: Zonie77



AoD
09-02-10, 09:28 PM
I'm too new to send private messages? That's cool. This is a copy pasta of that PM.



Hi there!

My name's Andy, and I just bought my first Caddy, a 2000 SLS with 111,339 miles and a bad radiator.

The hg's are "good" (the seal hasn't failed just yet). But I still intend to stud the block and replace the gaskets with layered steel. All well in good, right?

The problem is, I have never done it before. I found this thread of yours:
http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/northstar-performance-technical-discussion/5052-n-head-gasket-repair-part-i.html

Here you give a quick run down and......

link to an article you wrote on the procedure:
http://caddyinfo.netgetgoing.com/howto/nsrepair.htm

Dead link. Now I'm thinking this was probably a pretty good piece of information, I was wondering if it was still around somewhere in the land of existence, and if so, any way you could point me in the right direction, being the author and all?

Thanks in advance
Andy

Ranger
09-02-10, 10:57 PM
Why go through all that work and expense to fix something that ain't broke?

zonie77
09-03-10, 12:18 AM
andy,

I have to agree with Ranger, if they are still good why change them? It is a LOT of work, at least 40 hours the first time. I would definitely change the radiator and see what happens from there. When you chang the radiator you will be replacing most of the coolant.

If I remember right, the article I linked to was someone replacing the short block and they had the new short block inserted. The good thing was some pics of the block and the timeserting. You could see the coolant passages and oil drainbacks and tell how far apart they are. There are other pics on the web that show the deck. There is a video on timeserting also. I think that's on the timsert web site.

AoD
09-03-10, 12:32 AM
Oh this isn't happening immediately, but only because I don't have the money to do it. It kind of bothers me knowing I just spent a large chunk of savings. The car has to be able to reliably get me around for the next 4 years straight while I go to school out of town.

My plans were to get the car running correctly before the end of October, which is when the inspection runs out on my "not worth repairing" '87 buick century, and then use this as my daily ride for the next year while I prepare (see: save money) for school. If I could guarantee the hg's for another four years, then I'd be all about leaving that job for later.. lol

It shouldn't take much. Radiator as stated, normal oil change, plugs, possibly a coil or two , probably not.. and the plennum, and any other things I can find all over this forum that I can replace without having to do a large (over a day DT) job.

It throws a p0300 and while idling it has a pretty wicked oscillation going on but I think the motor mount is squashed too as it's all but imperceptible above 2000rpm.

I just wish I had some way to find out, within a reasonable margin of error how bad hg's were and about how long I had left.



*Edit* You mean I won't be replacing all of the coolant? Is it not as simple as flushing all points in the system opened? Also, what do you think of this:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Cadillac-Seville-1997-1998-1999-2000-Service-Manual-_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQhashZitem4aa3adecf0QQitemZ32057 3664496QQptZMotorsQ5fManualsQ5fLiterature

looks like the real deal to me.. but at that price is seems like BS, too.

zonie77
09-03-10, 12:47 PM
You will be replacing something like 75%of the coolant, if you want fill with water, run awhile to mix, drain and refill with coolant at 60-40 mix. That will get out 90% of the old coolant. What you don't get out is what is in the block. You can try compressed air through the block and get a little more out.

Since it's hard to get a perfect 50-50 I prefer to go on the stronger side. I know people who ran 100% coolant without a problem.

Even in a 4 year span it's hard to say what the chance of HG's going would be. I would have a hard time justifying doing them now when a lot of cars don't have a failure in 200K.

For the P0300, did you change plugs yet?

Ranger
09-03-10, 12:49 PM
I just wish I had some way to find out, within a reasonable margin of error how bad hg's were and about how long I had left.
What makes you think they are bad? You seem to be under the impression that a HG failure is a given and the only question is when. They may go next month or they may never go. Plenty of people here with 200k & 300K with no problems. Change your coolant every 2-3 years.

zonie77
09-03-10, 12:51 PM
As far as the manual on CD, I got the paper manuals. I use manuals on CD at work and like paper better, but the search on the CD's can be great. It comes down to paper or plastic (sorry, I had to do it).

Maybe someone who has bought the CD can let you know if it's as good as the manual or Alldata.

Submariner409
09-03-10, 01:06 PM
AoD, Once more, with feeling: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Study as much as you possibly can in Seville, Deville, Northstar Performance, and Discussions. Read the entire Cadillac Technical Archive up in the black bar ^^, especially the article "Occasional full throttle operation is good for your engine".

Read your owner's manual, maintain the car, do not use snake oils and magic potions in the oil, coolant or fuel, use 87 octane unless you're going to the strip or trailer towing (the PCM will NOT "compensate" for higher octane fuels), follow the OLM and enjoy the car.

Your engine does not have separate coils or wires - all 4 coils for each bank are in a cassette unit. The engine takes ACDelco #41-987 Platinum plugs ONLY.

Subscribe your car to www.alldatadiy.com for a year - try it. More info on your particular car than you can ever use.

AoD
09-04-10, 12:17 AM
No I haven't changed the plugs. That was order 2 after the radiator. I've been obsessively studying everything I possibly can about this car since before I put the money down on it.

I have a habit of trying to over-do repairs, for instance, my struts are still ok, and I have already started budgeting for their replacement.. with OEM parts. I never have bad results from that method, but I usually end up doing far more work than I needed to.

My POS '87 buick runs, and rides, like a brand new car BTW :) It's just horribly ugly and won't idle due to a failed IAC.

I guess that means I've done it again, without even having the car in my garage yet.. heh. I worried myself stupid thinking I might have screwed myself buying a car that would inevitably have HG failure because of all the hype. Go me. :D

Thanks. I feel better about the whole thing. I only NEED it to run long enough to put together about 1500 bucks to do the job in case it happens anyway. That won't take that long.

BTW I read up on WOT being so good for your N* a while back, seeing that here, there, and a whole host of other places and credible sources really made me smile. I have a buddy who was whooping his dad's '05 Deville pretty damn hard, I was in the car a couple times.. man could that big sedan haul ass.

Granted it wasn't very friendly to other systems in the car, I'm just glad to know the engine was designed specifically to be utilized to it's full potential with frequency.

AoD
09-04-10, 01:05 AM
This looks pretty legit..
http://www.autorepairmanuals.biz/site/573683/product/GMP00K1-2-3

Submariner409
09-04-10, 10:47 AM
BTW I read up on WOT being so good for your N* a while back, seeing that here, there, and a whole host of other places and credible sources really made me smile. I have a buddy who was whooping his dad's '05 Deville pretty damn hard, I was in the car a couple times.. man could that big sedan haul ass.

Yes, some WOT work is "good" for your Northstar - performed intelligently and with moderation. There is currently another thread running, concerning an overheating Northstar vehicle, in which to owner says he was doing WOT's in 2nd and 3rd "for an hour" when the exhaust began to show black and oily smoke, so he did it again and the car rapidly overheated. < There is a point at which one can overdo a good thing................We own passenger cars, albeit powerful passenger cars, but they're NOT Indy cars and should not be driven that way.

Ranger
09-04-10, 10:50 AM
Good Lord. You can buy a set of FSM's brand new from http://www.helminc.com for $135. Much cheaper on Ebay.
This link for your car. http://www.helminc.com/helm/product2.asp?session=79E5CF8E1C6B483F9CEC37C69DB9B 32A&Make=CAD&Model=SEVL&Year=2000&Category=1&class_2=CAD&mk=Cadillac&yr=2000&md=Seville&dt=Shop%2FService+Information&module=&from=result&Style=helm&Sku=GMP00K&itemtype=N

Budgeting for a possible future failure is a wise thing to do. Just don't spend it unless you have to.

AoD
09-04-10, 08:33 PM
owner says he was doing WOT's in 2nd and 3rd "for an hour" when the exhaust began to show black and oily smoke, so he did it again and the car rapidly overheated.

FOR AN HOUR!!!

Go figure..

Yeah, I'm not going to do that. I'm confident that I can handle this vehicle and any idiosyncrasies that it may possess. The HG's are good and the tranny is GREAT according to my mechanic (he's a 30 year GM veteran and retired head mechanic at Walker Bros. GM Dealer, also my best homie's dad), I'll be able to piece things back to new condition slowly, a bit at a time, over the course of a two month period. Once I'm done with the repairs that I deem "necessary", the car will run perfectly and I'll be the proud owner of my very first luxury car... a Cadillac, no less.. man, am I F***ing stoked...

Thanks for all the advice folks. I am quite sure that I'll be back here pestering you with questions once I actually have the car towed to my house to start working on it.