: What are Timesert's?



Trench
10-11-04, 04:41 AM
I've been reading through a lot of the posts on the Northstar engines and all related problems. I am still lost to what a Timesert is, though. I am sure it is explained somewhere on the site but I have not been able to nail it through a search or otherwise.

Any reply's are, as always, much appreciated.

sts96
10-11-04, 08:47 AM
Try www.timesert.com
sts96

Trench
10-11-04, 03:58 PM
OH..sure. Make me feel like an ass. :want:


Thanks, though. :p

sts96
10-11-04, 04:16 PM
Uhh........ sorry just trying to help.
sts96

Night Wolf
10-11-04, 05:05 PM
to put it simpley... you are re-threading the holes for the bolts... pulling the old threads out and putting new ones in....

I am still trying to learn about it, to see if I can do it myself, with the tools I have... this seems to be the biggest thing holding me up with my N*...

elwesso
10-11-04, 05:19 PM
As far as i know the "time serts" are little things you put inside the old holes, with smaller bolts...

BeelzeBob
10-11-04, 11:02 PM
As far as i know the "time serts" are little things you put inside the old holes, with smaller bolts...


Not exactly....

Timeserts are thread inserts designed for repairing a threaded hole that has been stripped or damaged. There are many types and brands of thread inserts (most commonly called "helicoils" for the helicoil style of insert) and the Timeserts are the ones manufactured by Time Engineering. They are a very strong, one piece insert of solid design.

Simply put, the thread repair inserts resemble a short piece of tubing with threads on the ID and the OD. The ID threads recreate/replace the original size and length of thread in the hole that is damaged and the OD threads will allow the insert to be threaded into the hole after the damaged threads have been drilled out and the hole tapped to a larger size. They are sort of a bushing to allow the hole to be drilled out and still used for the original size bolt.

To use the repair inserts the old (damaged) threads are drilled out. Then the new, larger clean hole is tapped with a special tap supplied by the insert company that is usually specific for their inserts. The insert is then threaded into the newly tapped hole. The insert will have OD threads that match the special tap and ID threads that will recreate the original threads in the hole....so...the ORIGINAL bolts are used...not smaller ones. There is always some sort of locking feature on the inserts so that once they are seated in the hole they are locked into place by breaking a tang off the insert or something like that.

The repair is very straightforward and is something that anyone that is handy with mechanics can do themselves. Just take the time to read the instructions and follow them correctly.

There is a special set of Timeserts specifically designed and developed for the Northstar head bolt holes so you must get those and that kit. The kit is special and the inserts are special...they are much longer than the normal timeserts to handle the load of the head bolts. If you check timesert's website as suggested there is a wealth of info, pictures and the listing for the P/N for the Northstar kit and inserts.

It is very common to insert repair a threaded hole in engine blocks, heads , intake manifolds and many other parts. Very common repair. Most bolt holes that get stripped are not as critical nor under as much load as a head bolt hole so the insert is not stressed very much at all. In the case of the head bolt holes, however, the insert is stressed tremendously so the correct, Timesert insert MUST be used. No exceptions regardless of the other insert claims. If done correctly, the timeserted head bolt hole will actually be stronger than the original hole. The thread inserts are made of very hard steel..typically a tool steel or inconel steel...so the threads are very strong and wear resistant. Usually, if a joint will be assembled and dissassembled many times (like on a race engine) the aluminum holes will be inserted from the beginning as the insert threads will not wear out like the aluminum ones will.

Trench
10-12-04, 01:50 AM
Excellent explanation, bbobynski.

Being Timeserts are more durable and apparently have the possible ability of holding more stress, why are they not factory inserted? Or is it just an unneeded expense? Why fix what isnít broken?

But when it does break, you need to fix two things. heh. IE head gasket and then Timeserts.

Night Wolf
10-12-04, 03:53 PM
Well, after reading that, it dosn't seem AS bad...

...but, you would you go about drilling out the old threads and putting the new ones in? does it need to be on a workbench with a drill press.... or could it be done on an engine stand with a cordless drill?.... it is is the former, it will be very difficult for me, as I would have to transport the block somewhere, if it is the later, then I have everything I need to use, and can just purchess the timesert kit...

elwesso
10-12-04, 05:26 PM
Personally, Im not sure i would trust myself with a cordless drill..... Mgiht make it crooked.....

PLUS, have you drilled through metal with a battery operated drill... I have, and it doesnt work out to well, trust me...

Ranger
10-12-04, 08:40 PM
It can and is done on a stand. I believe the kit comes with a guide to drill the holes straight. I have heard someone who has done this say not to use a cordless drill.

Night Wolf
10-12-04, 09:22 PM
well, when I say cordless, I mean a hand-held drill... I have easy access to a corded hand-held drill...

..basically, once I get this thing on my enigne stand, will I be able to do the timesert myself using a hand-held drill... and not a drill press of some sort? that will make my life a whole bunch more easy, and infact eliminate my biggest concern building the engine...

BeelzeBob
10-12-04, 09:37 PM
Yes, you can install the timeserts on a engine stand with a hand drill....

growe3
10-13-04, 12:32 AM
well, when I say cordless, I mean a hand-held drill... I have easy access to a corded hand-held drill...

..basically, once I get this thing on my enigne stand, will I be able to do the timesert myself using a hand-held drill... and not a drill press of some sort? that will make my life a whole bunch more easy, and infact eliminate my biggest concern building the engine...

I would reccommend using a 1/2" drill motor, with a variable speed trigger control. With a smaller drill motor you may have problems keeping the drilling action smooth and under control. Aluminum is easy to trash.

-George

Night Wolf
10-13-04, 11:03 PM
I am not very familer with corded drills (never had the need to get one) could someone show me a good drill to get... say from Sears that would be good for the job? Thanks

Oh, and the fact this can be done on the stand, witht he drill... damn, I feel far better now, that was my biggest concern... it seems like the only thing now will be the time to do it... but this isn't my winter project for nothing :)

w8itgtsbtr
10-14-04, 01:05 AM
For corded hand drills I would go with a Milwaukee 1/2 Inch Magnum Drill With Keyless Chuck.