: See the USA in a Chevrolet - Using patriotism to sell cars.



Jesda
02-11-11, 11:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9_HK2dlCPk

Campbell-Ewald, the ad agency behind “Like A Rock”, is credited with coming up with “See The USA In Your Chevrolet,” which Advertising Age ranks among the most successful campaigns of the last century.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGZvQoPxhNs

The 1952 campaign with Dinah Shore was nothing short of brilliant -- catchy, bright, and perfectly in tune with America’s endless supply of optimism.

Chevrolet’s advertising has always leaned on its ties to American culture, unabashedly associating itself with hot dogs, baseball, and apple pie. While patriotism served as a point of pride in the 1950s and 1960s, it later functioned as a retreat from issues of lacking quality, fuel economy, and sophistication.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IocCC1-jeTY

The agency was also responsible for the “Heartbeat of America” campaign used in the 1980s and early 1990s, which resonated throughout working-class middle America. It seemed as if marketers were suggesting, “If you don’t buy from Chevrolet, you want America’s heart to stop beating.”

And here in the breadbasket, that's how many of us felt.

Heartbeat had the unfortunate burden of having to sell some of Chevrolet’s worst-built vehicles, including the Beretta, Celebrity, Corsica, and Cavalier. Patriotism ran high, but quality ran low during the years of Smith and Stempel.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smM2xhmxiOc

Undeniably, the campaign worked as more than a few of us in 'working-class' America bought into it. I grew up in a lower-class neighborhood in a medium-sized Illinois town. I remember my dad having a chat with one of our neighbors over why we should buy American. We had a new 1988 Nissan Sentra and they had a new Chevy Beretta, a sleek looking coupe. The Nissan Sentra (which I hated driving) continued to serve our family until it finally died in my teenage hands at 170,000 miles. Within a couple years, the neighbor’s Beretta completely lost all of the paint on the hood and roof. It didn’t stay with their family for much longer after that.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1ZgN-bFdlE

Japanese imports in the 1970s and early 1980s suffered from miserable corrosion, a brutal lack of refinement, and questionable build quality, but offered mechanical dependability and fuel efficiency, two particularly important consumer needs during a period of political and economic instability. As fuel and living costs spiked during the Carter era, GM allowed an entire generation of customers to disappear, followed by entire regions, like California.

After a series of budget cuts, GM fired Campbell-Ewald in 2010.

Most of the cars I’ve owned have been American-made, and I have a fondness for GM products like Corvette, Camaro, the entire Cadillac division, and Chevy/GMC trucks, but Chevrolet’s mass market passenger cars, at least during the three decades that I’ve been alive, have rarely lived up to the promises made by slick marketing.

Today, GM wants to remind us that “Chevy Runs Deep”, reiterating Chevy’s connection to American culture. Indeed, Chevrolet runs deeper than ever thanks to federal bailouts, whether we like it or not.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5AG2KbD5ko

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-12-11, 12:06 AM
I can vividly remember the "like a rock" commercials with the Chevy trucks in the early '90s. Nearly 20 years later, those commercials still bring a smile to my face. I love seeing the Silverados get used and abused like trucks should, not babied like most trucks in commercials nowadays.

OffThaHorseCEO
02-12-11, 03:56 PM
i miss those kind of commercials, those that showed trucks towing or cars racing cornering zig-zagging etc.


does anyone remember that stupid honda commercial with a civic jumping from building to building? everytime i saw that, i wanted to buy one just to drive it off of a building and try to sue

now they have commercials with hamsters driving cars...seriously, you make cars for hamsters?

orconn
02-12-11, 04:27 PM
i miss those kind of commercials, those that showed trucks towing or cars racing cornering zig-zagging etc.


does anyone remember that stupid honda commercial with a civic jumping from building to building? everytime i saw that, i wanted to buy one just to drive it off of a building and try to sue

now they have commercials with hamsters driving cars...seriously, you make cars for hamsters?

They wanted to use sheep, but hamsters were cheaper!

EChas3
02-12-11, 06:56 PM
Besides, the sheep all have regular jobs at Consumer Reports!

dkozloski
02-12-11, 07:14 PM
See the USSR in your armored car.
Siberia is the greatest land of all.

V-Eight
02-12-11, 09:04 PM
Is that Tim Allen voicing the new commercial?

Playdrv4me
02-12-11, 09:05 PM
Is that Tim Allen voicing the new commercial?

Yes. He does all the Chevy ones now.

Koooop
02-12-11, 11:24 PM
The airhorns in my Corvette play the "See the USA in your Chevrolet" theme. And they are quite loud!

Jesda
02-12-11, 11:37 PM
The thumping from the heartbeat ad freaks out my dog for some reason.

C&C
02-13-11, 06:10 AM
See the USSR in your armored car.
Siberia is the greatest land of all.

Now that's funny.

And kudos to the Dina Shore ads of old.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-13-11, 08:32 AM
I actually saw an early '90s Silverado yesterday, with the "heartbeat of america" logo painted into the pin striping at the backs of the front fenders. Seeing that reminded me how popular that slogan actually was back then.

Stingroo
02-13-11, 08:54 AM
When I was at Best Buy yesterday an older gentleman came in with a really cool looking Heartbeat of America jacket with stars and stripes for sleeves. I wanted it. :lol:

I think that's my favorite Chevy slogan though - and "Chevy Runs Deep" is absolutely terrible.

77CDV
02-13-11, 10:50 PM
Pity Dinah Shore is dead. That woman could sing.

The Tony Show
02-14-11, 10:06 AM
People should have a measure of patriotism factoring into their purchase whenever possible. Regardless of where they're assembled, the profits from any sale enrich a company based either here in America or in a foreign country. The long term domino effect of buying foreign can be seen in the collapse of great American industries like steel and formerly great cities like Detroit.

Despite the fact that people today would have you believe otherwise, patriotism isn't a dirty word, nor does it mean you're a toothless redneck yahoo. Even when they stink, people will root for the home team in sports because that's what you do. Ask a Jets fan if he's going to start rooting for the Giants because the Jets keep failing to go all the way, and he'll probably deck you. Of those hundreds of thousands of Jets fans however, I'll bet 80% of them have no problem buying a foreign car because they had a problem with an American car 20 years ago, and they'll also bitch about the economy and unemployment while driving their Corolla or Sonata.

Whenever possible, I support American companies with my dollar. I'm proud of this country, I want to see its businesses do well and enrich the private economy, and I can never be called a hypocrite for complaining about the state of affairs because I'm not part of the problem.

Jesda
02-14-11, 10:19 AM
You're wrongly sequencing cause and effect. Mediocrity and arrogance precede industrial decline -- patriotism, or a lack of it, did not cause GM to go from 50% of us market share to less than 20.

Toyota's profits are down 39 percent due in part to declining us market share. National pride is almost as low as it was during the Carter era.

I promise you, few people younger than 60 are buying Chevy products because they're American. Those who made the mistake of doing so in the 80s are now driving Altimas.

Koooop
02-14-11, 01:47 PM
Until the day they wake up and realize Altimas suck balls.

Jesda
02-14-11, 01:57 PM
Especially if they got the 2.5.

Friends of mine had a 2.5L 2002 Altima. Nice car except for the cats, alternator, heater core, and... oh yeah... the total engine failure. They managed to unload it for a couple grand. Sucks for newlyweds to have to lose money like that.

thebigjimsho
02-14-11, 02:18 PM
I'll gladly buy American...if American is the best there is...

gdwriter
02-14-11, 03:40 PM
Pity Dinah Shore is dead. That woman could sing.Indeed. She also spoofed her sweet, squeaky clean image playing Melody (Melanie) opposite Carol Burnett as Starlet O'Hara (Scarlett) in The Carol Burnett Show's brilliant send-up of Gone With the Wind:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aRMZ4ePmMM&


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjhtxfSMIWk&

Jesda
02-14-11, 03:49 PM
I love CB! She was great on 30 Rock last year

Playdrv4me
02-14-11, 03:49 PM
I'll gladly buy American...if American is the best there is...

:werd:

gdwriter
02-14-11, 03:59 PM
I love CB! She was great on 30 Rock last yearI also loved her guest spot as Sue Sylvester's mother on Glee, although there wasn't enough of her. Hope she makes another appearance.

orconn
02-14-11, 04:49 PM
As an interesting side note, back in the 1980's I used to regularly see Miss Dinah Shore tooling down Olympic Boulevard in her Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. Guess she had decided to let the rest of us "See the U.S.A in a Chevrolet!"

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-14-11, 06:22 PM
I'll gladly buy American...if American is the best there is...

Yup. Agreed 100%.

77CDV
02-14-11, 10:49 PM
As an interesting side note, back in the 1980's I used to regularly see Miss Dinah Shore tooling down Olympic Boulevard in her Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. Guess she had decided to let the rest of us "See the U.S.A in a Chevrolet!"

Poor Southern girl makes good.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-14-11, 11:32 PM
The "See The USA in a Chevrolet" slogan debuted during the red scare era. Chevrolet could have just as easily used the "communists drive Fords" slogan and had it worked just as well. :lol:

77CDV
02-15-11, 09:12 PM
^But everyone knew Commies drove Studebakers.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-16-11, 12:16 AM
^But everyone knew Commies drove Studebakers.

That reference is over my head.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
02-16-11, 12:16 AM
^But everyone knew Commies drove Studebakers.

That reference is over my head.

drewsdeville
02-16-11, 01:30 AM
Studebakers were used for service by the Soviets during WWII and the Cold War.

Koooop
02-16-11, 01:38 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5A6NyVa6lY

See the USA air horns.

Jesda
02-16-11, 01:59 AM
Nice!!!!

gdwriter
02-16-11, 02:01 AM
Bravo!

Koooop
02-16-11, 02:09 AM
Pretty cool!

I don't think many people really know what the tune is when I light them up these days though.

My Dad put those in the car 40 years ago.

Stingroo
02-16-11, 08:52 AM
I'd say that reeks of badass.

77CDV
02-17-11, 06:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5A6NyVa6lY

See the USA air horns.

Win.

orconn
02-17-11, 07:53 PM
Studebakers were used for service by the Soviets during WWII and the Cold War.

As a former Cold Warrior I don't remember ever seeing or hearing of Studebaker cars going to the USSR. Under the Lend Lease Program of assisting the Soviet Union during W.W. II G.I. trucks built by Studebaker were sent to the Soviets and were used during the war, but then trucks from other manufacturers were also sent under this program. During the Cold War years the official car of senior Soviet leadership were various models of the Zil, which in its' first two iterations were reverse engineered Packard models (the Zil 10 looked very much (almost exactly) like a 1941 Packard. However, the cars they were copied from were all cars that were developed long before the merger of Studebaker and Packard in the mid-fifties. Later on Zil models resembled mid -sixties Chryslers.

Premier Brezhnev (sp?) was rather well known for his collection of cars and was reportedly to be especially fond of his 1970's Cadillac Eldorado convertible!

77CDV
02-17-11, 09:28 PM
I was being facetious about the Studebaker-Commie connection (although the Trabants and Wartburgs look like something Studebaker would have built toward the end of its life). Late 50s-early 60s Studebakers are just so odd looking and appealed to a very certain kind of person. Remember the Scotsman? Soviet-grade transportation built right here in the USA.

orconn
02-17-11, 11:37 PM
^^^ I figured as such, but let's not forget the lovely 1953 Studebaker Starliner hardtop, or the fact that Studebaker was the first automaker to bring out an entirely new post-war design, a very successful one at that. And of course there were the supercharged (Packard powered) Golden Hawks of the sixties. I grew up in Pasadena, CA which in the forties and fifties was home to Paul G. Hoffman (his estate was in the same neighborhood where I grew up) who was president, among other things (head of the group that drafted Eisenhower for the presidency), of Studebaker Corp. As a consequence many people in the neighborhood owned Studebakers. After my father's last pass at Packard ownership, he also owned a very nice 1951 Studebaker Regal convertible. His was a six cylinder Champion, but as convertibles they were all Regals which were the top of the line. My father really like the light good handling of the Studebaker, as did many of our neighbors in Linda Vista, who had various models of the cars.

It was a shame that along with the destruction of the Pacific Red car transit system, Studebaker and Packard met their demise at the hands of GM.

You are right though the Studebaker "Scotsman" and other attempts to find a market in the "economy car" market segment were very Spartan, but them so were the early basic Corvairs and Falcons, not to mention the VW beetles whose entry into the U.S. market brought on the a new level of "basic" auto transportation.

77CDV
02-18-11, 09:51 PM
"First by Far with a Post-War Car!" Unfortunately, that expenditure probably cost Studebaker it's life in the selling wars of the early 1950s. They didn't have anything left to trump GM and Ford, and the Starlight design, though a Raymond Lowey masterpiece, got long in the tooth fast, kind of like the bathtub Packards and Hudsons.

Pity, really. If you look at the senior Studebakers of the 1930s, they were gorgeous cars. For some reason, the Golden Hawk (and its lesser stablemates), never appealed to me. The lines just look wonky and don't flow well to my eye. The gold and white two tone does make a statement, though.