: Viet Nam - The Land of a Thousand Hells



Ranger
09-22-10, 01:04 AM
If you are old enough, you'll remember a lot of these pictures. If you're not, you should see them.
The pictures and documentary have more meaning to those that were there, it's long but worth the journey.



http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/04/30/captured-a-look-back-at-the-vietnam-war-on-the-35th-anniversary-of-the-fall-of-saigon-2/

gdwriter
09-22-10, 02:32 AM
I recognize a number of those photos, and they should all serve are a grim reminder to anybody who has a cavalier attitude about going to war.

My Dad was career USAF, and he missed a good part of the first six years of my life with multiple TDYs, mostly to Guam, which was a major base of B-52 operations (he was a B-52 crew chief). He also spent 1971 at Da Nang working on the propaganda planes, or as they were also known, the bullshit bombers. And he was back in Gaum for the Linebacker II bombings over Christmas in 1972. I still remember my Mom, seven months pregnant with my little sister, getting stuck under the Christmas tree trying to put it in the stand. :rofl:

I always try to remember to thank my Dad on Veteran's Day for the sacrifices he made to serve our country. I'll never forget how one year he said, "Well, you all made sacrifices, too, with me gone so much." And he's right, it was a sacrifice for our whole family. Fortunately, my Mom kept the household running smoothly, and unlike many of his friends, who worried about their wives running around, neglecting their kids or blowing money, my Dad never had to worry about those things. And while I remember missing him, it hasn't left lasting scars.

Still, there is a picture from 1970 that's (in)famous in our family. My Dad is heading off on another TDY, and a friend took a picture of us all on the flight line at Dyess AFB with a big, hulking B-52 in the background. My Mom and sister are putting on a brave face, but I'm wearing the most ferocious scowl you've ever seen on a four-year-old. If looks could kill, the brass who were sending my Dad away yet again would have dropped dead on the spot.

Florian
09-22-10, 11:28 AM
very emotive photos, I was a kid when all this was going on and remember it well......these photos take me back.


F

EcSTSatic
09-22-10, 01:32 PM
Holy cow! It has been 35 years. I remember it well, I keep my own photo journal of my experience. Nothing else will make you mature faster than a tour in a war zone.
Pray for our troops!


Semper Fi

Goodnight Saigon - Billy Joel
j6gZefW4yEA

Submariner409
09-22-10, 01:40 PM
I never set foot on the land, but saw quite a bit of the NVN shore through a periscope.

CIWS
09-22-10, 06:03 PM
Some great photos in there I've not seen before.

orconn
09-23-10, 01:11 AM
A very poignant collection of photos from the Vietnam War. I was a 24 year year old ASA (Army Security Agency) analyst who arrived in country on July 1, 1968. I spent from mid July to late November 0f 1968 attched to the 1st Air Cavalry Division which was located at Camp Evans a few clicks south of the DMZ. After the 1st Air Ca was deployed south to delta region in November of 1968, I was kept North and assigned to ASA I Corps headquarters at Phu Bai till I left country in April 1969.

While my role was not really that of a combatant, all of us whether with combat units like the 1st Cav or with so called behind the lines support units, saw combat, whether by snipers and or mortar attacks or ground or air combat. I have nothing but the highest admiration for the men of all the services who fought in the Vietnam War. They carried not only the burden of fighting a treacherous war without battle lines, but also did it knowing full well that they were not appreciated at home, and in many cases were rebuked for their service.

Seeing these photos, with all they show about the suffering that war brings, also reminds me that my Mother and stepfather had to also witness the war each evening on the nightly news. So I have special feelings for the families of the men who fought in Vietnam. This was the first war to be brought to the civilian population in such a direct fashion. I am still undecided about the need for loved ones to have to suffer the daily reminder of the peril their men and women face when at war.

gdwriter
09-23-10, 01:26 AM
I have nothing but the highest admiration for the men of all the services who fought in the Vietnam War. They carried not only the burden of fighting a treacherous war without battle lines, but also did it knowing full well that they were not appreciated at home, and in many cases were rebuked for their service.

Seeing these photos, with all they show about the suffering that war brings, also reminds me that my Mother and stepfather had to also witness the war each evening on the nightly news. So I have special feelings for the families of the men who fought in Vietnam. This was the first war to be brought to the civilian population in such a direct fashion. I am still undecided about the need for loved ones to have to suffer the daily reminder of the peril their men and women face when at war.I have a step-nephew who saw duty in Iraq, and I worried about him when he was over there, as well as for his wife and kids.

And I still vividly remember when a Viet Cong rocket hit one of the barracks at Da Nang. My poor mother was so terrified until she got word that my Dad was OK. We were living in New Hampshire at the time so we could be close to family, and my Dad's brother and his wife were such a strong support for my Mom. That bond remains, and they're still my favorite aunt and uncle. I just saw them a couple of weeks ago when they were getting their motorhome serviced near Eugene. It's been nearly 40 years, but my Mom is still so grateful for how they helped her during such a difficult time.

JimHare
09-25-10, 02:59 PM
Unless you lived through those times, you have no idea how divisive the war was at that time. I was 18 in 1971 and thanks only to a high draft number, did not have to be concerned with the military. Like many kids of "liberal" parents back then I protested the war several times, but I don't remember being particularly "anti-military" or having any animosity toward the regular foot soldier. I knew enough guys from high school that were either drafted or volunteered to have had any ill feelings towards them. We mostly hated the Nixon administration.
One thing that many people don't realize is that the Vietnam war was fought by our youngest boys. The average age of a regular foot soldier was 24 in WW II - but just 19 in Vietnam. I'm not sure what it is in the current 'war on terrorism' but I hope it's a bit higher. I also hope we get our butts out of Afghanistan without too many more casualties. That place is even more of a wasteland than Vietnam was.

93DevilleUSMC
09-25-10, 06:11 PM
To all of those here who went to Vietnam, thank you. You guys are just now starting to get the recognition you deserve; God knows the public didn't treat you well during and immediately after the war. Thanks for doing the hardest job in the worst circumstances, and for going to do it while many others ran away from it.


Ranger, I remember a story you told me about your time in Vietnam. If I recall correctly, it was about you loading a round backwards into an AK mag and leaving it for the enemy to pick up.

93DevilleUSMC
09-25-10, 06:14 PM
Also, can anyone tell me what unit the Hueys in photo # 30 belong to?

dkozloski
09-25-10, 06:39 PM
The South China Sea was smooth as a sheet of glass and hotter than the hubs of hell. There was nothing about that whole mess that was pleasant or desireable.

orconn
09-25-10, 06:46 PM
Also, can anyone tell me what unit the Hueys in photo # 30 belong to?

I believe those choppers belonged to the 9th Infantry Div. which was deployed around Saigon around that time.

93DevilleUSMC
09-25-10, 07:06 PM
I believe those choppers belonged to the 9th Infantry Div. which was deployed around Saigon around that time.

Thanks.

Ranger
09-25-10, 10:10 PM
To all of those here who went to Vietnam, thank you. You guys are just now starting to get the recognition you deserve; God knows the public didn't treat you well during and immediately after the war. Thanks for doing the hardest job in the worst circumstances, and for going to do it while many others ran away from it.


Ranger, I remember a story you told me about your time in Vietnam. If I recall correctly, it was about you loading a round backwards into an AK mag and leaving it for the enemy to pick up.

Hehe, no I pulled the bullet, emptied the gun powder and then packed the case with C4 and the reinserted the bullet. Loaded the round about 3 down in an AK magazine and dropped it beside the road in a village knowing it would make it's way back to Charlie. :histeric: What I wouldn't have given to see the look on his face (if he had one left) when that thing went off.

iowasevillests
09-25-10, 10:42 PM
Hehe, no I pulled the bullet, emptied the gun powder and then packed the case with C4 and the reinserted the bullet. Loaded the round about 3 down in an AK magazine and dropped it beside the road in a village knowing it would make it's way back to Charlie. :histeric: What I wouldn't have given to see the look on his face (if he had one left) when that thing went off.

That is epic Ranger! And thanks to you and all the others who served.

Ranger
09-25-10, 10:57 PM
Also, can anyone tell me what unit the Hueys in photo # 30 belong to?

The 9th Division was south of Saigon in the delta. The caption says it was NE of Saigon so I doubt it was the 9th Inf. Div. The closest I can find is either the 118th AHC (Assault Helicopter Company) or the 174th AHC.
http://vietnam-hueys.tripod.com/nose%20art%20page.htm

gary88
09-25-10, 11:54 PM
Some very strong photos, thanks for posting.

orconn
09-26-10, 12:23 AM
The 9th Division was south of Saigon in the delta. The caption says it was NE of Saigon so I doubt it was the 9th Inf. Div. The closest I can find is either the 118th AHC (Assault Helicopter Company) or the 174th AHC.
http://vietnam-hueys.tripod.com/nose%20art%20page.htm

Ranger, I think you got it right with the 174th AHC "Red 9" First Flight Platoon Scorpions 1970-71. The nose art appears to be identical with the ones on the Hueys in the picture.

93DevilleUSMC
09-26-10, 02:17 AM
Hehe, no I pulled the bullet, emptied the gun powder and then packed the case with C4 and the reinserted the bullet. Loaded the round about 3 down in an AK magazine and dropped it beside the road in a village knowing it would make it's way back to Charlie. :histeric: What I wouldn't have given to see the look on his face (if he had one left) when that thing went off.

LOL in that case, I sincerely doubt he had much of a face left (or arms, for that matter).

93DevilleUSMC
09-26-10, 02:25 AM
Orconn, Ranger, I think you both called it. The 174th AHC seems to have the only nose art that matches photo # 30.