: Glad to hear Regal will be built in the U.S.!



orconn
01-15-11, 07:58 PM
Saw a report on the new Regal on "motor Week" today, this new Buick got decent reviews. Apparently the car is a very good handling machine despite being front wheel drive. The one they were testing was equipped with a I-4 with an automatic trans so 0 to 60 times were slow as would be expected, but the car proved quite agile through the pylon course and had a reasonable stopping distance. It was disclosed that the car would be built in the U.S. starting next year and, at that time, the model lineup would be expanded to include some much better performing models.

I was especially glad to hear tha this Buick Regal would be built in the U.S.; maybe this will preclude GM foisting another unsupported German built car, like the Catera, on the American public. Let's hope so!

SDCaddyLacky
01-15-11, 08:34 PM
Still not fond of a 4 banger powering a luxury car:hmm::helpless: We are really starting to lower our standards, Buick is not helping itself.:nono:

Jesda
01-15-11, 09:27 PM
I've had good and bad cars made by UAW. Hopefully for GM the execution lives up to the promise.

Aron9000
01-16-11, 03:51 AM
I've had good and bad cars made by UAW. Hopefully for GM the execution lives up to the promise.

See I don't really think its the union guys on the front line that make or break a car. Its really about the engineering or lack thereof that will determine if a car is reliable. And if the company decides to spend more money on parts with tighter tolerances that fit together well in the first place(that I think is the reason all of GM's plastic interiors squeak/rattle)

Jesda
01-16-11, 04:04 AM
Well, sort of.

GM's issues in the past have been a combination of poor labor, poor controls, and poor engineering. Meanwhile, Ford and Mazda's AutoAlliance (UAW) plant has been pretty good. I dont think the AutoAlliance plant has ever won awards, but its never put out anything with poor or questionable assembly. The Mazda 6 and Mustang are built there now.

When the Seville and Eldorado were at their peak for build quality in the early 90s, it was achieved by slowing the production line at Hamtramck down dramatically.

thebigjimsho
01-16-11, 06:19 PM
Still not fond of a 4 banger powering a luxury car:hmm::helpless: We are really starting to lower our standards, Buick is not helping itself.:nono:
The focus is on economy these days. As long as there are options, why not offer it? Buick is helping itself plenty...

orconn
01-16-11, 11:52 PM
See I don't really think its the union guys on the front line that make or break a car. Its really about the engineering or lack thereof that will determine if a car is reliable. And if the company decides to spend more money on parts with tighter tolerances that fit together well in the first place(that I think is the reason all of GM's plastic interiors squeak/rattle)

I couldn't disagree more that the guys who finally assemble a product bear no responsibility for its final quality. The engineers design a product to be produced at a price point, the design is refined and finalized for production ... at that point it is going to be the best it can be given the manufacturing parameters established by manufacturing management. From then on it is up to the Line workers and their supervisors to make sure the product is assembled correctly and to the quality best quality standards. The fairly wide variation of assembly quality of the 5th generation Seville shows that both the line workers and their supervisors were not performing their jobs to the best of their ability.

Back in 2000 I visited my local Cadillac dealer to buy/lease a new business car for my wife. I was interested in the Catera because of the special lease they were offering at the time. While looking at the Catera (which was assembled in Germany) I also closely checked out a brand new 5th generation Seville STS that was sitting next to the Catera on the showroom floor. There was no comparison in the fit and finish of the two cars; the Catera was first class job of fit and finish, the STS had about the same quality materials as the Catera but the fit and finish was far inferior ... I mean, the difference screamed at you! It was obvious that who ever assembled these Cadillac cars had a very different attitude toward their responsibility for the quality of their work.

I admit, aside from one or two visits to a GM assembly line, I am not familiar with what goes on UAW manned assembly lines, but from what I have heard from those on this Forum and judging fro the products these lines have produced over the years, the attention to their assembly jobs must take second place to other interests of the workers.