: Rust repair paint job project completed- Lots of pics



MudAnt
09-10-10, 09:15 PM
Some of you may remember my last thread (http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/rwd-19xx-1984-deville-fleetwood-1985/207339-rust-repair-touch-up.html) about repairing the paint defects on my '86 fwb. Now that the project is done, I thought I'd share the results with you guys. I think it turned out quite well for my having no experience with body work, poor conditions in my garage (cold, dusty, not much room, poor ventilation) and using rattle cans. I actually finished this project quite some time ago, but I've been rather busy this past week.

Anyways, here is the before shot of the driver's side quarter panel

http://filesmelt.com/dl/P1030801.jpg

Prepped:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2808.jpg

Painted and clearcoated:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2817.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2818.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2820.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_28511.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2824.jpg

Finished product, minus all the chrome pieces:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2829.jpg

And the passenger side, before:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_26261.JPG

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2793.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2794.jpg

Prepped:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2832.jpg

Primed:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2837.jpg

Painted and clearcoated:

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2841.jpg

http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2842.jpg

MudAnt
09-10-10, 09:16 PM
http://filesmelt.com/dl/IMG_2843.jpg

Didn't get any pictures with the chrome back on yet, I've been busy and the weather's been rainy and poor since I finished this. I'm quite happy with how it turned out, and I learned quite a bit about painting in the process. Anyone attempting a similar project, feel free to ask questions!

YourMainParadox
09-10-10, 09:28 PM
wow come over and do mine!

csbuckn
09-10-10, 09:53 PM
Spray can? I'm interested in how you prepped and sanded. What was the process before actually spraying any paint?

77CDV
09-10-10, 11:31 PM
Turned out rather well. Good on you! :thumbsup:

MudAnt
09-11-10, 12:46 AM
Spray can? I'm interested in how you prepped and sanded. What was the process before actually spraying any paint?

Removed all the rust with a Flap disc + angle grinder, wire brush on a drill, 60 grit sandpaper on an orbital sander, and rust converter.
Then I filled with Pro-form flowable finishing putty, sanded the filler.
Then sanded the whole surface at 400 grit, and applied 2-3 coats of high-build primer.
After the primer was really dry, it was sanded up to 1000 grit, washed (to remove all the dust), dried for about half an hour, and basecoated, 2-3 coats.
Sanded the basecoat with 1000 grit, washed again, then applied clearcoat after an hour.

Here's what I learned from this project (AKA body work for dummies):

The clearcoating was the worst with an aerosol can. In order to get a nice shine out of the clearcoat, it has to go on quite wet. The trouble with the can is, it makes a ton of over-spray which produces a dull finish adjacent to where you are spraying. This isn't a problem if you're spraying a small area, or small individual parts, but when spraying an entire panel (or in this case, 2 panels) it's very difficult to keep the whole finish "wet", and get it all to dry evenly. If I hadn't run out of time because of the weather going bad (yay northern weather) I would have invested the time to learn to use a spray gun and sprayed the clearcoat with it.

If you are going to use aerosol cans, get one of these (Or something similar):
http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=38
It helps prevent spattering caused by your finger getting in the spray, gives you much more control over the spray, and lets you paint for longer without your finger getting sore.


-Prep work is very important. Take at least 2 hours to mask the area (if you're spraying a panel), and spend about an entire day doing prep (if rust removal is involved, otherwise, at least an afternoon).

-Rattle cans are ok for basecoat and primer, but avoid them if possible because sometimes they spatter, they have very narrow spray, they aren't really any cheaper than bulk paint, they have to be shaken all the time, and they can only spray for about 5 seconds before the spray starts to die. Certainly avoid spraying clearcoat on any remotely large area with cans.

-Ideally you should sand between each coat, but that would take a long time. Realistically, you should sand between each paint type. (Primer, basecoat and clearcoat.) Sanding after primer is critical to remove the very rough surface that is produced. Sanding after basecoat will help improve the gloss of the finished product. Don't be scared by the awful scratches and such produced in the basecoat by sanding, they will be filled in by the clearcoat and become invisible, as long as you're using a high-grit sandpaper (800+)

-Try to keep the work area as dust-free as possible, especially when you're doing the clearcoat. Dust will stick to the paint and make awful little bumps in your finish.

-A carbon-filtered mask is very important, especially for the primer and clearcoats. If working in a garage, keep it well ventilated with box fans. I know we've grown used to ignoring safety warnings on many products now a days, but the warnings on paint are serious. I only used a paper mask when doing my first job, and I was light-headed for the whole day. I even did that job outside so all the fumes blew away, and I was using a less harmful primer from Canadian tire. High build primer fumes are far worse, and the fumes from 2K clearcoat (not what I was using) are lethal!

-The metal should be +20 to paint, and humidity should be low.

I know there's more, but that's all I can think of (and care to type :P) for now.

Bro-Ham
09-11-10, 02:04 AM
You're quite a cancer doctor! Your car must be very happy, and you too I'm sure. I am saying extra prayers for this repair to last awhile for you. Did you wet sand and buff after painting?

pompste
09-11-10, 02:49 AM
Removed all the rust with a Flap disc + angle grinder, wire brush on a drill, 60 grit sandpaper on an orbital sander, and rust converter.
Then I filled with Pro-form flowable finishing putty, sanded the filler.
Then sanded the whole surface at 400 grit, and applied 2-3 coats of high-build primer.
After the primer was really dry, it was sanded up to 1000 grit, washed (to remove all the dust), dried for about half an hour, and basecoated, 2-3 coats.
Sanded the basecoat with 1000 grit, washed again, then applied clearcoat after an hour.

Here's what I learned from this project (AKA body work for dummies):

The clearcoating was the worst with an aerosol can. In order to get a nice shine out of the clearcoat, it has to go on quite wet. The trouble with the can is, it makes a ton of over-spray which produces a dull finish adjacent to where you are spraying. This isn't a problem if you're spraying a small area, or small individual parts, but when spraying an entire panel (or in this case, 2 panels) it's very difficult to keep the whole finish "wet", and get it all to dry evenly. If I hadn't run out of time because of the weather going bad (yay northern weather) I would have invested the time to learn to use a spray gun and sprayed the clearcoat with it.

If you are going to use aerosol cans, get one of these (Or something similar):
http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=38
It helps prevent spattering caused by your finger getting in the spray, gives you much more control over the spray, and lets you paint for longer without your finger getting sore.


-Prep work is very important. Take at least 2 hours to mask the area (if you're spraying a panel), and spend about an entire day doing prep (if rust removal is involved, otherwise, at least an afternoon).

-Rattle cans are ok for basecoat and primer, but avoid them if possible because sometimes they spatter, they have very narrow spray, they aren't really any cheaper than bulk paint, they have to be shaken all the time, and they can only spray for about 5 seconds before the spray starts to die. Certainly avoid spraying clearcoat on any remotely large area with cans.

-Ideally you should sand between each coat, but that would take a long time. Realistically, you should sand between each paint type. (Primer, basecoat and clearcoat.) Sanding after primer is critical to remove the very rough surface that is produced. Sanding after basecoat will help improve the gloss of the finished product. Don't be scared by the awful scratches and such produced in the basecoat by sanding, they will be filled in by the clearcoat and become invisible, as long as you're using a high-grit sandpaper (800+)

-Try to keep the work area as dust-free as possible, especially when you're doing the clearcoat. Dust will stick to the paint and make awful little bumps in your finish.

-A carbon-filtered mask is very important, especially for the primer and clearcoats. If working in a garage, keep it well ventilated with box fans. I know we've grown used to ignoring safety warnings on many products now a days, but the warnings on paint are serious. I only used a paper mask when doing my first job, and I was light-headed for the whole day. I even did that job outside so all the fumes blew away, and I was using a less harmful primer from Canadian tire. High build primer fumes are far worse, and the fumes from 2K clearcoat (not what I was using) are lethal!

-The metal should be +20 to paint, and humidity should be low.

I know there's more, but that's all I can think of (and care to type :P) for now.

Looks like a real good job,dude! And thanks for all the detailed info! If i may ask----how much did all this do it yourself work cost you?
I`ve got a great looking 1978 Deville with a couple 50 cent piece sized,and then some,rust spots on the left rear quarter panel that i want repaired sometime.If i repair it myself,i`ll make a copy of your repair info.

MudAnt
09-11-10, 03:18 AM
You're quite a cancer doctor! Your car must be very happy, and you too I'm sure. I am saying extra prayers for this repair to last awhile for you. Did you wet sand and buff after painting?

I sure am happy with it! While it may not be half of a professional job, it's still 1000 times better than those big ugly rust spots, and I now have peace of mind knowing it's not getting any worse. I think I did this just in time before it went from harmless surface rust to actually eating away at the metal.

I don't expect it to last forever, but that's ok, because my long-term plan is to keep this car as my daily-driver/ongoing project, and keep it in "nice, but not flawless" condition. Then, when finances, time and garage space permit, I'll buy something rust free from the south and spend many years doing a complete restoration. Not sure what said car will be, whether it's another 80's Brougham, or something completely different like a '59.

I haven't done anything to it since I finished, since I literally finished the night before the weather went to sh*t. I also started at Post-secondary the following Monday.


Looks like a real good job,dude! And thanks for all the detailed info! If i may ask----how much did all this do it yourself work cost you?
I`ve got a great looking 1978 Deville with a couple 50 cent piece sized,and then some,rust spots on the left rear quarter panel that i want repaired sometime.If i repair it myself,i`ll make a copy of your repair info.

I never actually added up all the receipts, though I did buy some extra resources because of mistakes I made.

The clearcoat was $12/can, and I used 3 cans. The basecoat was $30/can (mixed from WA code), used 4 cans. The primer was about $12/can as well, used 3 cans. I also used 2 rolls of plastic and 2 rolls of green masking tape, totals to about $25. Probably went through about $15 worth of sandpaper. Bought a DeWALT angle grinder (used with a flapdisc, not the grinding wheel) for $125, though they can be found for as low as $20 (Mastercraft, on sale at Canadian tire). You won't need a grinder if you just have coin sized rust spots.
I also used a DeWALT random orbital sander which my parents already had, though I assume it costs around $100, $50 for a cheap one.

Based on this, I spent about $200 on supplies, the basecoat being the most expensive. I wasted about 1 can of primer, basecoat and clearcoat because of errors I made, so it could have been done for about $150 if I did everything right the first time.

outsider
09-11-10, 09:40 AM
nice man, i did a few spots on my 95 yesterday out of boredom...but come to find out I got the wrong shade of silver...doh!

Cadillacboy
09-11-10, 11:05 AM
All the credits right go to you , your restoration was an epic one

:highfive:

MudAnt
09-11-10, 01:18 PM
Thanks for all the comments everyone! I hope to continue this next summer by repairing around the door handles, and a few other minor spots. I'd also like to take off the back bumper and make sure nothing is happening in there.
I was planning to do all this this year, but summer is so short here and I ran out of time.

brougham
09-11-10, 02:58 PM
It looks good all one colour. At least it's a dark car that hid the rust well. Imagine that rust on a white car!! I never bother sanding between coats with spray cans. Ive found it never makes a difference in how it looks and ends up just wasting time.
Man you have to do something with that pinstripe on the back door it looks horrible! :holycrap:

MudAnt
09-11-10, 03:05 PM
It looks good all one colour. At least it's a dark car that hid the rust well. Imagine that rust on a white car!! I never bother sanding between coats with spray cans. Ive found it never makes a difference in how it looks and ends up just wasting time.
Man you have to do something with that pinstripe on the back door it looks horrible! :holycrap:

Yeah I know, I was going to re-do that when I fixed the rust around the handle, but since removing the handle is a big job in itself, I didn't get around to it. That will be next summer though!

brougham
09-11-10, 03:22 PM
THe handle is pretty easy to remove. Take off the door panel inside, take the rod off it and There is 2 or 3 bolts that hold the handle on. But I wouldn't want to be doing any more boy work after what you just did. Especially now that it's getting cooler out and damp over night.

MudAnt
09-11-10, 05:06 PM
THe handle is pretty easy to remove. Take off the door panel inside, take the rod off it and There is 2 or 3 bolts that hold the handle on. But I wouldn't want to be doing any more boy work after what you just did. Especially now that it's getting cooler out and damp over night.

The handle itself isn't too hard, but I heard you need a special tool to remove the door panel, and you could break some little plastic clips in the process.

Where in Canada are you?

outsider
09-12-10, 03:11 AM
you don't need any special tools for these door panels. you can do it with just a butter knife. you may break some clips but they really shouldn't be reused anyways, they get loose.

MudAnt
09-12-10, 12:52 PM
you don't need any special tools for these door panels. you can do it with just a butter knife. you may break some clips but they really shouldn't be reused anyways, they get loose.

But don't these clips hold the door panel on?

Stingroo
09-12-10, 12:55 PM
You can buy new clips at Napa or its Canadian equivalent. :thumbsup:

MudAnt
09-13-10, 12:09 AM
Oh, I didn't know they were generic/universal things.

Tune in next summer for more northern climate-reversal!

Stingroo
09-13-10, 01:24 AM
Most of them are, yeah.

And invest in a door panel removal tool. It's your best friend. Looks like a screw driver with a sort of chisel blade on the end. Jayoldschool will probably chime in to the thread with a picture of one as he has in other threads. lol

outsider
09-13-10, 10:35 AM
ya tools like that help, but I'm too cheap so I just used a butter knife :o

jayoldschool
09-13-10, 01:16 PM
lol

http://www.autotoys.com/pics/doorpanelremovaltooldeluxe.jpg

Stingroo
09-13-10, 03:36 PM
See? See? What'd I tell ya!

:thumbsup:

N0DIH
09-14-10, 09:04 AM
Makes me want to just do it on my 80 TTA and see how well it works out. The rust on my FW is from the other side and made a hole over the right rear tire. :(

Wish bumpers could be done same way.....

brougham
09-16-10, 09:30 PM
The handle itself isn't too hard, but I heard you need a special tool to remove the door panel, and you could break some little plastic clips in the process.

Where in Canada are you?

No special tool needed. You can even use a screw driver to pry the door panel off. You can get that tool from Princess Auto for a couple bucks but other ways are just as easy. Ive never had problems with clips breaking, if they do they were old and brittle and should be changed anyway. You don't want one breaking while everything is together and have the door get stuck shut:ill:
I'm near Ottawa.