: RIP Nate Dogg



Jesda
03-16-11, 04:38 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BH7VpsumYEc

http://rapfix.mtv.com/2011/03/16/singer-nate-dogg-passes-away/

41 years old

billc83
03-16-11, 07:58 AM
I remember seeing he had a stroke quite some time ago. Looks like bad health finally regulated on him.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-16-11, 10:12 AM
thats messed up

Jesda
03-16-11, 01:01 PM
copypasta:

On a cool, clear night (typical to Southern California) Warren G travels through his neighborhood, searching for women with whom he might initiate sexual intercourse. He has chosen to engage in this pursuit alone.

Nate Dogg, having just arrived in Long Beach, seeks Warren. On his way to find Warren, Nate passes a car full of women who are excited to see him. Regardless, he insists to the women that there is no cause for excitement.

Warren makes a left turn at 21st Street and Lewis Ave, in the East Hill/Salt Lake neighborhood[6], where he sees a group of young men enjoying a game of dice together. He parks his car and greets them. He is excited to find people to play with, but to his chagrin, he discovers they intend to relieve him of his material possessions. Once the hopeful robbers reveal their firearms, Warren realizes he is in a less than favorable predicament.

Meanwhile, Nate passes the women, as they are low on his list of priorities. His primary concern is locating Warren. After curtly casting away the strumpets (whose interest in Nate was such that they crashed their automobile), he serendipitously stumbles upon his friend, Warren G, being held up by the young miscreants.

Warren, unaware that Nate is surreptitiously observing the scene unfold, is in disbelief that he's being robbed. The perpetrators have taken jewelry and a name brand designer watch from Warren, who is so incredulous that he asks what else the robbers intend to steal. This is most likely a rhetorical question.

Observing these unfortunate proceedings, Nate realizes that he may have to use his firearm to deliver his friend from harm.

The tension crescendos as the robbers point their guns to Warren's head. Warren senses the gravity of his situation. He cannot believe the events unfolding could happen in his own neighborhood. As he imagines himself in a fantastical escape, he catches a glimpse of his friend, Nate.

Nate has seventeen cartridges to expend (sixteen residing in the pistol's magazine, with a solitary round placed in the chamber and ready to be fired) on the group of robbers, and he uses many of them. Afterward, he generously shares the credit for neutralizing the situation with Warren, though it is clear that Nate did all of the difficult work. Putting congratulations aside, Nate quickly reminds himself that he has committed multiple homicides to save Warren before letting his friend know that there are females nearby if he wishes to fornicate with them.

Warren recalls that it was the promise of copulation that coaxed him away from his previous activities, and is thankful that Nate knows a way to satisfy these urges.

Nate quickly finds the women who earlier crashed their car on Nate's account. He remarks to one that he is fond of her physical appeal. The woman, impressed by Nate's singing ability, asks that he and Warren allow her and her friends to share transportation. Soon, both friends are driving with automobiles full of women to the East Side Motel, presumably to consummate their flirtation in an orgy.

The third verse is more expository, with Warren and Nate explaining their G Funk musical style. Nate displays his bravado by claiming that individuals with equivalent knowledge could not even attempt to approach his level of lyrical mastery. There follows a brief discussion of the genre's musicological features, with special care taken to point out that in said milieu the rhythm is not in fact the rhythm, as one might assume, but actually the bass. Similarly the bass serves a purpose closer to that which the treble would in more traditional musical forms. Nate goes on to note that if any third party smokes as he does, they would find themselves in a state of intoxication daily (from Nate's other works, it can be inferred that the substance referenced is marijuana). Nate concludes his delineation of the night by issuing a vague threat to "busters," suggesting that he and Warren will further "regulate" any potential incidents in the future (presumably by engaging their enemies with small arms fire).

orconn
03-16-11, 02:05 PM
Thank you Jesda, for the excellent exposition of that whom we speak here!

Playdrv4me
03-16-11, 06:37 PM
LMFAO... "This is most likely a rhetorical question."

Rolex
03-16-11, 07:53 PM
2 strokes in his late 30s....holy sift! Poor guy musta had some serious (poorly managed) health problems leading up to that. RIP

Stingroo
03-16-11, 08:21 PM
Jesda did you steal that from my facebook page? LOL

Warren G needs a new side kick. Stealers of his property and other busters need not apply.

Jesda
03-16-11, 08:24 PM
It was once on the wikipedia page for the song, which appears to be gone now

Stingroo
03-16-11, 08:28 PM
Ah. I copied it to my FB notes months ago.

Sevillian273
03-16-11, 08:36 PM
http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m280/merc892003/908fbdf4a2282715bcf2fd82a5a80472.jpg

SDCaddyLacky
03-16-11, 09:41 PM
Damn that sucks! I loved Nate Dogg RIP:crying:. I swear he could take a crappy sounding track, and turn it into a instant classic. Every song he was on, turned into a classic basically, he was that good. Their was nobody like Nate, the closest wannabe to him was Butch Cassidy that collaborated with Snoop Dogg on the Eastsiders Album, who sounds kinda like Nate Dogg, but not as good.

The Regulator song I remember like it came out yesterday, I still have that Warren G album in my room as we speak! At the time I was around 7-8 years old living in Anaheim. Gangsta rap in the early 90's was king, everybody was bumping all the WestCoast hip hop in those days, especially in California.

Another great track was called "Tha Game Don't Wait" it's old, and didn't really hit the air waves, but it's a great song with Nate Dogg, Snoop, Xzibit, and Warren G..

I truly miss the G Funk era, it was sooo California and all about having fun, not hardcore gang banging shit like what DeathRow Records put out, which was also good, just a completely different style of WestCoast hip hop.

At the same time, he did suffer from 2 major strokes, and it was inevitable that death was going to catch up to him, but not so soon!

Jesda
03-16-11, 10:33 PM
I miss when rap was about urban storytelling. I hate the P Diddy era of self-aggrandizing narcissism.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-16-11, 11:17 PM
That and at least it was coherent.

Today its about what kind of dumb similes you can throw while speaking like you have bricks in your mouth.

Niki minaj: its goin down, basement
Ludacris: i fill her up, baloons
Drake: come and find me, nemo

Its overdone and played out. Songs dont make sense anymore.

Stingroo
03-16-11, 11:27 PM
I'm gonna go out on a limb, and probably get flamed for this, but the "West Coast" style hip hop seems to me like it started the trends that brought us to where we are today. The 80s were a simpler time for rap music, the golden age, if you will.

That's why 90% of the rap music on my car's flash drive is from that era. :)

thebigjimsho
03-16-11, 11:45 PM
I'm gonna go out on a limb, and probably get flamed for this, but the "West Coast" style hip hop seems to me like it started the trends that brought us to where we are today. The 80s were a simpler time for rap music, the golden age, if you will.

That's why 90% of the rap music on my car's flash drive is from that era. :)
foolishness

Stingroo
03-17-11, 02:44 AM
No sir.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 10:42 AM
I'm gonna go out on a limb, and probably get flamed for this, but the "West Coast" style hip hop seems to me like it started the trends that brought us to where we are today. The 80s were a simpler time for rap music, the golden age, if you will.

That's why 90% of the rap music on my car's flash drive is from that era. :)

please elaborate and expand on this theory if you will

Stingroo
03-17-11, 11:16 AM
Well, bear in mind this is mostly from what I've listened to and been exposed to for most of my life, but to me, 80's hip hop seems like it either carried more message, or was just in general in better spirits than most of what we got from the 90s.

Some examples of some of my favorites:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4o8TeqKhgY
(No pun intended)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hh1AypBaIEk&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqw2uby0dzc


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJewbFZHI34&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hN1SKVx31s


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXCXVWjSbik&feature=related

I'm not saying I don't like some of the 90's WC stuff, a lot of it's pretty good too, but it doesn't bring a smile to my face like the 80s stuff does. 'Tis all preference anyway, and all of it's miles ahead of the shit on the radio today.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 11:37 AM
no i meant elaborate on why you think 90's WC hip hop started the trends that made music what it is today.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 11:38 AM
and to add my 2 cents, IMO its east coast hip hop that evolved into the crap we have today

SDCaddyLacky
03-17-11, 04:48 PM
What has happened to East Coast hip hop is a disgrace. We all know the West Coast fell off years and years ago, but sadly all the "real" hip hop artist from the East like Nas, Fat Joe and others have gone underground ever since mid to late 2000's. Some have moved on because of the changing scene, and stopp rappin all together. Hip Hop is gone, it died like 3-4 years ago. it's almost as if as a society we have come to tolerate less of hardcore rap music, and accepting all this whack ass garbage pop trash that has taken over everything. It's turned into club music, techo hip hop or electro hip hop which is lame as ever, skinny jeans in all.

I miss the realness and grittiness of Hip Hop, they're so many different styles of hip hop, but what all of them had in common once upon a time ago was that they told the truth on what happens in the hoods of America, instead of rappin about how much cash they raised today, and balling it up in the clubs.

Not all hip hop has to be hard, some dudes like Tony Touch which isn't gangster, has a good sound to him, his beats were dope and he worked with a ton of artist as a DJ.

You can still find good hip hop music online. Dapiff.com has thousands of different artist uploading their mixtapes for people to listen to.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 04:52 PM
What has happened to East Coast hip hop is a disgrace. We all know the West Coast fell off years and years ago, but sadly all the "real" hip hop artist from the East like Nas, Fat Joe and others have gone underground ever since mid to late 2000's. Some have moved on because of the changing scene, and stopp rappin all together. Hip Hop is gone, it died like 3-4 years ago. it's almost as if as a society we have come to tolerate less of hardcore rap music, and accepting all this whack ass garbage pop trash that has taken over everything. It's turned into club music, techo hip hop or electro hip hop which is lame as ever, skinny jeans in all.

I miss the realness and grittiness of Hip Hop, they're so many different styles of hip hop, but what all of them had in common once upon a time ago was that they told the truth on what happens in the hoods of America, instead of rappin about how much cash they raised today, and balling it up in the clubs.

Not all hip hop has to be hard, some dudes like Tony Touch which isn't gangster, has a good sound to him, his beats were dope and he worked with a ton of artist as a DJ.

You can still find good hip hop music online. Dapiff.com has thousands of different artist uploading their mixtapes for people to listen to.


fat joe real? ha yea right. LEAN BACK LEAN BACK

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 05:16 PM
i know opinions differ GREATLY on music, but i miss songs like these. Very similiar to Ice Cubes It Was A Good Day. I understand every song cant be like this but almost none are nowadays.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljIhADpW-4o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tAuPZqQEgw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJqiMPGxSI0

Jesda
03-17-11, 06:46 PM
YEAH
WHAT
OKAY!
SKEET SKEET SKEET


And that's the end of rap.

OffThaHorseCEO
03-17-11, 06:49 PM
my brother came up with a platinum selling rap formula

yell out a string of three numerals (extra effective if its an area code, may be substitued with the name of a place) + yell out a random word or phrase (better if its a question or an affirmation) + say a command

instant chart topper, the rest can be jibberish

thebigjimsho
03-17-11, 08:49 PM
No sir.
Absolutely is.

It's not what West Coast or East Coast or Dirty South, or whatever, has become. What you're seeing is what you see in any music genre as it gains public acceptance. It gets dumbed down and simplified for a popular audience. I call what we have now hip hop pop.

Throughout the 80s, radio played zero rap. The only outlets you had were to go to clubs, find college stations or watch BET. Yo MTV raps was great...for a few hours a week. You worked to get to listen to rap. There were plenty of so so acts back then. And usually, the crossover types like LL Cool J and Fresh Prince were the most popular, though far from the most talented.

But guys like that are what broke rap into the mainstream. There were myriads of quality acts throughout the 90s and even today. But they get lost in the hip hop pop.

astatemade
03-19-11, 02:31 PM
R.i.p