: Who boats?



I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-22-10, 08:56 PM
Being a resident of Minnesota (the land of 10,000 lakes), a lot of summer is often spent on a boat. I do not have one, but one of my best friends has a 18 foot Larson boat we use for cruising the lakes, or wake boarding/ skiing and tubing.

It's a lot like this:
http://www.larsonboats.com/lx/1850/

It's equipped with a 3.0L Volvo sourced four cylinder (115hp?), and it doesn't really go more than 40 mph, but that's all the more we need for the size of lakes we see, and you don't need to go more than 20-25 to ski or tube.

It's always a great afternoon to go out on the lake, with a 12 pack of Corona, and drink, swim and tube (I can't ski or board, never could on water, asphalt or snow). :)

Another friend of mine has a 20 foot Ski Nautique, which is designed to be a pure ski boat. It's got a 351 Windsor, mounted inboard which is pushing out around 320hp, so it's VERY fast and very nimble. It's literally like a Mustang for the water. I've only been on it once, but man was that fun. I think they retail new for like $65,000.
http://www.nautiques.com/models/spec200closed

So yeah, I'm a big fan of motorboating! :cool2: ;)

Jesda
08-22-10, 09:22 PM
Ive actually been pondering a kayak. I heard boats were prohibitively expensive to own, making European cars seem like Hondas by comparison.

Florian
08-22-10, 10:45 PM
Ive owned 3.....happy to be rid of them all.

F

Bro-Ham
08-22-10, 11:20 PM
I've owned two boats. First one was back in 1991 when I was fresh out of college - a 1983 Century 26 foot cabin cruiser with a 350 V8. While in college I worked part time as an executive director of a small non-profit corporation and thought a boat would be a good idea and one of the business owners in our building had a slip available to rent to me at a cool yacht club in downtown Stillwater, MN, where the folks were crazy and there was (still is) a wild bar known for live music and attracting drunken boaters and Harley riders. Exciting stuff! This first boat was big enough to party it up and also do some schmoozing. I convinced my business partner to be to go into business with me after a day long boat trip with enormous steaks on the beach and cocktails, cocktails, cocktails. There is magic aboard floating toys. :)

The funny thing about being young is that you're never satisfied and there isn't much that can stand in the way of youthful "I can do anything" determination. So, while putting out of the harbor my first day behind the wheel of the boat, I saw a row of three very nice much larger sized boats, one of them had the canvas taken down and a cocktail party was going on. I saw these good time havers serving themselves cocktails from the neatest boat deck cocktail bar I had ever seen - it was simple but so extravagant. These boats had classic lines and the look of total luxury. I found out these boats were Chris-Craft Catalina 381's and there was also a similar Chris-Craft Catalina 350 - all from the mid 1980's.

Something snapped at that instant - that was it! I just HAD to have one! And it would be by the next summer, the 1992 season - no screwing around - I would make it happen no matter what it took! This was back when I was crazy working 24/7 making deals day and night on my Motorola cell phone that was as big as my head. I found a zany boat broker and tracked a super nice example of one of these boats down (after looking as far as Florida and New York): a 1986 Chris-Craft Catalina 381 - complete with the upper deck bar, which I found out had a unique smoked plexiglass top that folded up to reveal a nifty cocktail sink and ice maker underneath too! That wasn't all - it had two of everything good: two engines (dual 454 Crusader inboards at 350 hp each/700 total), two gas tanks (410 gallons total - gas was only $1.55/gal year after year, still expensive at the time), two staterooms (master had a king, guest had a comfortable full), two bathrooms (master had tub and shower, guest just a shower), and of course, two bars (the one on the upper deck and a nice sized inside bar with barstools in the galley).

I bought the boat through my broker from a funeral director in Chicago, they had it moored in Michigan on Lake Michigan and used it as a floating condo and apparently didn't use it as a boat much because it only had 110 hours when I bought it - it was only six years old - that's like a six year old car with 10,000 miles.

Anyway, this boat made quite an introduction when pulling in to the yacht clubs and restaurants along the St. Croix River, and for the 4 or so months a year it was usable in Minnesota, I got quite a bit of pleasure from it and had a quite a few business associates eating out of my hand making deals with me so they could have the pleasure of being invited out. Good times, good times! :)

In 1995 I was approached by a boat broker who had a buyer who wanted my specific boat - it was lovely. They made me an offer I couldn't refuse and I accepted it. It was a ton of money to play that game and yet it was also a ton of fun, and very useful in getting up to speed fast in business. I bought my first house and intended to get back on the water but haven't yet. I only regret that I only slept over night on that big boat a handful of times and also regret that I didn't keep it and bring it to Florida since it would have made the most awesome of tropical residences. Once I'm situated in the funeral business I'll own another big boat and live aboard since being on the water, and life at the yacht club, is awesome. I've had enough of houses and condos. :)

It is fun to have a cocktail barge and there is no better business tool and impressive introduction to yourself than a super huge floating toy! :)

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-22-10, 11:51 PM
I'm starting to get really interested in boats, and the brand I'm really starting to like is Chris-Craft. They're the ones that made the fast and sexy all wood boats back from the 1920's-50s, and they still carry on the tradition nowadays. They're kinda like the Rolls Royce of boats, as they're very luxurious, very stylish, very exclusive and very expensive. I was going to go out to a nearby dealer to look at Chris-Crafts this weekend, just for fun, but I didn't have time. Maybe this weekend..

Bro-Ham
08-23-10, 12:00 AM
I miss my Chris. They were very exclusive, Rolls-Royce like, and went mainstream in the 1950's and became Cadillac like. My 1986 was an awesome boat and one of the last before the downfall of Chris-Craft in the late 1980's, several years after the Smith family sold the company. The current company that came out of the ashes makes real, top notch boats again, equivalent to Rolls-Royce in spectacularness, factory is in Sarasota.

orconn
08-23-10, 12:02 AM
I started sailing when I was 10 years old. I got my first boat when I was twelve. All my training was in sailboats, but because motor boats were necessary to service the sailboats and friends families had some very nice (today they are "classic" Chris Crafts and Century wooden speedboats from the fifties) speedboats for water skiing I became pretty proficient in the operation of motorboats too. At that time I was sailing on the Delaware River, Barnegat Bay and the Chessapeake ... and since there, very often, isn't a lot of "air" (wind to non sailors) I spent quite a bit of time on the speedboats or on my friend's dad's 36 foot Egg Harbor sportfisher. I also had a lot of cool sailing in Brazil and crewed there for some of the top Olympic sailors of the day. As I was stationed around the world I would always head for the local yacht club, if there was one, and could usually find a ride or someone in need of a crew. Hence I sailed from and beacme a member of the "Upper Nile Yacht Club" at Khartoum, Sudan and sailed on both the White and Blue Nile Rivers. The yacht in Khartoum was located in an old Nile River Steamer that was moored out in from of the best hotel in the city ... pretty swanky by 1960's African standards. I also sailed on the Red Sea, but more often went sport fishing on the 42' foot Matthews sport fisher that you the good American taxpayer kept for us to check incoming shipments to our base up on the plateau in Asmara in what is now Eritrea.

When back in California in the 1970's I crewed alot on off shore sailboats and eventually went into partnership with a friend on a 36' Islander sloop. Had that for about five years.

When my son was ten years old he chose horse back riding lesson as his Christmas present (major mistake on my part). The kid turned out to be a gifted natural rider (like his grandfather, I had forgotten about that) and within a year that was the end of my sailing (I had already sold my half of the Islander to my friend). To be honest, you have to be a lot better healed than I was to afford both boats and horses! Horses won out and we spent ten years in the world of equestrian competition. Now if you think boats are expensive (and they are), horses make most boats look like cheap change.

So if you are ever tempted to buy a boat .... do yourself a favor get a friend with a boat!

gdwriter
08-23-10, 12:23 AM
I already have one money pit. I don't need a boat.

Night Wolf
08-23-10, 01:29 AM
I -really- enjoy being on the water.

Growing up, my father restored a 1974 (iirc) Sea-Ray 190 ski boat, 18' with a Ford 4bbl 302. We would use it on the Hudson River in NY. The propeller on it was setup for water sking, which made the thing accelerate like no other, but not have much of a top end, along with consume fuel at an even faster rate it otherwise did, he later got a cruise prop which made the boat more enjoyable and economical for what we did. He painted the outside, redid the interior, new stainless etc... Really nice boat for going out for the day. IIRC the fastest we go it up to at one time was 63mph, which was freakin fast. It was similar to these:

http://www2.ablboats.com/images/listings/729/7290603.jpg

http://www.thehulltruth.com/attachments/great-lakes/77265d1244651122-pics-fresh-water-boats-im000268.jpg

I just enjoy being on/near the water. My mother and stepfather in FL have two kayaks that we use on the river, I'd like to get a pair myself.

Once when I lived in Florida I rented a 16' Boston Whaler for the day and took it out on the Gulf. It was a very simple boat with a small outboard, was a consol setup with a canapoy and had a CD stereo system. That to me was the perfect little "fun" boat, not too much but enough to put some people on, cruise around, jam out to tunes and have a great day.

After that, the idea of my own small boat like that was really appealing. Then I rented a nice 3-person SeaDoo personal watercraft when in Key West, and that was a blast. It was a different type of fun then the boat, and I am not sure which would suit me better, but I liked it alot.

Since then I have been keeping an eye out for a jetskit/small boat. A small but fun boat that I can tow with the Jeep really has my interest, other then that a PWC. The idea of loading up the Jeep with gear and a PWC/small boat and taking it down to central/south Florida for an extended weekend really grabs my interest. This year the goal is to get the car completed, but maybe in a year or two I'll find something.

Jesda
08-23-10, 01:35 AM
What is it about boating that makes it so darn expensive? Its just a tub with a motor on it, right? What goes wrong?

ThumperPup
08-23-10, 01:56 AM
I love boats havn't had mine out on the watter in about 6 years due to the fact that well its fiberglass its also a formula 31c and well it's got more damage to it then i could aford due to 2 drunk smucks droping it in the watter when it was suposed to be heading to the repair yard and then the INS saying they are not paying so it really sucks lol but love them


the reason its so exspensive Who the F knows lol
i guess because they think that the ones who get nice boats are the ones who have lots of money
take the 31c i got it as an inhertance brand new it was 420k i think now it would sell if floatable lol for 200k i think

shoot even a 1979 seray i sean them for sale now for like 25k for a 30 year old boat

you know you can buy a used cruise ship from Carnival or Princes for like 5million lol

Night Wolf
08-23-10, 02:28 AM
What is it about boating that makes it so darn expensive? Its just a tub with a motor on it, right? What goes wrong?

...... Sometimes that logic dosen't work, an extreme but common example would be a Harley - I don't understand how something so basic can leak so much, break down, require often maintenance and be so frickin expensive.... yet it is, not only do people glady pay for it and deal with it, but they seem to thrive off of it.

Playdrv4me
08-23-10, 05:14 AM
A good friend of mine summed up boats the best:

...The best days of boat ownership are the day you buy it and the day you get rid of it...

From everything I've witnessed, truer words could not have been spoken.

Submariner409
08-23-10, 08:59 AM
I boat for fun and I boat for a living (ocean delivery captain).

A boat is your private hole in the water into which you throw money.

Here's ours - a 1969 wood Bloodsworth Chesapeake Bay box-stern deadrise; converted crab boat. Tricked out Olds 455 by yours truly............

Florian
08-23-10, 09:27 AM
I'm starting to get really interested in boats, and the brand I'm really starting to like is Chris-Craft. They're the ones that made the fast and sexy all wood boats back from the 1920's-50s, and they still carry on the tradition nowadays. They're kinda like the Rolls Royce of boats, as they're very luxurious, very stylish, very exclusive and very expensive. I was going to go out to a nearby dealer to look at Chris-Crafts this weekend, just for fun, but I didn't have time. Maybe this weekend..

I owned a 24' Chris.....mine was a 63 Sea Skiff...a great boat. 283 Chevy - it got up and scooted. But your statement about them being the MB of boats is about as far from the truth as possible. Even back in the day they were the Chevys of the waterways. Plenty to be had and very affordable...

F

Bro-Ham
08-23-10, 10:45 AM
I owned a 24' Chris.....mine was a 63 Sea Skiff...a great boat. 283 Chevy - it got up and scooted. But your statement about them being the MB of boats is about as far from the truth as possible. Even back in the day they were the Chevys of the waterways. Plenty to be had and very affordable...

F

I think you need to educate yourself on Chris-Craft. Chris Smith made his name creating the best crafted and fastest mahogany boats. They did eventually make a boat in every size and for every budget, including do it yourself boat kits, but they were never regarded as low end or every day and were known for their superb quality and prestigious boats for upper middle class folks, like today's Mercedes or yesterday's Cadillac. The Smith family sold out about 50 years ago and the company had some ups and downs but the current owners are making boats that are top notch all the way and, like the originals, are out of reach except for those who want and can afford the best. :)

EcSTSatic
08-23-10, 11:46 AM
I have a 26' sailboat. I usually can go all sailing season on about 3 gallons of gas. This past weekend was perfect, even did some night sailing under an almost full moon. The stinkpots pretty much stay off after dark.

67598

hueterm
08-23-10, 12:25 PM
Chad, you could buy like 3 MINT '87 Town Cars for what it would take to buy, operate, maintain, and store a boat....for a year. Plus, it's too freakin' cold up there to use it for more than like 4 months............

Or one of the '80s TCs and an LT-1 powered F-body.......

Just rent one for the day if you have to go boating, or better yet, persuade one of your dimmer, more expendable friends to buy one so you can use it. When it bleeds him dry and he then hates you, no big loss... ;-)

cvettr/cts-v
08-23-10, 02:34 PM
What is it about boating that makes it so darn expensive? Its just a tub with a motor on it, right? What goes wrong?

Most upkeep can be done yourself if you wish to try and save money. Either way you want to keep up on all maintenance. It is not like youjsut walk for help if you Break down. If your not under power you have very little control. On the roads in a vehicle you can see and avoid most obsticles. In a boat things lurk just below the suface that can cause injury and costly damage. I allow anyone to drink on our boat except me, I drive and am responsible for everyones safety. There are too many other idiot boat owners who just get sloshed and drive irratically. Fuel is for us the largest cost. It is more than at a land based station and at the lake of the ozarks where our boat is people have had issues with land based gas stations fuel. Boats are heavy and consume large amounts of fuel to get them upto and maintain speed. We figure about $150.00 to $300.00 a weekend in fuel. Then you have winterization, de-winterization, oil changes, impeller changes, lifejackets and all the required safety stuff all adds up. As said the best boat to be on is one owned and paid for by someone else but I prefer the convience of owning my own and being able to use it when and where I want rather than waiting to be invited. We have a 2003 Monterey ss268 with a 496 mercruser and bravo3 duoprop ordered and bought new still looks and performs as new.

nikon
08-23-10, 03:08 PM
I loooooove boating....Especially in florida, it's pretty much year round.

Here's mine, 93' 202 Wellcraft nova spyder...good for about 60mph....and yes they break alot...but I love it either way.

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v3352/163/60/1775142986/n1775142986_2705_1756948.jpg

Don't mind the stains under the exhaust, just haven't gotten around to acid washing the stains off.

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs112.snc4/35979_1158158212201_1775142986_300206_6330632_n.jp g

orconn
08-23-10, 05:02 PM
...... Sometimes that logic dosen't work, an extreme but common example would be a Harley - I don't understand how something so basic can leak so much, break down, require often maintenance and be so frickin expensive.... yet it is, not only do people glady pay for it and deal with it, but they seem to thrive off of it.

Yeah, Porsches fall into the same category!

dkozloski
08-23-10, 05:31 PM
Boats are really fun if they have wings on them. I flew my Cessna 180 on floats for more than thirty years and enjoyed every minute. Along the way I removed the original 225HP carbureted engine and replaced it with a 260HP fuel injected version and that increased the utility even more.

Silver Salmon one weekend in the Togiak River, Shee fish the next in the Kobuk, and Rainbow Trout the next in the Tik Chiks. Life was good.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-23-10, 05:47 PM
Oh I wasn't saying I was gonna go out and buy a boat any time in the near future, I just like to dream about the things I'd buy if I ever made it rich. A Chris-Craft and a Wanderlodge are right up there.

orconn
08-23-10, 07:20 PM
I boat for fun and I boat for a living (ocean delivery captain).

A boat is your private hole in the water into which you throw money.

Here's ours - a 1969 wood Bloodsworth Chesapeake Bay box-stern deadrise; converted crab boat. Tricked out Olds 455 by yours truly............

That is one cool boat, perfect for a days outing on the Chesapeake. I alway had an admiration for those old work boats. The sail powered oyster boats are cool tool with their low freeboards and beautiful bows.
Does you boat qualify for the work boat races?

Submariner409
08-23-10, 07:29 PM
Yes, it does, but I never raced it, only did a few docking contests: At the gun you throw off the lines, leave a bulkhead, scream across a couple hundred feet of harbor, spin around and back into a slip while throwing one mooring line over a stern piling. Shortest time wins. Never won - the guys who run their boats 24/7 are just too incredibly good at close-quarters handling. I'm no slouch, but no match for a professional Bay waterman. I'll stick to building their engines..........

The Olds burns 3 gph at 8.5 knots(1850 rpm) so we can cruise all day and night on the 55 gallons aboard - but run her up to 21 knots/4400 rpm and fuel use goes to about 16 gph.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-23-10, 07:35 PM
Jim, what's that putting out for power? How easy is it to convert an engine designed for automotive use to marine use?

Stingroo
08-23-10, 07:41 PM
^ I've always wondered that. I remember my dad bought an LT1 powered boat when I was really young and kept it until I started school. No idea what brand it was. Something-craft... but I doubt Chris-Craft. Boats aren't my area of expertise.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-23-10, 09:04 PM
It was probably a Master Craft, they make sporty/boarding/skiing boats, a lot like Nautique.
http://www.mastercraft.com/

Florian
08-23-10, 11:31 PM
I think you need to educate yourself on Chris-Craft. Chris Smith made his name creating the best crafted and fastest mahogany boats. They did eventually make a boat in every size and for every budget, including do it yourself boat kits, but they were never regarded as low end or every day and were known for their superb quality and prestigious boats for upper middle class folks, like today's Mercedes or yesterday's Cadillac. The Smith family sold out about 50 years ago and the company had some ups and downs but the current owners are making boats that are top notch all the way and, like the originals, are out of reach except for those who want and can afford the best. :)

Not only did I own one...and I owned it for its craftsmanship, but I did a pile of research before I bought it. They were Chevys of their time...no question about it. Our band plays the CC reunion every year and we see just about every model CC made...the old ones arent appreciating, the fiberglass ones are a dime a dozen and the new ones arent considered CCs....they are post Smith CCs and are targeted to elite owners....nothing like the old days.

F

93DevilleUSMC
08-23-10, 11:33 PM
I motorboat.

Bro-Ham
08-24-10, 12:16 AM
Not only did I own one...and I owned it for its craftsmanship, but I did a pile of research before I bought it. They were Chevys of their time...no question about it. Our band plays the CC reunion every year and we see just about every model CC made...the old ones arent appreciating, the fiberglass ones are a dime a dozen and the new ones arent considered CCs....they are post Smith CCs and are targeted to elite owners....nothing like the old days.

F

Rolls-Royces aren't appreciating either. :) The grand CC's, which, in my view, are the only worthwhile models, and are classics of their time, like great Cadillacs, and measuring CC's only by inconsequential models, and there were a few, is your prerogative. Your narrow view is equivalent to judging Cadillac by the Cimarron or Catera. :)

hueterm
08-24-10, 12:18 AM
So do they make the Chris Craft in all wood anymore, or just fiberglass w/wood trim?

The wood ones are pretty neat looking.

orconn
08-24-10, 12:20 AM
Back in the days of wooden boats, all privatley leisure craft were truly luxuty items. For example a 21 foot Lippincott "Star Class" sailboat (strictly for day racing, no accommodations or head) cost $6700. in 1955. The average American family of four had an annual income $4500. so ownership of a boat for the majority of Americans wasn't possiblbe.

Wooden Chris Craft boats of that ere were well made, but their true strength was in their beautiful design and their relative affordability (still not cheap, but less than something like a Wheeler, a Hutchins or Shepherd, which were the Cadillacs and Rolls of this class of boats). But for shear beauty Chris-Crafts were hard to beat. The "Clipper Bow" designs of the fifties, whether applied to speedboats or cabin cruisers were real knockouts, especially when finished in red mahogany with contrasting light wood trim and gold painted accents like the 1956 Chris-Craft Cobra speedboat. But Chris-Craft boats were designed for use on lakes and rivers, really in the interior of the U.S. They were not desirable in any kind of heavy weather, or for use where swells over three feet could be encountered. That is why they are so popular along the Inland Waterway of Florida and on up the East Coast. This is also why so many Chrissy cabin cruisers spend their life as "drinkers" (tied to a dock and used for cocktails and entertaining, but rarely if ever leaving their slip). You don't see many Chris Chraft cruisers in California, and hardly ever outside the breakwater, cause it's very uncomfortable to "wallow" around in the larger swells.

It was only after the proliferation of fiberglass hulls and eventually cabins, in the 1960's that pleasure boats became financially affordable to the American middle class and you had the proliferation of marinas and a wide variety of types of boats and a much wider price range of these boats.

In the last few years the higher cost of fuel has really cut into the use of power boats and has also had an impact on sailing as well. A good friend of mine, who teaches keelboat sailing in the Barnegate Bay tells me his business has been of for over two years. There are also alot of boats for sale at deeply depressed prices due to the economy.

Bro-Ham
08-24-10, 12:37 AM
Orr, Chris-Craft was a great lakes and Florida boat. Not many made it to the left coast because the folks there probably were too busy saving the whales or partaking in no-nuke protests to be cocktailing on their fine motoryachts. CC's aren't a Hatteras, the true epitome of motoryachting, but they are nevertheless very cool and quite fine to putt around on and the ride is glass smooth and you'll never spill your drink. :)

sk7
08-24-10, 08:17 PM
Wish I could use it more, got about 10 hrs runtime in the last 4 years... But enjoyed every minute of it!
http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq102/sk7_1969/F233LS/IMG_3121.jpg

1983 Formula F233LS