: TECHRON, Spring, and 10%



Submariner409
04-07-11, 06:04 PM
Autobarn (www.autobarn.com) is having a spring coupon sale.

Use the code SPRINGTEN in the bottom of your order form, plus free shipping over $50 (?).

I just ordered a 12-case of TECHRON 20 oz. bottles at $8.55 apiece - over 33% off from local, and no tax.

ThumperPup
04-07-11, 08:12 PM
hey sub save one for me ill buy you a brewski or 3 in may if you buy me a bottle of techron lol

Sevillian273
04-08-11, 08:58 PM
I'll have a Techron and coke, on the rocks.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-09-11, 10:38 PM
Techron is OK, a decent fuel injector cleaner in tank additive form, but it's no BG 44K...

Aron9000
04-10-11, 12:18 AM
I think GM brand fuel injector cleaner is just relabeled techron. Or at least it used to be.

I've always believed that if you run a high quality, name brand gas in your car, fuel system cleaner is not neccisary. Of course I always change out my fuel filter every 30k when I do spark plugs and coolant.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-10-11, 01:02 AM
Yes and no. Name brand gasoline companies put some detergents/cleaners into their gasoline to keep your injectors and combustion chambers clean by keeping carbon deposits low, but to keep the price of a gallon of gasoline at a reasonable cost, the companies will limit the amounts of cleaners in their gas to a minute amount when compared to the cleaners to a good fuel injector cleaning chemical.

drewsdeville
04-10-11, 11:37 AM
A properly designed and maintained engine is self cleaning anyway. Never saw an engine that needed to be torn down, running improperly because of "deposits" due to failure to use the magical Techron. There's always an underlying problem.

That said, most of the public isn't dumping bottles of Techron in their tank. Go to the junkyard and pull the heads on a random modern FI engine. Chances are it'll be squeaky clean.

Fuel is expensive enough. Dumping some more money in your gas tank to fix a problem that isn't there is crazy in my opinion. To each their own, though. Chevron execs need to feed their families to.

Ranger
04-10-11, 11:42 AM
Never used a fuel additive. Never had a fuel related problem. Never replaced an injector. :noidea:

Sevillian273
04-10-11, 11:53 AM
I think the majority of the deposits in the intake tract on engines today come from the EGR system and not the fuel. Gasoline alone is a powerful solvent.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-10-11, 11:59 AM
Lmao Drew. You're a funny guy. How does an engine "self clean" anyways? Is it like an oven where you push some magical button and it gets really hot and burns away all the carbon?

Let's examine carbon for a second. It's an unavoidable byproduct of the combustion process and is available in all engines, gas or diesel, two stroke or four, 2 Cylinders up to V-16. Carbon will stick to the backside of the intake valves, piston crowns and injector pintles, causing lower fuel efficiency because when the fuel is sprayed at the backside of the intake valve, some of it will hit the carbon buildup, much like lighter fluid does to a charcoal briquette. So if all of the fuel isn't going into the combustion chamber, your engine isn't as fuel efficient as it was when it was new. In some engines, (Gen 1 Vortec V8's, Jaguar/Land Rover 4.2 & 5.0L V8s, among others) their injectors are extremely susceptible to carbon build up, causing plugging and misfires.

IF YOU CAN RID THE CARBON FROM THE INJECTORS AND COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, YOUR ENGINE WILL BE MORE FUEL EFFICIENT.

Gasoline by it's self won't rid the carbon, it's what caused the carbon. A good, quality gasoline company will blend a gasoline with nitrogen additives, to help keep the amounts of carbon buildup down to a reasonable level, but being that it's a small additive package being added to a LOT of gasoline, it's results will be minimal. But imagine, if you had a chemical that wasn't gasoline based, nor isopropyl alcohol based, but rather based off of polyetheramines, it would do a good job of cleaning the carbon away, as well as the varnish that the carbon attaches it's self to in the injectors and on the backside of the valves. That's what BG 44K does.

Let me take a real life example for you. I've got that '00 Astro as a company car. It's got 259k miles on it. All winter long, I was getting 14.5-15.5 mpg with it, no matter where I went. Once it got warmer through March, I was getting about 16.0-16.5 with it, which is about average for that old thing. I added a can of that BG 44K to the fuel tank at fill up two weeks ago and immediately I noticed better mileage. I went from 16.6 at one fill up to 17.8 the next, and my driving style didn't change, nor did my route, and that was with 258k miles on it. As the 44K wore through a bit more (it's a slow acting cleaner, it take 2-3 tankfulls to really notice full effects), I noticed that throttle response was improving and power was restored a bit...rather like blowing your nose when you've got a head cold...it breathes better, accelerates better, doesn't need to downshift to accelerate up a hill or pass someone as much anymore.

We at BG don't make any crazy claims that your car will get amazing mileage if you use our products. All we talk about it helping your car get back to it's factory rated mileage. FWIW, my Astro is rated at 13/18 mpg and that's what it's getting after the 44K.

Now you may laugh at this and think it's all salestalk, but let me ask you this. If it were all a scam and nobody needed fuel cleaners, would the company I work for, BG Products, have been in business, making fuel additives and injector cleaners for 40 years? Would BG 44K have been in production since 1985 if it didn't work? Would it be my top selling product if my clients didn't use it and see results?

http://www.bgprod.com/home.html

Thank you for your time.

Sevillian273
04-10-11, 12:10 PM
Im sure the product does what it claims but I think a good bit of the sales (and repeat purchases) of all additive products is largely supported by the placebo effect.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-10-11, 03:16 PM
I'll give you that, but it's the same for anything really...Gatorade, Coffee, Ibproufin.... it's all in the amount of faith you want to put into it.

V-Eight
04-10-11, 04:06 PM
But Coffee(caffeine) and Ibuprofen both have scientifically proven effects.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-10-11, 05:17 PM
So has BG 44K, and it's been endorsed by Land Rover and Jaguar in TSB's dating from February of 2011 from Jaguar and Land Rover's research & development teams, saying that when they have an injector sticking issue, due to the low quality of some fuels today, in their 4.2 and 5.0L V8s, they recommend using the BG 44K to cure any misfire issues, instead of replacing injectors under warranty.

Jesda
04-10-11, 06:47 PM
BG44k is good stuff. Some parts stores have it for $20-$25, and its a much better value than Techron due to its higher concentration. Wait until your tank is down to 1/4, top it off, and go for a long drive. Its more effective/needed on some cars than others.

I have un-fond memories of yanking bad injectors out of Nissans and Infinitis in sweltering summer heat. I'm willing to forgo a couple visits to the frozen custard stand in favor of an occasional fuel additive.

ThumperPup
04-10-11, 06:56 PM
I used Techron for the first time ever a week ago ones the engine hit 8k i think
and the fuel pump and new filter hit 4k i put it in think its running good
i think im going to do it every 5k for now on or problaby atleast every oil change wich i think im going to start doing 6k instead of every 10k
that way when the oil light comes on at my 3k per qt ill just change the oil no need to add anything between changes

yeah so far i like the techon i only used a 10oz bottle i think it was so ill problaby get better action from the 20oz just wont buy at walmart again cause all they have are 10oz bottles

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-10-11, 06:57 PM
Do you see a lot of parts stores in your area that carry it? BG is supposed to be sold only to repair facilities (professionals) and not to any sort of wholesale store or retailer.

Jesda
04-10-11, 07:29 PM
Theres a couple smaller shops I sometimes go to that do repair work with a handful of small retail shelves up front. They usually sell fluids, batteries, rudimentary tools, keychains, etc.

orconn
04-10-11, 07:44 PM
I thought, when discussing Techron several months back, it was decided that if you used Shell Super in your car that adding Techron to your tank was a waste of money. Am I wrong in this assumption?

ThumperPup
04-10-11, 08:59 PM
not sure if that asumptionis right but for those of us with 2000 and newer i don't think we would waste our money on shell 93 premium
i think i read that you should add the techron with a tank of shell premium ones but not sure about that
i think Sub said soemthing around those lines

Sevillian273
04-10-11, 09:32 PM
I'm in the "use quality fuel and forget about it" camp. I used to run whatever was cheap (walmart, BJ's, Citgo, etc). When I replaced my injectors for the first time, I inspected the intake valves and they were flat black. I started running ONLY top teir fuel shortly after that(shell, chevron). Upon every other inspection afterwards (several!), the intake valves have been clean and shiny.

My point is: The premium quality fuels do what they claim. However I think whatever increase in performance derived from a cleaner intake valve due to the use of these fuels is probably negligible in an otherwise well maintained engine. The only situation in which I would endorse the use of any 'specialty' cleaner would be when the malfunction of (or poor maintenance of)one or more systems has led to excessive buildup of deposits.

Ranger
04-10-11, 09:49 PM
I think the majority of the deposits in the intake tract on engines today come from the EGR system and not the fuel. Gasoline alone is a powerful solvent.

Actually it is a combination of EGR and PCV gases. No gas or additive will eliminate it.

Ranger
04-10-11, 09:51 PM
I'm in the "use quality fuel and forget about it" camp. I used to run whatever was cheap (walmart, BJ's, Citgo, etc). When I replaced my injectors for the first time, I inspected the intake valves and they were flat black. I started running ONLY top teir fuel shortly after that(shell, chevron). Upon every other inspection afterwards (several!), the intake valves have been clean and shiny.

My point is: The premium quality fuels do what they claim. However I think whatever increase in performance derived from a cleaner intake valve due to the use of these fuels is probably negligible in an otherwise well maintained engine. The only situation in which I would endorse the use of any 'specialty' cleaner would be when the malfunction of (or poor maintenance of)one or more systems has led to excessive buildup of deposits.

How do you inspect the intake valves without a tear down?

Sevillian273
04-10-11, 09:55 PM
Flashlight through the injector holes.

drewsdeville
04-11-11, 12:19 AM
How does an engine "self clean" anyways? Is it like an oven where you push some magical button and it gets really hot and burns away all the carbon?


Oh dear...

Jesda
04-11-11, 12:41 AM
Best way to self-clean an engine is pushing it into a river where it gets thoroughly rinsed.

drewsdeville
04-11-11, 12:54 AM
This guy's gonna get it right no matter what it takes - Cleaned and disinfected for maximum performance. All of the bad, harmful bacteria in the combustion chamber was seriously holding this engine back. Works best if engine is running when cleaning solution is introduced. Leave soak for no less than 5 hours.

http://www.defence.gov.au/news/navynews/editions/4808/images/21-Car wash.jpg

Sevillian273
04-11-11, 06:32 AM
All he had to do was press the magical button...

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m280/merc892003/d18970f8c11b1a20a983a7b6cec65a51wix_mp_256.jpg

Aron9000
04-11-11, 02:06 PM
Hopefully guy was smart enough to use a chlorine pool. Salt water pool wouldn't really kill those nasty bacteria and would make things kind of rusty.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
04-11-11, 06:28 PM
That entire pool is that liquid glass crap used during C4C.

Jesda
04-12-11, 02:10 AM
Lol!