbow and back real bad. I literally had to find something to latch on to so I could pull myself out. I had to grab the rear tire of the van and pull myself out. Sucked! I didn't know how sippery it was and I learned..........the HARD WAY.

Question? How do I learn all this stuff?:hmm:

Destroyer
05-15-11, 11:04 PM
You pulled a boat with that big ass van? My god. I hope you didn't have to merge anywhere. :lol:My van has pulled loads weighing over 16k lbs. I tow stuff with it all the time and sometimes it really isn't easy. :tisk::thumbsup:

orconn
05-16-11, 12:28 AM
You are right Orconn. But experience IMO the only way to learn and experience is what I was getting......and it hurt. When I brought the boat back and (finally) docked it, I walked (or attempted to) walk in the water to get it and put it on the trailer. Well, the ground was like ice, slippery as all hell and I fell flat on my ass and scratched my elbow and back real bad. I literally had to find something to latch on to so I could pull myself out. I had to grab the rear tire of the van and pull myself out. Sucked! I didn't know how sippery it was and I learned..........the HARD WAY.

Question? How do I learn all this stuff?:hmm:

The Coast Guard Auxiliary unit near your town should offer courses in boat operation, safety and seamanship and navigation. Also there are courses offer at local colleges that are taught by Coast Guard licensed personnel ( I have good friends who are CG licensed captains that teach these courses in the Community Colleges.

I am also sure the Sub will be able to also give you some ideas where you can find help in learning safe boat operation. Please understand that my concern is that you and your family enjoy boating as safely as possible. When I started my boating experience (sailing small centerboard boats) the yacht clubs had junior sailing programs and more experienced sailors were more than willing to see us young kids get a good grounding in the sport before hurt our selves or someone else. For several decades now the sport has grown so much and the ease of owning a boat being merely a check book backed up with sufficient funds, that many people are taking to the water with virtually no knowledge or understanding of what they are doing and the risks involved. Unfortunately this situation has made boating more dangerous for themselves , but also for more experienced yachtsman who are also on the water. This particularly true where there is an abundance of small power boats. I hope will check in with your local Power Squadron and find some courses and just folks you can gain knowledge from and boating. I am sure Sub, when he checks in will have some more specific ideas for opportunities to learn about the sport.

Stingroo
05-16-11, 12:50 AM
My van has pulled loads weighing over 16k lbs. I tow stuff with it all the time and sometimes it really isn't easy. :tisk::thumbsup:

No no, not questioning the van's capabilities or power at all. Just the sheer length of it all together. You said your van was the extended version, right?

That plus the boat? Hell, that's monstrous. :lol:

orconn
05-16-11, 12:56 AM
No no, not questioning the van's capabilities or power at all. Just the sheer length of it all together. You said your van was the extended version, right?

That plus the boat? Hell, that's monstrous. :lol:

I wouldn't want to have to back that sucker to the launching ramp!

ejguillot
05-16-11, 01:19 AM
Destroyer, I have 3 pieces of advice for you (from a friend that owns a 21' center console):

1) Sign up for a Sea Tow membership http://www.seatow.com. Think of it as AAA for your boat. If you have a problem on the water, you can call them on VHF radio (You do have a radio installed, I hope? It'll suck of you don't, and you break down outside cell phone range.) and they'll come out and get you and your boat back to shore. Plus they have a lot of other benefits for rookie boat owners.

2) You're towing your boat to the marina and it takes pump gas... Get 5-6 5 gallon gas containers and buy your gas on the way to the marina. Save at least $1 a gallon.

3) Get a current EPIRB beacon! If you have a real emergency (boat sunk, capsized, or on fire, for example), when it gets wet it will transmit a distress signal with your location so the Coast Guard can find you and get rescue out ASAP. Remember the boat that capsized in the Gulf a couple of years ago and 3 of 4 occupants drowned? An EPIRB there would have saved them (since it would have given the Coast Guard their exact location and activated when the boat capsized).

Koooop
05-16-11, 03:18 AM
Back your trailer down the ramp a foot away from the dock (if you're not good a backing up a trailer be real careful, then grab the bow and stern line of you boat and walk it on the trailer. Do this from the dock, you don't even get your feet wet. Once you figure out how deep the trailer needs to be in the water you just float it up on the trailer. Get your trailer in the water just deep enough so the boat won't quite make it all the way on, when you get it that far up you just hop in the bow, hook up the crank to the bow eye and crank it up the last foot. You don't need to drive it on the trailer or have the motor running while you trailer. I usually have an extra long bow line to make this super easy. Since you use a van, you might want to use bungie cords to hold the back doors open so you can see the trailer while you back down the ramp.

Playdrv4me
05-16-11, 07:38 AM
Boat rental appears to be the order of the day.

Destroyer
05-16-11, 08:45 AM
No no, not questioning the van's capabilities or power at all. Just the sheer length of it all together. You said your van was the extended version, right?

That plus the boat? Hell, that's monstrous. :lol:It's not easy trying to maneuver the boat/trailer. As a matter of fact, I hate it! :nono:

Destroyer
05-16-11, 08:51 AM
Destroyer, I have 3 pieces of advice for you (from a friend that owns a 21' center console):

1) Sign up for a Sea Tow membership http://www.seatow.com. Think of it as AAA for your boat. If you have a problem on the water, you can call them on VHF radio (You do have a radio installed, I hope? It'll suck of you don't, and you break down outside cell phone range.) and they'll come out and get you and your boat back to shore. Plus they have a lot of other benefits for rookie boat owners.

2) You're towing your boat to the marina and it takes pump gas... Get 5-6 5 gallon gas containers and buy your gas on the way to the marina. Save at least $1 a gallon.

3) Get a current EPIRB beacon! If you have a real emergency (boat sunk, capsized, or on fire, for example), when it gets wet it will transmit a distress signal with your location so the Coast Guard can find you and get rescue out ASAP. Remember the boat that capsized in the Gulf a couple of years ago and 3 of 4 occupants drowned? An EPIRB there would have saved them (since it would have given the Coast Guard their exact location and activated when the boat capsized).

I've got the first two things covered. I have the unlimited Sea Tow, they will cover me anywhere I'm at. I don't have a VHF radio, most say a cell phone is all you need now and I'm never gonna be out of range with this small boat. As for gas I just took the boat the gas station and filled it there. I'll look into the EPIRB. Thanks for the help.

jayoldschool
05-16-11, 11:59 AM
How much fuel did the boat burn?