: Noelle turns 21 this month, time to celebrate!



Night Wolf
07-30-10, 09:49 AM
Shes a 1990, with a build date of 7/89 - two years to the month younger then I.

She's been on jackstands for over a year now. For a long time under a cover, tarp and with stuff piled around her. Several things got in the way and then "out of sight, out of mind" kicked in. Finally having enough, I made getting her back on the road the priority again.

Before I started working on the car again, I told myself I need to organize all my tools and clean out the shed. The shed also needed work, it was a 5x7' eyesore with a "porch" (used to be a playhouse for kids) I made it into a 7x7' small workshop. Leaking roof has a tarp for now. It's still an eye sore, but atleast it is a useful eyesore. Once the car is done, the shed will be completed.

I moved all my tool boxes into the shed and organized all my tools, along with cleaned and organized everything else that went into the shed. Then I built a basic work bench, I'll get a vice, grinder etc... within time. Where the 3 2x4's are, is where the front wall used to be. I moved it to the edge of the "foundation" and then extended the walls. Not pretty right now, but much more useful.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle010.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle011.jpg

The car has pretty much been sitting since I last worked on it, in the fall. I dropped the rear subframe, slide it aside the car..... and left it. A later point in time I removed the subframe from the trailing arms and burned out the old rubber bushings, but that was it. The rest of the rear suspension sat outside, under a set of spare Jeep soft doors for the last 10 months. The whole area is a mess from last fall's leaves and just junk from being stagnant.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle020.jpg

The night before I went into the car itself and cleaned out all the trash and junk that was just sitting in there.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle025.jpg

M20B25, for this project she is pretty much staying as is. Already has new cap and rotor (I could see/hear a difference just on the jackstands, old were original and worn) and still need to put the new set of spark plug wires on. Other then that it is staying for now. Waterpump super kit (including timing belt) is in the near future, but not until shes driving again.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle028.jpg

Started to clean the junk up from around the car.... the Snapper and Cub Cadet are also projects, but like the other projects, are on hold til the car is done. I still need to find a place for them to wait.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle030.jpg

My house only had 2 exterior power outlets and both were part of other 15-amp service within the house. Running my air compressor kept popping breakers and it was inconvient to work on the car without power nearby. One recent weekend my stepfather taught me some things about home AC power (of which I had no experience with) and we installed two, dedicated 20-amp lines for car stuff. Like I said, last fall's leaves, it's a mess.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle031.jpg

Under the car was worse

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle034.jpg

I also hooked up the battery and decided to let the engine run a bit. Loud, as there is no exhaust after the manifolds, but I wanted to keep the battery charged.

Step 1:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle035.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle036.jpg

Much improved:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle037.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle039.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle041.jpg

But, I like clean working conditions, so I went further...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle043.jpg

While it was out, I also decided to wash the car, first time shes been washed in over a year...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle045.jpg

Jesda
07-30-10, 10:02 AM
I like your workshop. I never work on my own cars anymore, unfortunately. Every damn joint and muscle ends up being sore for a week. Some of my newest neighbors now include children, so I worry about walking back inside to get a drink or something while kids futz around with the car and get injured.

I don't care about the kids, just the liability.

Night Wolf
07-30-10, 10:13 AM
The blue top is from the '92 318iC I had for a bit. I switched the entire top/frame. The black top was in better shape, as the blue top rear window stitching is bad, and the blue top in general is worn, but this top frame is a much better fit on the car and feels tighter/less worn. It is fine for now, but a new top (to the tune of $1,000 parts/labor) is in the future... again, priority is to get her driving again.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle046.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle047.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle049.jpg

She still shines up good, this was just a basic wash. With the exception of the passenger fender, the paint is original, non-clearcoat too. Thats the main reason why I don't want to repaint the car, hard to beat a factory paint job. She has so many little dents and dings tho, I've thought about just getting the passenger fender repainted (which has peeling clear coat) and as many of the dings fixed by paintless dent repair, but we'll see.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle050.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle051.jpg

On to working on the car now...

First up was to remove the CV axles from the trailing arms

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle053.jpg

This made the job quick and easy

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle054.jpg

Which did this

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle057.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle058.jpg

Then to remove the axles from the diff

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle059.jpg

Stock e30 axles are very stout. Mine are in good condition, but the boots are torn. Both axles will be getting all new boots and regreased. One of the rear wheel bearings in the trailing arms is making noise, so both will be getting replaced.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle060.jpg

The diff is going to stay it's a medium-case (6cyl) 3.73 with factory 2-way limited slip. The limited slip still works well, so a full rebuild is going to wait. I am going to remove the cover, inspect the gears, then both axle seals are getting replaced and maybe the driveshaft seal. As with all the other little odds and ends, it's going to be cleaned and painted before it goes back on the car.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle062.jpg

Next up was to remove the old rubber trailing arm bushings. I already have new poly trailing arm (and subframe) bushings... had them about a year now...

Made a tool

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle068.jpg

BAM!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle069.jpg

Little pile of junk collection. Brake lines are old and all 6 flexible sections are getting replaced with coated stainless steel braided lines. The pads/rotors are actually good, so they will stay for now but I am going to rebuild all 4 calipers along with a new parking brake cable and new parking brake shoes/hardware.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/7-26-10/BMWrearaxle072.jpg

I'm glad to be working on the car again. I felt overwhelmed because there was so much to do on it, but once I cleaned everything up, organized the stuff, made a list of what I still need and just started doing one thing at a time, even if it is small - now the project dosen't seem so bad and I'm eager to finish it.

hueterm
07-30-10, 10:20 AM
What happened to your white E30?

Night Wolf
07-30-10, 10:55 AM
What happened to your white E30?

I sold it. The only reason why I bought it was because I missed driving the e30 so much it was quicker/easier to buy another one then fix the one I had - impulsive descion.

3 cars was too much, again. The white one quickly became a project of it's own tho and it was stopping me from working on the red one. I bought it for $1800, did alot of work to it, replaced alot of parts, put 10k on it and sold it for $3200. I know the person that bought it, several months later he said the (dual mass) flywheel went bad and clutch was worn (tho grabbed fine), I'm glad I didn't end up putting more money and work into it. Some parts were robbed from the red car, but they'll be getting upgraded anyway.

I will say tho, that M42 (DOHC 1.8L) was very advanced for it's day and was a total blast. 7000RPM and the convertible-specific 4.27 gears (non-lsd tho) made it a very fun daily drive that got 30mpg.

I am so partial to these things, and enjoy working on them. Dropping the rear subframe is considered one of the most difficult tasks on an e30, and to me it wasn't "too" bad. Once Noelle is done, I'd like to do it again, the car of choice would be a '91 318is tho.... I need to keep telling myself to not even look until the red car is driving again.

After not touching the thing for nearly 10-months, within 15mins of working on it, I knew why I like these cars so much, everything just feels "right" it's hard to explain. I feel like if I can't save every e30, then I need to build up a personal collection... I like the 318is tho, its got its own cult following, and the actual roof and 4cyl would be a fun change from the convertible.

She will be getting lowered on H&R Sport springs with Bilstein Sport shocks, but her main job will be a daily driver and roadtrip car, I just like driving it so much not to drive it often.

With 140k on her now, all the normal wear items are being replaced, this car is getting a new life. Engine/trans/diff are solid and will go for many more miles. Once this car is done, I am going to drive the heck outta it, miles be damned, it's getting driven, often. That is part of the reason why I am very hesistant to do much with the body/paint/cosmetics. It is not a show car, it's going to be a driver... and I'd rather not spend alot of money making it look prestine, only to have a day to day incident that messes it up.

Money being put into it dosen't matter to me either. As far as I am concerned, take any new fun "sporty" convertible on the market today, most are $25-$40k. This car gives me the same, if not more amounts of fun, in a rare package, that I just fell in love with so much. May not be the fastest, but it's fast enough. It all started when I test drove a then-new Pontiac Solstice GXP and really enjoyed the experience, but couldn't justify $30k.

I paid $2,500 for this car, when all said an done (not counting new convertible top etc...) I may have another $2,500 into it (probably counting a new set of tires in there too) and for $5k I'll have a mechanically new/very durable good looking fun convertible. The plan is to take the thing on roadtrips anywhere I can. It is so much fun and very comfortable for extended highway driving. 24-28 highway MPG (before the tuneup and work) is so much better then 15mpg from the Jeep too. Plus, I'll get places faster, but within legal limits. The Jeep likes 65-70mph, the BMW enjoyes 80-85, which in many cases is keeping with traffic (around here).... I'm looking forward on taking it on trips back to New York and out West etc...

gary88
07-30-10, 12:43 PM
I suggest some style 5s to go with the drop.

http://a.imageshack.us/img840/1893/89dsm35o.jpg

Have you joined BMW CCA yet?

Jesda
07-30-10, 01:49 PM
I suggest some style 5s to go with the drop.

http://a.imageshack.us/img840/1893/89dsm35o.jpg

Have you joined BMW CCA yet?

:drool:

gdwriter
07-30-10, 03:10 PM
That shed looks like a hacked-off single-wide trailer. :histeric: But they definitely come in handy. When my sister left for Alabama, she gave me their shed, which is big enough for my lawnmower, something the useless POS shed my ex built couldn't accommodate. So glad to get that bloody thing out of the garage between the cars. Still need to tear down the useless shed and her trailer-park special patio cover. I got my sister's back patio gazebo, too.

ejguillot
07-30-10, 10:30 PM
Rick,

Nice to see you're working on getting your classic BMW back on the road. Just don't get any more $300+ tickets! :duck:

Night Wolf
07-30-10, 11:38 PM
I suggest some style 5s to go with the drop.

http://a.imageshack.us/img840/1893/89dsm35o.jpg

Have you joined BMW CCA yet?

IIRC does the e30M3 have a different bolt pattern then regular e30? I don't remember if they are 4lug. Those look like the BBS RS wheels, which means ultra expensive.

I've got a set of the factory bottlecaps, which I may paint for now. I also have a set of aftermarket wheels that may look good painted but don't have center caps. and I don't like the dual bolt pattern setup they have going on.

I think I'd like to keep it looking fairly stock tho, and optional were the BBS basketweaves:

http://members.roadfly.org/randywalters/Sheldon%20325is%20LR%20reduced.jpg

I could pick up a nice set for not too much money.

I'm already over budget on it, and I haven't even bought the $900 spring/shock set yet, so wheels and tires are going to be last for now, I may just find a cheap set to throw on the bottlecaps, see if I can find a set of wheels/tires or keep an eye out for basketweaves. Gotta rep the 14's! :burn:

Plus, I kinda wanna just get a cheap set of tires at first cause I know I'm gonna wanna do some dumb things that'll burn off new tires rather quickly.... nothing too crazy, just to make sure the limited slid diff still locks well and the new parking brake hardware works....at speed... in case I ever needed to slow the car down with it....

I have not signed up with BMW CCA yet. Once the car is in tip top mechanical condition, I'd really like to take it to Road Atlanta and be able to legally push it to its limits as well as go to a driving school with it.

A convertible isn't the idea chassis to do it in, while BMW beefed up the cabrios in a few areas they are said to be flexyfliers. But I am not building this car to be a dedicated track car or to win any events. Any performance driving or events I take it to will be to sharpen my driving skills. This is going to be one heck of a fun daily driver. Not showroom perfect, not a show car or a dedicated track car, just a fun daily driver built how I want, by me, that I will know inside and out and don't have to worry about parking it somewhere unattended or putting miles on it. I want to learn the limits of the car, then go beyond them and improve my driving skills.

The best handling car I've driver yet would be my '92 318iC with stock springs and Monroe sensatrac shocks (like not even factory quality) on what felt like worn suspension bushings, and that thing handled surperbly (to me) so the red car will be a whole different animal when I'm done with it. Once it's driving again I am going to get an underbody X-brace (all e36 convertibles came factory with them) with skid plate for oil pan, that is said to make the convertible chassis 85% as stiff as a hardtop. An upper strut brace will also be in there somewhere..

Night Wolf
07-31-10, 12:09 AM
Rick,

Nice to see you're working on getting your classic BMW back on the road. Just don't get any more $300+ tickets! :duck:

One of the reasons I enjoy daily driving the Jeep so much, I tend to stick to the speed limits, or close to them :).

Night Wolf
08-01-10, 01:14 AM
Yeah, the shed looks pretty dumpy still. I first considered tearing it down but covered storage space is at a premium so I left it. I fixed some of the damaged areas, still some to fix (roof etc...) and it'll be getting painted, but until the car is driving again, it'll wait.

I don't work tomorrow so I'll have a whole day to dedicate to the car. Since I have all the parts needed to rebuild the entire shifter linkage as well as install the Z3 1.9 shifter (much improved shoft shifter over stock) I am going to do that tomorrow as well as clean up and paint the rear diff, get it ready to replace the seals and store it until it's ready to go back in.

I took a video the same day I took the pictures of the first engine start in 6 months:

Q__t-PtiQ6g

It's very loud, hence the distortion from the mic. Flames out the exhaust manifolds are cool tho.

Night Wolf
08-02-10, 03:19 AM
Today was a productive day on the car, I got done what I wanted to - clean up and paint the diff and rebuild the shifter linkage/install new shifter.

The diff is still waiting for a new cover gasket and two outter shaft seals. After install of the shifter linkage I removed it as a whole to be able to replace the leaking selector shaft seal and output shaft seal on the transmission, then the shifter linkage can be installed for good.

To start with, my new keychain came in the mail the other day. I plan to get a real BMW key at some point too.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter001.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter002.jpg

The diff was a complete mess after 20 years of gunk buildup. I think the vent was clogged, which may have had something to do with the excessive leaks from the output seals. I first sprayed degreaser on it and used the pressure washer to blast whatever I could from it.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter003.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter004.jpg

But that wasn't enough, I used a screw driver to scrape all the crud off followed by several steel wire brushes to get all the crud and surface rust gone. I also removed the innter axle shafts. I removed what seemed like 5lbs of old gunked up grease from this thing. The old grease was so thick that it imbeded into the driveway, when I was all done I ran the pressure washer to clean the driveway up and some areas refuse to come clean.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter008.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter009.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter010.jpg

Then I removed the diff cover. It appears to be the first time it was ever removed. I like the drain and fill plugs on the cover, the Jeep only has fill plugs and the covered needs to be removed to drain the oil. I wanted to inspect the inside of the diff too, I was very surprised by how clean it was, there was no grime or anything on the inside of the cover, or much anywhere inside the diff. This was taken right after the cover came off.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter011.jpg

Night Wolf
08-02-10, 03:47 AM
Once all cleaned up it received some high-temp paint in the hi-tek paint lab

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter012.jpg

All the parts

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter014.jpg

temp installed until the seals arrive.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter017.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter021.jpg

The way I had it positioned, I wasn't able to get the very bottom of it. I'm sure it'll get some scrapes once attached to the subframe and getting put back in the car, so once it's in, it'll get a final touchup and those spots will be included.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter022.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter024.jpg

Then it was time to move on to the shifter linkage. The upper small shaft is the selector shaft, that seal will be getting replaced. I need to get a special thin walled 30mm deepwell socket to remove the flange on the output shaft, then I'll be able to change the output shaft seal. Both of these seals were leaking, which caused transmission oil to shoot all over the back of the transmission, I already cleaned alot of it up in the past, but it is still a mess.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter026.jpg

The leaks caused both transmission mounts to split right in half. The transmission cross member is in just to support the trans, but both mounts will obviously be replaced.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter028.jpg

I then unbolted the crossmember and lowered the transmission to gain more room to remove this clip, rightly reffered to in the e30 community as the "B*tch clip". That holds the front of the shifter carrir to the transmission, there is a rubber bushing between the clip and the carrier.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter029.jpg

Here is the rebuilt linkage. Every part that could wear, was trashed. On the right side of the picture, the "T" connector, on each side of that are a rubber o-ring and a yellow plastic washer - which simply put, were no longer there after 20 years.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter033.jpg

On the inside of the T connector is a foam/rubber spacer. It too no longest exists after 20 years

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter034.jpg

I then installed the linkage to try out my new Z3 1.9 shifter. With the exception of the circlip on the shifter end, and the locking ring slid over the dowel pin on the transmission end, this is all the way installed. The carrier sits on a rubber bushing at the front (on the b*tch clip) as well as a rubber bushing at the rear (the housing is the goldish thing at the very right). All of these parts were either totally worn, or simply missing before, which is why the shifter was so sloppy and would just flop around in a big circle when in gear. I also think that the trashed shifter linkage and split transmission mounts was causing the grinding when downshifting into 2nd, when the car is driving again I'll get to find out if it was the synchros being worn or not.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter035.jpg

The end result was throwing on the broken factory shift knob:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-1-10/BMWdiffshifter038.jpg

and making my own enigne sounds. It feels -very- nice. The throws are considerably shorter then stock - it actually feels like a performance car and less like the Jeep. It is very tight with little/no play at all when in gear. The old rubber dust boot, which provides the centering action was ripped in a few places, the new one keeps the shifter centered nice. I can't wait to drive the car with the short shifter and rebuilt linkage.

Night Wolf
08-06-10, 11:03 PM
I got a bit done today, the great thing about having everything cleaned up and organized like it is, is that I can start and stop pretty easy and only work on the car for a short time if needed. I was going to keep going, but some fast moving thunderstorms got me to put everything away before the downpour.

There is a flange held onto the output shaft of the transmission, the proper tool to remove it is a 30mm thinwall deepwell socket. It is not carried, well pretty much anywhere, except the e30/BMW parts stores online. The price? $45 - for something I am going to use once/e30.

I was ready to shell out the cash but it turns out Advance Auto has a "oil pressure sending unit socket" - 1-3/16" which is 30.16mm, it is thinwall, in stock and - $12 WOOHOO

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange001.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange002.jpg

This lockring gets removed

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange003.jpg

BAM! The electric impact made removing that nut cake.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange005.jpg

Then the flange can be pulled off, so I pulled out the harmonic balancer puller, had to go to the store to get nuts that fit.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange006.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange009.jpg

Both the output shaft seal and selector shaft seal are ready to be popped out, they will be getting replaced next week when the new ones arrive. When the flange is on the shaft, BMW specs to apply thread locker to the outside edges of the splines (not the threads) as oil can weep out along the splines, the threadlocker seals it. It's easy to see where the oil was getting slung all over from the leaking seals. I am going to check the vent and make sure it's not clogged, which would cause the seals to leak.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange007.jpg

Then I decided to put some of the interior back together, was going to throw the drivers door panel on (replaced the broken check strap) but the storm was moving in fast.

e30's are known for broken odometers, the drive gears break over time. When I bought this car, I watched (iirc 23 miles) the last turn as it stopped. Between that time and when I refreshed the cluster (including replacing the odo gears) I guestimate I put 5,000miles on the car (trips to FL etc...) and I want to figure actual miles, for my own reference. Once the odo was fixed, I put another 5k on it, which brought it to 135k. When I had the white BMW (which already had broken odometer gears) I swapped the cluster and put that "guessed" 5k miles on it, and removed it just before 140k, so as far as I am concerned, the 140k displayed is actual miles.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange011.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-6-10/driveshaftflange013.jpg

This morning I ordered $185 worth of parts from 2 companies that should be here later next week, seals for the diff and trans, CV boot kits and misc other things that should keep me held over until next payday when I'll have more disposable money to spend on the car.

93DevilleUSMC
08-07-10, 09:09 PM
Happy 21st to Noelle! She's got lots of potential to be a restored classic, and I wish you the best on your project.

Playdrv4me
08-08-10, 11:23 PM
Don't give up on that project. Jesda has managed to turn that old Saab into a really damn nice car. With your know how and attention to detail that car could be a real winner.

Night Wolf
08-09-10, 03:02 AM
I had Sunday off and devoted it to working on the car - another 12 hours logged in. I was unsure what I was going to get done, For the most part, I am on hold with the current mechanical projects until my parts arrive Thursday plus the thought of not getting greasy was appealing.

The bumper mounted fog lights that look like they belong on the Jeep, not BMW - are factory, I like them and they work well, but draw a little too much attention to themselves in a not so good way.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal001.jpg

VHT Nite Shades took care of that (same thing I used on the BMW and Jeep front turn signal lenses)

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal005.jpg

I went a bit heavy with it and it is darker then I'd like, but they are still bright at night.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal006.jpg

I previously painted the grilles and headlight rings black, although new grilles are on the way, couldn't pass up on the price ($15 ea x 3)

The interior is dirty and there are alot of little odds and ends that I want to do within the car, so the best idea was to remove everything.

First the front seats. The car originally had leather seats, but all front and rear seats were already recovered in vinyl before I bought it - actually a darn good job I think. I much prefer the vinyl too as leather is picky about maintenace, not as durable and gets effected by the sun much greater (the seats are exposed alot)

A while back I bought a pair of Sport seats from a convertible in tan leather and have them in the house, they are in good condition and was unsure what to do with them. There are alot of unique parts on these things, so they'll be spares. I am going to clean up and lube the seats, replace a few broken parts fromt he other set, paint the frames and finally, install heat pads. My car had heated seats from the factory - the switches and wiring is there, but the seats do not have the heat pads. Either they were removed when getting recovered or a different set of seats were installed. Either way I am going to buy an aftermarket kit and wire them into the factory wiring. The switches are 3-way off/low/high and light up when on. It'll be really nice for top down driving during the cooler months.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal007.jpg

When I bought this car, I wanted a tan interior, not black. I was thinking about changing to black but decided to keep the tan, I prefer it, plus it'll stay that much cooler with the top down. Either way, the carpet was pretty nasty

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal009.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal012.jpg

Then the upper part of the rear seat came out

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal014.jpg

along with the consol

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal016.jpg

Moar nastiness

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal017.jpg

There are two ways to remove e30 carpet - remove the HVAC unit under the dash, or make several short cuts hidden by the consol. Out came the aviation tin snips.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal019.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal020.jpg

This thing was pretty nasty

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal021.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal022.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal023.jpg

I shook out the carpet on the ground, but there was still 20 years worth of junk within the car. I brought out my shop vac - which hasn't worked for a year. I went to turn it on one time and the power button fell inside, of course it was already off. With no easy way to open it up I decided to plug it in, get a screw driver and pry off the power swtich then randomly jab inside, after several times it turned on! It is now turned off by unplugging it, works for me!.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal029.jpg

Night Wolf
08-09-10, 03:32 AM
I've heard about people pressure washing carpet, but never actually tried it - so I fired up the Honda:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal025.jpg

yes, those are the front steps to my house that I removed to repair just before I started working on the car again.... I'm determined to get the car back on the road and the house has 2 entry doors!

I must say, I was impressed.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal026.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal027.jpg

Not sure where the green came from, oh well

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal028.jpg

Now to let it dry outside for about 3 days.

BMW used this tar stuff as sound proofing, well due to various water leaks over the years the stuff on the floor boards just crumbled I decided to just remove it all as I doubt it does much for sound (it's a convertible...) it gets more nasty as time goes on and think of the weight reduction! Really tho, there was probably 30lbs of this crap in the car.

When I bought this car, there was a plastic ice scraper in the trunk. I never had a use for it until now, paired with a flathead screwdriver...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal030.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal031.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal032.jpg

The sun was beating right down on it and it was about 100*F today, it was coming up in sections pretty nice actually. Note to GM: Learn something from BMW. The black elongated panel is fuel tank access to replace the fuel pump. The round one is fuel tank access to replace the level gauge. Changing the fuel pump from within the car and not dropping the gas tank - imagine that.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal033.jpg

stuff was pretty thick

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal034.jpg

All clean!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal035.jpg

My trunk had a leak and one of the areas was from the 3rd brake light on trunk lid as the tool kit was rusty. I could swap the trunk lid for one from a coupe but I don't mind the lower profile light, plus the trunk, along with all other body panels are original to the car and with all the Bubba's in their pickup trucks around here, a higher brake light is probably a good thing

So I decided to give it some TLC. The cover is held on by 6 screws

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal038.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal037.jpg

The old gasket shrunk over time, and BMW only sells the whole assembly, not just the gasket. I cleaned all the grime off the trunklid and waxed the area under/around the light with some ColorX - car could use a good waxing, it's been about a year and a half. Then I used a strip of rubber to make my own new gasket. The light worked, but the bulb was original, so I put a new one in.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal040.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal041.jpg

I loosely installed the screws which allowed me to position the gasket how I wanted, then tightened it down.

Because the car is rather high on the jackstands, it can be difficult to reach some areas, this comes in quite handy as a step stool.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal043.jpg

Night Wolf
08-09-10, 03:53 AM
I keep a few of these laying around. They are cheap and you never know when some thin aluminum will come in handy. I made a heat sheild on the Jeep (to fit between the cat and trans) out of two of these with exhaust wrap sandwhiched in between.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal044.jpg

Then I used a razor to trim the edges off around the curves.

Finished:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal045.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal046.jpg

I've heard that "The Right Stuff" is about the best sealant/gasket maker you can get. $16 for 4oz and it should be.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal047.jpg

So I put it around all 7 screws, and the two plastic alignment pins hidden by the foam to seal the trunk.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal048.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal049.jpg

Dollar General carries "Awesome", it is about the best cleaner/degreaser I've used. It has so many uses too, and a spray bottle of it is only $1. I keep a big container and 2 spray bottles on hand, one straight for heavy grease, the other about a 50/50 mix with water for lighter stuff (such as this)

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal051.jpg

Before (the rust under the tool was thick)

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal050.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal052.jpg

Then I cleaned the outside of it

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal053.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal054.jpg

Now to test!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal055.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal056.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal057.jpg

I poured it in all directions around the light

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal058.jpg

Night Wolf
08-09-10, 04:27 AM
As soon as I opened the trunk I saw water on the carpet... turns out it was coming from the tail light. Both of them are cracked, so I am going to get another pair along with new gaskets for them. This appears to be where the majory of the leak was from

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal059.jpg

But no leak here!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal060.jpg

Only time (and a long rainstorm) will really tell tho. I am going to order all new tools for the trunk kit.

I then decided to clean the rear side panels with awesome. I brought them inside tho and will go over them again either with a tooth brush or magic eraser as the shop towels were not getting in the "grain" very well

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal062.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal065.jpg

I swapped the entire top and frame with the 1992 318iC I had for a while. I couldn't get the old frame aligned properly (on this car, fit great on the '92) and this frame was acting up on the '92 but fits great on this car - go figure. I temp installed the top, but decided it was finally time to properly rig the top. I attempted this once before (on the other frame/top when on this car) with bad results. I studied the design a bit more and realize that it is quite a simple top design for what it is and was easy to adjust.

So I put the windows switches back in (only 1 in pic) as well as the window lock switch, which is needed to provide power to the switches

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal067.jpg

On each side there are 3 mounting points, the lower two are what control the adjustments, this is just extra support and once set, is shimed to fill in the gap. I have the top moved as far forward as it will go and this gave me a proper fit.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal066.jpg

Already did the drivers side, I spent HOURS on it, but learned alot. This is the passenger side. Those are the two mounting points and the 1mm shims are used to adjust overall top height as well as tilt forward/back. loosen the nuts and it'll slide forward/aft along with some minor side to side adjustment. It was rather time consuming as I would make a change (one shim at a time) then close the top, latch it down, check the fit, then lather on check the windows.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal068.jpg

The shocks that hold the lid are shot - on the list, and it would have really helped during this process, that little screwdriver did well tho.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal070.jpg

Tough to see, but this is the drivers side all bolted down

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal071.jpg

The door windows have adjustments for window tilt as well as how high it'll go. I pulled off the plastic and threw it away. I was able to get the window nice and straight, as well as seal better by raising up a bit more.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal073.jpg

So then I did the same to the other side

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal077.jpg

and found a surprise

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal079.jpg

I never bothered to check, but the passenger window is stamped PPG while the rest are BMW. The car was broken into at some time, the shop vac cleaned the glass up.

The passenger door window never lined up properly, and now I know why. Maybe a difference in glass, but it sticks too far out and there is no adjustment for that. Also, someone did a really crappy job with the slide that mounts to the glass for the regulator as it is crooked and not straight, so when it gets to the very top it pushes the window back, and messes up the alignment. Once I saw that I didn't even bother going further, I am going to try and find a used BMW passenger door window glass from a convertible.

The only adjustment for bringing the window in more, is to actually adjust the door in. The passenger door was a tad out from the body (at the quarter panel) so I loosened the latch and moved it in. The door lines up nice, but now is a bit more difficult to close, that movement did very little to help the window gap tho.

The top is very picky when being adjusted. I wanted it as far forward as possible so the part that goes against the windsheild lines up, but then the rear quarter panel windows were getting hung up, I was able to adjust that out to ok levels by adding a shim to tilt the top further. With the exception of the passenger door window, the other 3 work and fit very well, and seal very nice. This top needs to be repalced but funds don't (and wont for a while) allow, so it'll do for now. When the car does get a new top tho, all the seals will be replaced.

So I brought the front seats inside and put them in the living room. I put some towels onver them to deter the cats from posibly clawing them - they are good cats and only claw at their scratching post/cardboard but I was unsure because I'm sure they are full of all sorts of smells that cats can pick up on.

But, it didn't take long before they had other ideas. Heck, I find them to be rather comfortable myself

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal080.jpg

Then daughter wanted to join her mother...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/cats002.jpg

That was a couple hours ago, they are still passed out on them.

ejguillot
08-09-10, 07:47 PM
Very nice progress, Rick! Keep at it.

orconn
08-09-10, 08:23 PM
I envy your ability to take on this project and take it to a successful conclusion. While a 3 series Bimmer convertible would not be my choice (an Alfa Romeo spider or 1600 Giulia would be my choice) I do know that you will have a very enjoyable car when you are finished. When I bought my Jag XK150 drophead the mechanical and bodywork had been done but the interior needed work to bring it up to the standard of the rest of the car. I spent my spare time for two months and ended up with a beautiful refurbished seven year old car for my efforts. I can see that you are going to end up with a nicely restored survivor and a lot of satisfaction in a job well done!

gdwriter
08-09-10, 08:37 PM
That's an impressive amount of work, and you're going to have a very nice ride when you're all done.

OffThaHorseCEO
08-09-10, 08:49 PM
pictures and progress like this are the only reason i wouldnt mind picking up an allante with an interior that needs work...

theyre also the reason i WANT a garage!

Night Wolf
08-10-10, 12:55 AM
I envy your ability to take on this project and take it to a successful conclusion. While a 3 series Bimmer convertible would not be my choice (an Alfa Romeo spider or 1600 Giulia would be my choice) I do know that you will have a very enjoyable car when you are finished. When I bought my Jag XK150 drophead the mechanical and bodywork had been done but the interior needed work to bring it up to the standard of the rest of the car. I spent my spare time for two months and ended up with a beautiful refurbished seven year old car for my efforts. I can see that you are going to end up with a nicely restored survivor and a lot of satisfaction in a job well done!

Thanks! I've heard a lot of great things about Alfa, tho I have never driven one. I'm excited to hear they may be coming to the US once again.

My best abality on cars is mechanical work. Interior stuff until you get into actual upholserty is pretty straight forward. The main thing that I am not good at, mostly because I have never had the chance to properly do, is body work. That is the downside to this car, the body is full of little dings - both sides, hood and trunk. I bought it like that and it is what it is. It can be fixed in the future though. The first reason why I was so willing to devote to much time/energy/money into this car is because of it's overall structural condition. It spent its whole life in the South and as such there is no rust on the thing, anywhere. It is straight and accident free, so the small imperfections on the body I can live with.

I never used to like these cars, I didn't like anything the BMW had to offer. I looked at 3-series when I got my first DeVille, I passed on the e36 for being too yuppie looking, and passed on the e30 because from looking at some pics of cars on ebay, it appeared to look like an 80's Japaneese econobox and didn't have all the luxury stuff I wanted. It wasn't until I started to enjoy being more into the driving of a vehicle and manual transmission that my interest grew in the e30, once I realized how much I like the open air and wanted a convertible, it was set. DaveSmed from this site is actually the guy that first introduced me to e30s and what they offer.

The plan isn't to restore the car, but basically bring it up to "fairly new" specs. What I mean is just a car that is all up to par that I can (and will) drive anywhere without thinking twice about. As cars get older, this is more difficult due to parts wearing. The e30 dosen't have many rubber parts that wear, but the rubber stuff it does have are rather involved to replace. Instead of chasing one worn thing after another, I'm going through the entire car and replacing all wear items, as well as "while I'm in there" things. This is only one part of the entire project tho, the convertible top replacement is another and another is the engine will get some attention in the future in the form of timing belt/waterpump and all new hoses, various seals and vac lines. Also the clutch, I'm leaving it as is now, but if it ever goes out I'll probably get the trans rebuilt (atleast new synchros) at that time.

This car means alot to me for some reasons I know, and others I don't. It was the first car that got me back into the hobby of enjoying cars after my '93 Coupe Deville was stolen. I poured everything I had into the Coupe and for it to be stolen at that time in my life was hard on me. For a couple years vehicles were just transportation (Isuzu/Lincoln) that I enjoyed for the reliable service they gave and took great care of them, but there was as much emotional attachtment as that to my dishwasher. This car changed all of that in some ways I don't understand.

Money is also not a consideration with this car - that is how much I put into it and how much it is worth (book value) simply because there is no book valve for what this car is worth, to me.

What I mean by that is, When I first had the idea of a small, sporty convertible, I test drove a then-new Pontiac Solstice GXP. Sweet car that I did (and still do, though prefer the Sky) really like, but I couldn't justify the $30k pricetag, not to metion all the interest because I would finance it (This was before I bought the used Jeep). So I started to search for cars that offered a similar feeling, but used, old, and cheap. The BMW e30 and NA Mazda Miata were the two cars that met the criteria.

As far as I am concerned, take any new "sporty convertible" IE: Miata, Mini, 1-series, S2000, Sky/Solstice etc... cars that are around $30k new. My old e30 fills that role for me, to such a degree that I consider, and use the car the same way I would any of those - a daily driver and to see just how many miles/trips/smiles I can get. Because of this old car, I have next to no desire to own something similar, but new. The new cars may be faster, but the old BMW is plenty fast for me as it is, not to mention there are various mods that can be done. While the e30 convertible is unique, it dosen't exactly scream "steal me" either, which is a great benefit for a car I plan to use as a daily driver - then again I didn't think an old Coupe DeVille did either.

In other words, I paid $2500 for the car 2 years ago. During this current project I guesstimate another $2500 being put into it, not counting another set of tires so add $500. The new convertible top, highest quality and labor will be right at $1000 and when I get to poking deeper into the engine there will be about another $500.

All added up, that is $7000, and I'm sure the actual (and final) number is much higher. But it is divided up over a long time (the top replacement is not a priority and will be done as spare funds allow) But even using that figure, $7000 I would have, as far as I am concerned a mechanically and cosmetically new car that would otherwise cost me $30k. All with a style that is unique, uncommon and grabs my interest. It's not considered a sports car and is fairly cheap to insure, parts are cheap, the thing is a joy to work on. It's a win situation for me in every way.

Another way to look at it is, for what the sales tax alone would have been on that $30k Solstice, I was able to buy the old BMW in cash and drive it home. Then over the years, as funds allow, fix it up.

That is my plan with the car, and thats what I am working on. Because of that, the car is getting refreshed and cleaned, but not totally repalced. Examples would be the carpet, you can see the wear areas, but it is going back in. The dash is in very good condition, but does have a couple small cracks, but it is staying. The seats/door/rear side panels are not all perfect, but they are getting cleaned and going back in. The goal isn't to make the car look 100% and part of this is because of my intentions - to drive the heck out of it and use it every day. I tend to be OCD with my vehicles (not including the Jeep for some reason despite being the newest, lowest miles and by far the most expensive) An example of this would be the Lincoln, I would always be concerned about where I parked it and getting a door ding, it would be on my mind where ever I went, just there in the back of my head nagging at me. I didn't like driving it to work or getting it dirty.

Becuase the BMW already has body dings and isn't perfect, I tend to not stress about it. Dosen't mean I don't take care of it, but if I spent the money and effort to resotre the body and give it a like new paint job, I don't think I'd be able to use the car as a daily driver as I intend to, same goes for the interior.

That may change some time though. When I am older if the car is still around (as I don't ever plan on selling it) I may change my mind and go all out to restore the car inside and out. But that would probably be a time when I don't intend to use it as a daily driver. For now (and the next several years) I just want to see how many miles I can put on the thing. 140k now and if I can see 300k on the odo, then I'll be happy and all this work will be well worth it, the car was made to be driven and thats what I fully intend to do with it.

Night Wolf
08-10-10, 01:05 AM
Thanks everyone for the kind words! I'm already documenting the work and sharing it with the e30 community, so I figured I'd share it here as well, as I have spent so much time here and plan to hit various meets, so if anyone asks/inquires about the car in the future, they can check out the thread.


pictures and progress like this are the only reason i wouldnt mind picking up an allante with an interior that needs work...

theyre also the reason i WANT a garage!

One of the "requirements" when I was looking for a house was a garage, or atleast a carport.... and, well you see how that worked out :). I like my house a whole lot though and it offered everything I wanted, but the garage, which can be added.

I will say that is part of the reason for the 10-month hold. I was already feeling overwhelmed from the car, then kept saying to myself "if only I had a garage I would work on the car at night and in the rain". But then I looked at it the other way, and realized it's not all that bad. First up, I'm on a concrete driveway. I used to work on my cars on gravel (in the snow too!) So right there is nice. At night isn't a big deal as the house has exterior lights and I also have portable halogen work lamps that light the car up pretty well.

That was also when I was determined to fix up the shed, or atleast get it in useable condition (it'll be painted etc... in the future) because I told myself even though I don't have a big 2-car garage, I can just make due with what I have, and a small area were all my tools are in one spot and organized, as well as a work bench for smaller projects made all the difference in feeling overwhelmed to thinking "why the heck did I put this off for 10-months?"

So that's what it came down to for me, my work area is not ideal - but then again is it really ever? There always seems to be room for improvement or "what if I had" etc... so instead I think of what I *do* have and how much worse it could be, and now the working conditions don't bother me at all. I'm glad to have the concrete driveway, an enclosed shed/workshop and the ability to store/work on a car in such condition (no HOA etc....) as well as not be in a crowded cookie cutter sub divsion where I can't run my pressure washer at 6PM etc...

Playdrv4me
08-10-10, 01:12 AM
The plan isn't to restore the car, but basically bring it up to "fairly new" specs. What I mean is just a car that is all up to par that I can (and will) drive anywhere without thinking twice about.

I believe the industry calls that a "resto-mod". Granted you aren't really "modding" anything, but its the same basic restoration goal. Can't wait to see the end result.

Night Wolf
08-10-10, 01:38 AM
I believe the industry calls that a "resto-mod". Granted you aren't really "modding" anything, but its the same basic restoration goal. Can't wait to see the end result.

From what I have seen, that term is used to update an old car, as in not a total restore, but say putting an old Corvette on a new Corvette chassis, or restoring a 1st gen Camaro with all disc brakes, fuel injection, overdrive etc... it's not numbers matching, but its an updated show car.

I suppose what that could be, but I have no intention on making this car a "show" car, as it is going to be a daily driver. Rain storms, the drive to work, year-round etc... I've thought "resto-mod" cars were more like collector/show cars etc...

The car is getting various mods in some degrees but mostly for the sake of improving my day to day enjoyment of the car or upgrading to more durable parts - all replaced suspension bushings are poly, instead of rubber, brakes lines are going to be coated braided stainless steel etc.. it is going to be lowered on H&R Sport springs with Bilstein Sport shocks, other mechanical bits are getting upgraded. Cosmetics are pretty much limited to the sort of thing I've already been doing. I am also going to be upgrading the sound system as I am a music junkie.

Still unsure about wheels. For now I am sticking with the 14" Bottlecaps, I'll give them a little TLC too, probably go use a set of tires on them then decide if I want to change them.

The most excited part about this whole project, and what fuels me to keep going and get it done - is just to drive the car. Drive it to work, Drive it to the beaches in Florida, drive it up to NY and Maine to visit friends/family, drive it to Californa for that cross-country road trip I've always wanted to take etc... It's like opposite miles, sitting at 140k now, I really want to see how many miles I can put on the thing. Good thing the old M20 has an excellent track record - thats another minor reason (main is because I am content with it) engine mods are kept basic (I do plan to chip the computer some time, +15hp/tq but raises rev limiter from 6500 to 6900 for more fun, and sweet sounds- requires premium gas at that point), it's quite peppy as it is, sounds great, returns very resonable fuel mileage and is one of the most reliable engines BMW built - 140k on this thing is nothing.

Night Wolf
08-10-10, 03:16 AM
These 3 pics never made it into the original thread. I did this at the same time as the fog lights.

e30 convertibles have a lone interior lamp. At some point I would like to get a compass/temp rear view mirror with map lights.

To me, the white lens seemed to stick out just a bit too much

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal002.jpg

BAM!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal003.jpg

Surprised that even at night, it still gives off a good bit of light.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interiorremoveal004.jpg

Playdrv4me
08-10-10, 04:57 AM
From what I have seen, that term is used to update an old car, as in not a total restore, but say putting an old Corvette on a new Corvette chassis, or restoring a 1st gen Camaro with all disc brakes, fuel injection, overdrive etc... it's not numbers matching, but its an updated show car.

I suppose what that could be, but I have no intention on making this car a "show" car, as it is going to be a daily driver. Rain storms, the drive to work, year-round etc... I've thought "resto-mod" cars were more like collector/show cars etc...

The car is getting various mods in some degrees but mostly for the sake of improving my day to day enjoyment of the car or upgrading to more durable parts - all replaced suspension bushings are poly, instead of rubber, brakes lines are going to be coated braided stainless steel etc.. it is going to be lowered on H&R Sport springs with Bilstein Sport shocks, other mechanical bits are getting upgraded. Cosmetics are pretty much limited to the sort of thing I've already been doing. I am also going to be upgrading the sound system as I am a music junkie.

Still unsure about wheels. For now I am sticking with the 14" Bottlecaps, I'll give them a little TLC too, probably go use a set of tires on them then decide if I want to change them.

The most excited part about this whole project, and what fuels me to keep going and get it done - is just to drive the car. Drive it to work, Drive it to the beaches in Florida, drive it up to NY and Maine to visit friends/family, drive it to Californa for that cross-country road trip I've always wanted to take etc... It's like opposite miles, sitting at 140k now, I really want to see how many miles I can put on the thing. Good thing the old M20 has an excellent track record - thats another minor reason (main is because I am content with it) engine mods are kept basic (I do plan to chip the computer some time, +15hp/tq but raises rev limiter from 6500 to 6900 for more fun, and sweet sounds- requires premium gas at that point), it's quite peppy as it is, sounds great, returns very resonable fuel mileage and is one of the most reliable engines BMW built - 140k on this thing is nothing.

I think you are right about the show car thing, but to me its always been about restoring something that could be a 100 point this or that, simply to a point where it looks good, and can be driven day in and day out without worrying about nicks or scratches, or that you'll bring down the collectability of the car. This is a classic as far as I'm concerned, and you are giving it new life. Call it a restoration, refurbishment, or whatever... but it will be putting an increasingly rarer and rarer car on the road, and that's a good thing.

gdwriter
08-10-10, 02:14 PM
Betty would probably be considered a resto-mod at this point. She looks original, and that's what counts with me. Over at ChevyTalk, the Chevy version of CF, there were members who thought I should rebuild the Powerglide instead of putting in the 700R4, especially since it was the original drive train (since I have the build sheet, I could match up the serial number on the engine).

But I'm glad I made the update. To drive, it doesn't feel much different. The 1-2 shift happens at about the same point as with the Powerglide, and the 2-3 and especially the 3-4 shifts are hardly detectable. I haven't gotten a good sense of the gas mileage improvement because the odometer is still off slightly, but running 800 to 1,000 RPMs lower at highway speed is so much quieter.

Likewise, the modern stereo is hidden behind what was originally a dealer installed tissue dispenser. So I can keep the original AM radio in the dash (and turn it on at night so the dial lights up) and have an output for my iPod. The rear stabilizer bar made a huge difference in handling, eliminating much of the body lean without hurting the ride, as did wider tires. At 215/75R14, they're just 10 mm narrower than the tires on the Seville.

The important thing is to get the car to a place where you're going to enjoy it the most. Which it sounds like you're doing.

Interesting that BMW put all those warning lights up in the header panel; I didn't know they did that. Some Toyotas had that back in the 70s.

hueterm
08-12-10, 09:47 PM
OMG -- if I went outside and saw my vehicle in that state of disassembly, I'd go back inside and cry.

Kudos that you can do all that, Rick!

gdwriter
08-13-10, 02:22 AM
OMG -- if I went outside and saw my vehicle in that state of disassembly, I'd go back inside and cry.Well, I was in a similar boat 10 years ago, so I can commiserate:

http://gdwriter.com/graphics/engine_out_4_big.jpg

http://gdwriter.com/graphics/empty_engine_bag_big.jpg

I was just fortunate that I had made friends with someone at a car show who was very capable mechanically and recently retired, so helping me pull Betty's engine for a rebuild and putting her back together was a fun project for him.

http://gdwriter.com/graphics/painted_engine_3_big.jpg

Although George did 90% of the work, I cleaned parts, held things in place and handed him wrenches, so I still feel like I had some ownership of the restoration process. The fact that the engine still runs beautifully 10 years and 60,000 miles later makes me feel good about the time spent.

Night Wolf
08-14-10, 12:49 AM
Gary - I admire you for actually driving and using your classic Impala as it was intended to be used, I respect that.


Interesting that BMW put all those warning lights up in the header panel; I didn't know they did that. Some Toyotas had that back in the 70s.

That is the active check control. For sake of an essay, I made a dorky video of how it works.

zdOWfDIe9ZU

gary88
08-14-10, 01:10 AM
Interesting. On my car when a warning light comes on it'll show the icon in the center LCD display, and display text describing in the iDrive screen. After about 5 seconds it disappears, and leaves a small triangle with an exclamation inside it on the center LCD to remind you there's a fault. After this, at any time you can check what warning it is by scrolling to the "check control" option in the center LCD menu and it'll display everything again for about 5 seconds. It even showed me a warning light once telling me the battery in my keyfob was low. Neat to see how that evolved over time.

Night Wolf
08-14-10, 01:28 AM
Here are some updates from the past week. Last night 2 packages consisting of $185 worth of parts arrived, and I have both Saturday and Sunday off, so I've got big plans for the car this weekend.

I let this thing dry outside for nearly 3 days

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2001.jpg

I was going to install the carpet as-is, but got to thinking how easy it would be to try painting it when it is out of the car...

Before:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2003.jpg

After:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2007.jpg

Carpet is clean and dry

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2005.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2006.jpg

And painted...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2008.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2009.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2010.jpg

Since it is paint and not dye, it was kinda crusty, but I took my shoes off and walked barefoot on it for about 10mins which really lossened it up, feels about how it did before.

Installed:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2011.jpg

Some pictures at night that show the color alot better:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2045.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2046.jpg

So I decided to keep touching up little odds and ends on the car

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2015.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2016.jpg

While that was being painted and drying...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2017.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2018.jpg

Night Wolf
08-14-10, 01:52 AM
Then while that was being paited and drying

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2020.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2021.jpg

I'm really happy with the Duplicolor trim paint. If sprayed properly, it comes out pretty good. My car had (what was once) "chrome" around the windsheild moulding. Later e30's got all black trim there, so I'll be replacing the windsheild trim with the later black version to improve the look.

The back bumper rub strip came out decent

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2024.jpg

Then I decided to clean out the trunk, removed the carpet panels and since some had stains/mildew from the leaks, I pressured washed them all.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2028.jpg

before shop vac cleaning

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2029.jpg

The factory amp for the 6-speaker premium sound system. I already disconnected and bypassed it when I installed the new headunit and rewired the speakers. Now I removed the amp and the wiring, and the car will be getting rewired again but for a 4ch amp and sub.

There is a wall for the trunk and one behind the rear seat, leaving a ecent sized area between the two that can not be accessed. I was thinking it would be a neat place to mount amps, but there is no way to get in there without cutting a hole.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2032.jpg

I also decided to remove the front lower spoiler. Factory engine oil cooler right thurr.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2036.jpg

Now we arrive at some interesting German engineering....

non-convertible e30's have the battery mounted in the trunk. Better weight distrubution, plus it is better conditions for the battery to live in.

The convertible chassis was beefed up in various areas due to the missing roof. Because of this it weighs 152lbs more then a coupe/sedan. However, the battery is located in the front - in the engine bay.

What takes it's place is literally a 50lbs lead weight. BMW parts breakdown calls it a "vibration dampener" and once I saw it suspended on 4 rubber feet bolted down, it was easy to see.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2033.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2034.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2035.jpg

Apparently it is supposed to reduce shimmy within the chassis. I can understand how a suspended heavy mass will do that, but I question its actual benefit. 50lbs of dead weight is alot. I mean, this sucker is heavy. I could get a battery harness from a coupe/sedan and relocate my battery to the trunk. Not only would I be loosing 50lbs, but I would be relocating another 40-50 from the front, to the back, which would be really good.

I'm so close to leaving this thing out, but the only thing stopping me is knowing that BMW wouldn't do something like this - relocate the battery and add a 50lbs dead weight to a car made for handling, for no reason. Oh, and if you go to BMW and want a new chunk of lead, the cost? $600. Surely BMW must know something I don't - reasons to keep a $600 50lbs boat anchor bolted into the back of this car. That's the only thing keeping me from leaving it out.

Then I removed the trunk seal and cleaned the drains as well as the trunk lid, which was pretty nasty before

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2039.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2040.jpg

All done for now, the trunk carpet will be going back in

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2041.jpg

The airdam came out nice, but the front bumper rub strips didn't seem to take the paint very well. Ah well, it's better then it was and I'm not going for perfection, it can always be changed in the future.

Noelle says goodnight till next time...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-8-10%20interior%20removeal/interior2043.jpg

Kev
08-14-10, 02:17 AM
Looking good Rick, keep it up!

gdwriter
08-14-10, 02:24 AM
Gary - I admire you for actually driving and using your classic Impala as it was intended to be used, I respect that.Thank you. And I'm impressed with the work you're doing on Noelle.

Since I got a replacement for the broken air conditioning lever the other day and had reinstalled the dash assembly, I drove Betty to work today. Because of this and an electrical issue (which turned out to be my fault for putting in wires backwards when replacing the alternator), I haven't driven her that much since getting her back from her tranny transplant two months ago. So it was nice to drive her today and be reminded once again how much I enjoy this car.

Although you certainly like Noelle considering the time, money and effort you're putting in, it will be even better once you get her back on the road. I know that's how I felt after the engine rebuild 10 years ago. And in my case, Betty was only laid up for about a month.

V-Eight
08-14-10, 06:57 PM
Nice work, the paint for the carpet made a huge difference.

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 01:08 AM
Sunday, Augest 15th Two seperate shipments of parts arrived that previous Thursday.

Package #1 - $110

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal004.jpg

Center Support Bearing for the driveshaft, Guibo (connects transmission output flange to driveshaft), reverse switch, two transmission mounts, Diff cover gasket, two diff output seals, speedometer impulse seal, extra plastic washers/o-rings for shifter linkage.

Package #2 - $75

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal008.jpg

New (aftermarket, slight differences) left, center and right grilles. transmission selector shaft seal, transmission output shaft seal and four CV axle boot kits.

New grilles installed:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal011.jpg

I then started to replace the transmission seals. The transmission was yet still oily from the past leaks, and I really don't like working on dirty stuff. I pulled out the pressure washer and washed the underside of the car - again.

While waiting for most of it to dry, I decided to change the spark plug wires. I bought a new set, along with other stuff about a year ago. On the #6 plug wire there is an impulse pickup that tell the computer which of the two sets of injectors to open. If this wire fails, or a cheap set without it is used, the computer defaults and fires all injectors at the same time.

The routing of the impulse pickup was such that alot of stuff needed to come off to remove it. Looking back, I could have simply cut the old impulse wire and rerouted the new one, but atleast now I have a spare complete factory set of wires that still work ($150/set)

These were removed first:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal013.jpg

To the left of the dipstick, under the round connector are two 3-wire connectors. The furthest one is the impulse sensor pickup.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal014.jpg

Looking deeper at it, it went behind various cooling system components. Up until this time I did not disconnect anything to do with the cooling system, nor drain the coolant. That was about the change.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal015.jpg

When I went to remove the low coolant level sensor, the cover broke so I took this picture for reference to where the wires go, then unplugged the individual wires.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal016.jpg

Then the radiator came out. Hmmm... appears as if the fan was making contact at some point, nothing appeared out of the norm though...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal018.jpg

Now there is some more room to work on things

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal019.jpg

After draining the radiator and removing various hoses, I decided to drain the engine block via the coolant drain plug. It was difficult to contain the drainage.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal020.jpg

Yet still I can not remove the impulse pickup wire.... the thermostat housing needs to be removed. At this point I decided to just pull the intake manifold as it would make it much easier to perform more work on the engine and replacing stuff. The two fuel lines are easy to mix up so I put a piece of tape on the one going to the fuel pressure regulator. The wire between the engine hoist bracket and the unplugged blue connector is the impulse pickup - the reason why the intake manifold is now coming off.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal021.jpg

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 01:43 AM
The intake manifold on the M20, while in the car is a fun task. When I thought I had everything unbolted, it didn't want to come off the engine. Turns out I missed a hidden nut. Before I realized that I tried beating on it with a rubber hammer (intake is aluminum) and finally brute force of pulling it off.

While yanking on it very hard, something happened that I did not allow myself to believe. I tired again, and it happened again. Finally I set up my digital camera on video mode to be a second set of eyes so that I could verify what I thought was actually happeneing:

9eJ4wopgusM

The entire engine and transmission was lifting up as I attempted to pull the intake manifold off (that was still bolted at one location). The driverside motor mount was completely spilt in half. Unlike the motor mount on my '93 Cadillac DeVille that when failed, had a secondary metal to metal bracket to hold the engine, this simple rubber mount did not.

Remembering that BOTH transmission mounts were split in half also (transmission crossmember was installed int he video, but just for support). That means that out of the 4 engine/transmission mount locations, 3 were totally split in half, which no secondary feature. That explains why the fan was hitting the radiator. I then inspected the driver side engine mount, the only mount left, the one that is being pulled apart, not compressed and it was showing significant signs of splitting as well. I did some very crazy/foolish things in this car that, among other things, only had an engine and transmission bolted to the chassis at 25% of the locations. If that last mount gave out when driving, bad stuff would have happened.

Once I removed the last nut holding the intake manifold on, it came off easily. This will be getting cleaned up and anything needing replaced will be. Injectors are going to be swapped out in place of higher flow as I'll be getting a chip to take advantage of it.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal023.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal024.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal025.jpg

Every coolant hose will be getting replaced along with all other common wear items.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal026.jpg

In the past, the throttle body heater plate cracked and was leaking coolant. For a quick fix I bypassed the TB heater and connected the two lines together. Now that it is all removed, I am going to be removing the throttle body heater completely, as well as capping off the two coolant line locations - less potential coolant leaks.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal032.jpg

I then went under the car to continue replacing the seals as it was dry. But I couldn't help notice now that the intake manifold is removed, that I can easily see all the bolts holding the transmission to the engine.

See up to this point, there were two other main mechanical projects I was going to put on hold. The clutch of unknown age, but perfectly working condition was going to be left alone, along with the engine timing belt (was told it was "changed around 100k) water pump, and various upper and lower engine seals. Not that anything was leaking, but just preventative maintenace on a 20-year old car that will get the heck driven out of it once completed.

The plan was that "sometime next year" I would tear into the engine, and wait for the clutch to fail then I would replace it.... but I just couldn't help but see the car on jackstands for a long time, everything needed to be removed except for some bolts, and the thought of "while I'm in there...."

Screw it..... well, more like unscrew it.... "it" being the bolts that hold the transmission tot he engine.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal039.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal040.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal041.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal042.jpg

It was the first time I removed a transmission/clutch by myself, so it was pretty cool. It also answered a few questions I previously had about the operation of a clutch system

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal043.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal044.jpg

I saw an 89 date code, so it is the original clutch with 140k miles on it. Actually rather impressed as there was still life on it. I feel better now knowing that it'll be replaced when it goes back in.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal046.jpg

Flywheel will be getting resurfaced, maybe see about getting it lightened too

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal048.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal049.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal051.jpg

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 02:21 AM
Now that the transmission was out, I could properly clean it - with the pressure washer.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal054.jpg

Now that it is removed, it is getting a new clutch kit, clutch release fork, pivot pin, and new input shaft seal. Trans should be good to go for a long time now.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal055.jpg

Pressure washer made the rear of the engine clean in no time too

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal056.jpg

So then I pulled out both CV axles and got the boot kits together. It was my first time ever messing with CV axles, repacking them or replacing the boots, but it was straight forward.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal058.jpg

Tap the cap off, clean the grease out, remove the snap ring and the inner joint just slides right off

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal059.jpg

There is lots of grease in these things. The idea is to remove and clean as much of the old grease out as possible - without using chemicals. I used an entire roll of the shop towels between the two, but it's good to get as much of the old stuff out as you can.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal060.jpg

Once the inner joint is removed, the outter boot can now be slid off the shaft and new one slid on, grease the joint up, put the excess grease in the boot, slide the boot on all the way then clamp it down.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal061.jpg

Freshened up and original

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal063.jpg

The new boots are made out of a longer lasting rubber. I shouldn't have to bother with these things for a long, long time now.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal064.jpg

Then I moved on to the transmission. Replaced the selector shaft seal and output shaft seal, then installed the flange on the output shaft. BMW says to put loctite on the splines of the flange, which I did. All I had was red though and it was around midnight.... hopefully that flange dosen't have to come off for any reason again.... good thing is that it shouldn't leak. I put the new tranny mounts on too.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal072.jpg

I removed the vent cap and cleaned the whole area out good to prevent the vent from possibly clogging up, which would cause the seals to leak.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal073.jpg

and put the new reverse switch in

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal074.jpg

Then stored the trans away until it is further needed... starting to run out of storage room (outside of the house...)!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal076.jpg

I then pulled the diff back out and replaced the speedo sensor seal, the diff cover gasket and tightened the diff cover up tight, then removed and started to replace the output seals. While trying to get the first one to seat, I poked a hole right through the metal of the seal with a screw driver, then it started to rain. I put everything away and ordered a new seal. Both seals will get installed when the new one arrives.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal077.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/transmissionandintakemanifoldremoveal078.jpg

Playdrv4me
08-26-10, 02:31 AM
Mooaar!!

gdwriter
08-26-10, 02:39 AM
Unlike the motor mount on my '93 Cadillac DeVille that when failed, had a secondary metal to metal bracket to hold the engine, this simple rubber mount did not.Good heavens! Does that mean that crappy old GM actually engineered something better and more durable than the vaunted Germans? Hell must have frozen over!

*Note, this is not meant as snark toward you or your car, Rick. It's aimed any anybody who believes anything GM does is crap.

Playdrv4me
08-26-10, 02:51 AM
For some reason I found myself narrating this in my head with Joe Elmore's voice (old guy from Horsepower TV).

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 03:02 AM
That was all done on Sunday the 15th.

Fast forward a week to Sunday the 22nd

I really need to watch myself with "while I'm in there..." as I already removed the transmission...

then I got to thinking - what is really left that would prevent the engine from coming out? No transmission, no cooling system, one broken motor mount... it was simple. All that was left was two hoses on the power steering pump, a grounding strap on the oil pan, (1) engine mount and the wiring - which is easy, BMW designed the harness to stay with the engine. Remove the main connector from the computer about the glove box and feed it through the fire wall.

So I'm looking at my engine, which is (this) >< close to coming out. I was thinking how sweet it would be to clean and detail the entire engine bay, as well as the entire engine. Going further, it would be so easy to work on and build the engine up outside the car, install the transmission outside the car and install the entire unit as an assembly.

Oh and...... yup..... "while I'm in there...." the steering rack is oh so easy to get at. The stock e30 steering rack is 4.0 turns lock to lock, and it just so happens to be that an e36 steering rack will fit with minor modifications and is 3.2 turns lock to lock... I know, I really can't leave well enough alone...

I went to turn on my camera (which is getting pretty beat up as time goes on) and the lens cover got stuck halfway. Naturally, I took a picture and it came out pretty cool. The cats, all 3 of them, are glued to these seats. Once I get all the useable parts from my spare set, I may make some sort of a base for them and leave them in the living room.... for the cats... and me, and guests (they are comfortable)

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval001.jpg

I have had a load of gravel in my trailer for over a month now. I was putting it around the house (along with reparing the front steps and staining the porch etc...) before the house was put on hold for the car. Needing to use the trailer ment I had to unload the gravel.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval003.jpg

I unloaded the gravel late Saturday night, and while backing across my front yard to the spot I was going to unload the gravel, the trailer caught a small short tree stump. No more trailer lights - hand signaling is fun!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval004.jpg

My buddy Ted got in contact with his father who happens to have an engine lift that wasn't being used...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval006.jpg

BAM!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval008.jpg

Then this was in the way:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval010.jpg

Much better.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval009.jpg

This is Ted. Naturally with an orange mohawk he does drugs (not). In the picture of jumping my Jeep the first time I took it wheelin, Ted was riding shotgun. That made Ted want to buy his own Jeep, which he did. Ted also has a modified NA Miata which is cool.

It should also be noted that WAYYYYY back over a year and a half ago, Ted was the dude that convinced me to spend a weekend to "replace the shocks" on my BMW as all 4 were blown. Yeah.... "just" replace the shocks.... sounds easy enough (what started this whole project) - Thanks Ted!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval011.jpg

With the transmission removed, the engine wanted to tilt forward. Here is my kustom German-engineered engine stabilzation device that Ted laugh at

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval021.jpg

Here I am doing something other then taking pictures.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval018.jpg

Half of the motor mount

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval022.jpg

Of course we need the "engine above car" pic...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval023.jpg

and, here she is in 21-year old, 140k mile glory. Yes, the thought of modifiing this engine, or doing an engine swap crossed my mind. What it came down to was that BMW got the "i" engine pretty darn right the first time. An engine swap will add cost/complexity and I was happy with the performance of this thing before all the updates.

With that said, and my goal of the car - a fun, reliable daily driver to put loads of miles on, the M20 stays. With 140k, it is just about broken in. I am drawing the line at the head - that is, the head is not coming off the block. Everything else is getting cleaned up, painted and repalced if it needs to be.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval024.jpg

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 03:56 AM
Then there was the host of dorky me pictures...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval027.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval028.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval029.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval032.jpg

"Ah tink therrs sumthin wrong with ma starter..."

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval033.jpg

So among, well pretty much everything that has been put on hold because of the car, another thing would be the Jeep. The brakes have been getting progressively worse and worse, and towing the trailer really made it apparent that I need to do something about them.

Stock TJ brakes suck. The front calipers and rotors are too small even stock. Add larger tires and performance drops way down. Rear brakes on a TJ don't do much and there was an option of rear discs (added bling, easier and cheaper to replace, but NO added stopping performance) My Jeep has rear drums. My rear brakes have not been working properly for some time, as the parking brake did nothing at all. I would adjust them, they would work for a day and then go back to not working. All said and done, my Jeep's brakes moved to a level of being unsafe.

I could tell someone already replaced the front pads, which still have alot of life on them. When it is time to replace them I will get Centric rotors and EBC yellowstuff pads, which is the only upgrade worth doing on stock brakes. Other then that is a $1,000 big brake kit that completely replaces the front brakes to a proper setup. That is on hold until things like the Jeep itself' are paid off.

The brake fluid also looked rather yucky, I bought it when it was 3.5yrs old with 40k miles. It has a build date of 6/05 and now has 83k miles, so the brake fluid was time to be changed. I also wanted to do something about the rear brakes/parking brake.

So $130 later and I was on my way to better stopping. I brought the old drums to get machined in which the parts guy looked at me and asked several times how old and many miles are on them, apparently they are way out of limits and not able to be resurfaced. Two new drums, new shoes and a new spring kit was among the parts bought.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval034.jpg

Yes, drum brakes "work", and they have their place in a select few applications.... but on a passenger vehicle, they really need to be moth balled. Why a 2005 model year vehicle has drum brakes standard is beyond me. My 1994 Isuzu Amigo had 4-wheel disc standard. Way to go Chrysler.

When I removed the drum I noticed something - apparently the rear brakes were changed once before.... and someone put them on backwards. The larger shoe is supposed to be facing forward.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval036.jpg

I've never seen shoes with a groove down the center before.... no idea why it was there

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval038.jpg

But it did manage to totally screw up the drums. Normally I would just put new shoes in them and be done, but that was no possible the way the drums are worn. The spring kit (for both rear wheels) was $7 and the shoe set (for both wheels) was $15. This was going to be a cheap job, but then I had to spend an extra $90 on cast iron paper weights to do the job properly.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval037.jpg

At this point I was really questioning why I don't just bother with a rear disc conversion. I came up with the conclusion that it would be about $300, which is better spent on the BMW right now, and, as much as drum brakes suck, they atleast to their job on the Jeep. It's all replaced now, I'll get my money out of them, then convert to rear discs sometime in the future.

mmmmmm newly installed crappy technology

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval041.jpg

$47/each.... bake in heat sucker! Wait.... thats what drums already do.....

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval042.jpg

Once that was all done, I siphoned as much old fluid out of the master cylinder resivor as I could using this

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval049.jpg

The old stuff was nasty

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval050.jpg

It was pretty obvious there was water mixed in with the fluid.

I then did an entire flush and bleed of the brake system. This cheap "one-man brake bleeder" made the job easy. Start at the wheel furthest from the master cylinder and work closer. I kept flushing until the old fluid was out and new fluid started to flow.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval053.jpg

With all that being done - the TJ's brakes still suck. But atleast now they safely suck. They still will not lock up the grippy 33's, but atleast it feels like it'll actually stop. The rear brakes noticeably work. The pedal feels firmer and the brakes overall feel more even. Having a parking brake that actually works is nice too. It'll hold the Jeep in place when parked and slow it down pretty good when moving. Overall, I'm happy. It was much needed regular maintenace and also makes the Jeep much safer to drive.

Then it was time to go back to the BMW. I was having a hard time getting one of the A/C lines off the compressor, so I disconnected the line further up on the car. There was nothing at all in the lines. I'll probably replace whatever seals I can get to and see if it'll hold a charge when the car is back together.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval048.jpg

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 04:26 AM
So first up was removing that line, and the spark plug wires..... the original reason why the intake manifold came off, which gave me the idea to remove the transmission, and finally the engine...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval054.jpg

The edges of the fan blades are chewed up from contacting the radiator, they are cheap enough though and a new fan and fan clutch will be added to future parts orders.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval055.jpg

Then the distrubutor cap and rotor came off, they are brand new as I replaced them last year (when the car was on jackstands)

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval056.jpg

The wiring harness was getting in the way, so it was to be removed. BMW seems to be on a roll with pointless wire routing though as there was this single wire to a sensor routed not just behind the A/C compressor, but behind the bracket that holds the compressor to the engine.

I also wanted to pull all the accessories from the engine and start stripping it down. Pretty much everything was getting removed for cleaning/painting/replacing except the head from the block, thats where I was stopping.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval057.jpg

Then that bracket came off

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval058.jpg

FREEDOM!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval063.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval064.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval065.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval066.jpg

Then these came off

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval068.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval067.jpg

and their brackets

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval069.jpg

Night Wolf
08-26-10, 04:57 AM
I had an engine stand, then gave it away as I no longer used it. I was going to buy another one, but then realized I just stripped the whole engine pretty easily, and I can do all the work I want to do on the engine with it on the hoist so I am no longer going to buy an engine stand.

But, I wanted to remove the timing belt covers and the upper screws are also used to holt the engine hoist bracket

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval070.jpg

So I had to do sum redneck engineerrrin

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval072.jpg

I then put the bracket back on so I would be able to use the hoist point again.

Timing belt was changed once before, the new belt has a BMW logo on it, so it was either changed at the dealer or someone used OEM parts, thats good.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval073.jpg

Then these came off. All but two studs pulled out instead of the nuts, I was planning on replacing the studs anyway. Unlike the M42 in the '91 318iC I had, the M20 does not have cool factory headers. I was thinking about getting some nice headers, moreso for looks. All my research led to the conclusion that the cheap headers are not worth it and enable to get any benefits I would need to spend $1,000 on a proper set of headers, then modify parts of the exhaust system to work with it. Even then, on an otherwise stock engine the stock exhaust manifolds flow well, so they are staying as they do their job well and reliably. They will be getting cleaned up and painted along with new exhaust gaskets/heat sheilds.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval081.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval080.jpg

I will add that this mini maglite that has been converted from bulb to LED makes working at night much more possible.

I also gave up the BlackBerry and t-mobile. I miss the BlackBerry - a lot. But I was paying $90 for unlimited minutes/txt/(real) internet. I've been looking for ways to cut overall monthly expenses and the phone bill was a major one. I now have Straight Talk through Walmart (ehhh) which is only $45/month for unlimited minutes/txt/(basic)internet/unlimited calls to 411. It took a few months to finally make the switch, as I didn't want to give up the BlackBerry but cutting my phone bill in half - and saving $45/month made me do the switch.

I will say I am happy with Straight Talk. It is Verizon network (which sometimes drops calls in my house, something T-mobile didn't do) and no contract/no frills. $45/month period and unlimited use on the phone. The phone is rather basic, and coming from a smart phone it took alot of getting used to a "dumb" phone once again. The biggest let down is the internet. Nowhere near as capable and nice as internet on the BlackBerry. It's half the price though, so gotta give some things up.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval086.jpg

So here is the engine when I was done. The valve cover and oil pan will be coming off, but other then that, the engine is not getting taken apart much more. I'm excited to get it all cleaned up and painted nice.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval087.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval088.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval089.jpg

As more and more parts come off, they are being stored. My small ugly shed-turned-workshop is starting to run out of room to store stuff....

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval090.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval091.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval092.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-22-10%20engine%20trans%20removeal/engineremoval093.jpg

The engine will be staying outside as there is nowhere else to put it. I used a spare tarp (well it was covering the Snapper and Cub Cadet) to cover the engine and borrowed hoist as we have been getting rain.

I ordered more parts, delrin shift carrier bushings to replace the new rubber bushing I put in. Also a set of 6 stainless steel braided brake lines, which are on backorder.

Then later today another package arrives of about $175 worth of parts. Basically with these parts (and the backordered brake lines) I will be able to get the entire rear subframe back together, and back on the car - which is big because that is the first major sign of the car actually getting put together instead of taken apart. Also that rear subframe was a rather big step that first put me on hold for a few months, so it'll be a nice little victory to get it in and done.

gdwriter
08-26-10, 06:08 PM
Rick, I would recommend getting your exhaust manifolds sandblasted. It's cheap and did an excellent job when I did Betty's rebuild 10 years ago. I bought high-temperature paint designed specifically for exhaust manifolds, and while I thought they were too shiny at first, the paint eventually gets baked in, and the exhaust manifolds still look decent (this picture was taken last spring) and certainly better than most classic cars I see:

http://www.gdwriter.com/IMG_1236.jpg

Of course, powder coating is even better. My friend who helped me with the rebuild powder coated much of the engine bay in his '64 Impala SS, and you could eat off it it's so pristine.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-26-10, 08:01 PM
Wow, I really admire the amount of work you do to that little 3 Series. Some people do their restorations, but you really DO yours.

I was out with some friends last night, and one of them brought his 1984 633Ci. It's not in as nearly as good of a condition as yours are, but it's still neat to see. What really blew me away was how short (height) it is....it looks much bigger in pictures! But it's not as squared off as the 3 Series are, it's roof slopes a little more and the c-pillar is a little different where it meets the shoulder line. There's really a lot of glass on that car, and the pillars are all very thin. His is really beat up, and he's glad he bought it that way so he can modify it how he wants to and not ruin the car, but he says even after 26 years, it'll still do 140. :)

I didn't know this, but all the 6 Series, aside from the M6, were a SOHC 12v setup! Seems a little behind the times for a BMW...

Playdrv4me
08-26-10, 08:37 PM
Wow, I really admire the amount of work you do to that little 3 Series. Some people do their restorations, but you really DO yours.

I was out with some friends last night, and one of them brought his 1984 633Ci. It's not in as nearly as good of a condition as yours are, but it's still neat to see. What really blew me away was how short (height) it is....it looks much bigger in pictures! But it's not as squared off as the 3 Series are, it's roof slopes a little more and the c-pillar is a little different where it meets the shoulder line. There's really a lot of glass on that car, and the pillars are all very thin. His is really beat up, and he's glad he bought it that way so he can modify it how he wants to and not ruin the car, but he says even after 26 years, it'll still do 140. :)

I didn't know this, but all the 6 Series, aside from the M6, were a SOHC 12v setup! Seems a little behind the times for a BMW...

Love it or hate it the 635CSi is among the most timeless BMW designs ever created...

http://img2.netcarshow.com/BMW-635CSi_1978_1024x768_wallpaper_05.jpg

RippyPartsDept
08-26-10, 09:20 PM
:hmm:

orconn
08-26-10, 09:23 PM
^^^ I agree with Ian, the 635 Csi was one of BMW's really classic designs .... and the only BMW that I truly regret not having owned. I certainly looked at enough of them over the years with an eye to buy. They weren't that common even in L.A., but with a couple of years of "un-garaged" life in L.A. their interiors showed alot of sun damage. The size, shape and interior design were truly outstanding, and the driving dynamics were excellent for a car of that day.

Like so many very good European cars of that period they were bought by second owners who really couldn't afford or had the knowledge to keep them up properly. As a consequence, like so many Jags, they were totally trashed by their third owners. It's a shame, I would love to own a really nice example today. I am sorry to hear Chad's friend wants to modify the one he owns, but unless he has tons of disposable income I am afraid his car will meet the fate of so many exceptional cars of the era.

Stingroo
08-26-10, 09:25 PM
It looks strangely like a C6 Convertible.

Go figure.

Playdrv4me
08-26-10, 09:33 PM
:hmm:

:hmm:

hueterm
08-26-10, 10:10 PM
I've loved those 6s ever since Cybill Shepherd drove one in "Moonlighting"...

drewsdeville
08-26-10, 10:11 PM
I have to ask, it's bothering me...

You have the engine out, pretty much stripped of accessories; you've come so far...Why not pull the head, clean up the valves/, new valve guide seals and a new headgasket? Everything might be in good shape, but then again everything would then be refreshed at once and might give that nice warm fuzzy feeling that you know everything is right and nice. It's got 140k on it and it will never be easier. Don't want to leave the engine half refreshed. As old as it is now age-wise, the valve seals are probably getting brittle and could start cracking and leaking any time now. It'd be a shame if you had this engine out, refreshed half of it, and then started using some oil in a year or two...

Stingroo
08-26-10, 10:39 PM
^ He raises a fair point. :lol: Poor Rick, he gets deeper and deeper into this car.

drewsdeville
08-26-10, 10:55 PM
OK, or if he is really determined to NOT pull the head... I changed the valve seals on my 4.9 Cadillac by making an adapter for my air compressor that threads into the spark plug holes. By shooting compressed air in the cylinder you can remove the retainer keepers and replace the valve guide seal without the valve falling into the cylinder, therefore eliminating the need to pull the head.

The only reason I did this because I learned my lesson about head bolt threads in aluminum blocks on another 4.9 and didn't want to go through the unusual hassle of pulling the engine to helicoil the headbolt holes.

But then when using this method, you don't get to install a new headgasket either.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-27-10, 12:20 AM
I am sorry to hear Chad's friend wants to modify the one he owns, but unless he has tons of disposable income I am afraid his car will meet the fate of so many exceptional cars of the era.

Oh no, don't worry about this one. He bought it for $400 as a beater a few years ago. This is his daily driver so his 1971 Mercedes Benz 280SEL can stay in a garage 24/7/365. It's rusty, the paint's faded, the interior is shot, and it's got 247k miles on it. So it's not like it's really all that worth putting great NOS parts into it. He's an electrical engineering graduate, and this guy's a friggin' genius when it comes to automotive electronics and customization, but not in terms of loud stereos and stuff like that, but rather clever engineering schematics for running all sorts of interesting accessories and stuff never dreamed of by BMW in 1984. He does however want to put the 4.0L V8 from a 93-94 740i into it, and he recently rebuilt the transmission using parts from '80s era 3 & 5 series transmissions.

Night Wolf
08-27-10, 02:33 AM
Rick, I would recommend getting your exhaust manifolds sandblasted. It's cheap and did an excellent job when I did Betty's rebuild 10 years ago. I bought high-temperature paint designed specifically for exhaust manifolds, and while I thought they were too shiny at first, the paint eventually gets baked in, and the exhaust manifolds still look decent (this picture was taken last spring) and certainly better than most classic cars I see:

http://www.gdwriter.com/IMG_1236.jpg

Of course, powder coating is even better. My friend who helped me with the rebuild powder coated much of the engine bay in his '64 Impala SS, and you could eat off it it's so pristine.

I have a large compressor and sand blaster. There is a place just a few minutes from my house, it's a large commercial buidling with a vinyl sign that says "powder coating open to the public" I may have to stop by there and see what they can do.

I was just going to hit them with a wire wheel on the drill and then use high-temp engine paint.

I painted the valve cover once before, which is why it's the only thing that looks worth a darn right now. The first, last and only time I ever went into a Harley dealer was to buy that can of "HD Texture Black" spray paint, overpriced at $20/can. I must say though - it came out DARN nice, and I am very srprised how well it held up. I then sanded the raised areas down and clear coated them to prevent the polished metal from turning colors.

The valve cover is going to be getting touched up as there are some areas I am not happy with (my fault). The intake manifold is aluminum. It could be polished to a mirror shine, which I have seen, but I don't like. I was thinking about painting it black and sanding the raised areas like the valve cover, but I don't know if I'd like that either. Right now I decided on cleaning it up real good and seeing how it looks and either leaving it bare, or painting it silver (like the diff cover) and then the raised bars and BMW logo would be painted black.... which would be reversed of the valve cover. I think the contrast would be nice.

I don't want to do anything crazy as far as looks go. I want to work with what the car "could have been" if it was stock. I want a simple and clean engine bay that looks nice. I like to modify my vehicles in ways that may be hard to tell if it is stock or not, along with things that flow with how the vehicle was originally made.

gdwriter
08-27-10, 03:17 AM
I've loved those 6s ever since Cybill Shepherd drove one in "Moonlighting"...:yeah:

Night Wolf
08-27-10, 03:19 AM
Wow, I really admire the amount of work you do to that little 3 Series. Some people do their restorations, but you really DO yours.

I was out with some friends last night, and one of them brought his 1984 633Ci. It's not in as nearly as good of a condition as yours are, but it's still neat to see. What really blew me away was how short (height) it is....it looks much bigger in pictures! But it's not as squared off as the 3 Series are, it's roof slopes a little more and the c-pillar is a little different where it meets the shoulder line. There's really a lot of glass on that car, and the pillars are all very thin. His is really beat up, and he's glad he bought it that way so he can modify it how he wants to and not ruin the car, but he says even after 26 years, it'll still do 140. :)

I didn't know this, but all the 6 Series, aside from the M6, were a SOHC 12v setup! Seems a little behind the times for a BMW...

Thanks!

The e24 is another personal favorite.... a car I really like.... a car that keeps calling me (read: when e30 is finished, Rick will probably be looking for an e24...shhhh)

I think the front end is killer on them. The hood, grille, headlights.... so much of the shark-nose and leaning forward stance that I like. The side view looks good (actually reminds me of a Mark VII) but I can't get used to the rear view of the non-M version... just looks too pinched. There are ways around that and I won't let that stop me though.

The e24 used the M30. The M30 is considered the "big six" and still to this day is one of BMW's largest gasoline inline 6's used in passenger vehicles. It was used in both 3.3 and 3.5 flavors. It is an old engine design from the 70s.

When BMW realized they had more potential with producing smaller displacement 6's instead of larger displacement 4's, they built a new engine spun off the M30 - and the M20 was born, dubbed the "little six", "small six" or "baby six"

This engine is rather neat, to me. The e30 world is split, some love it and some dislike it. The reasons for dislike however are because of the "old school" technology involved with the engine. To me, that is part of the charm.

The engine was designed in the late 60s and 70's. With the exception of an updated engine/fuel management system in the mid 80s (very nice) it shows it. The engine is cast iron, aluminum head. 8.8:1 comrpession, SOHC 12-valve. There are no hydraulic lifters - the valves need to be adjusted. It's got a distrubutor, timing belt and an Air Flow Meter. Unlike a MAP sensor, an AFM uses a "barn door" in the path of the airflow. As throttle is opened and engine demands more air, the door moves open further until it is wide open at WOT. This tells the computer how much air is flowing into the enigne so it can adjust fuel correctly. Obviously this creates another restriction in the airbox, and the AFM does not respond well to quick "blips" of the throttle. Because of that, the engine itself dosen't respond well to quick blips of the throttle - a trait that most all AFM-equipped engines have.

Yet the M20 is super reliable and performs well. Its hard to put its charm into words. But it is a unique mix of old and "new" technology. It has a sound that isn't matched by modern BMW engines too. It's hard to explain but from the ticking of the valves at idle tothe roar at WOT. It is smooth and somewhat refined - it's a BMW I6. Yet it also has a raw feel and raspy sound. The only thing I can compare it to - that compares quite well actually, is the Cadillac 4.9. Those that have owned/experienced that engine know what I mean. It's a Cadillac V8 - it's supposed to be smooth and quiet, yet there is that hint of raw and raspyness that gives the engine its own unique charm.

Actually across the board it seems safe to say that the M20 is to BMW what the 4.9 is to Cadillac.

The above is all a major reason why I am keeping the M20, I'm not about to give up on it and is very cool and unique in an 80's way like the rest of the car. It returns good performance and fuel economy along with amazing reliability. Many of the above comments can be shared with the M30 as well.

These videos were taken a year and a half ago before the car was taken apart. The engine was also in need of tuneup as these videos are taken with the original distrubutor cap and rotor which were really trashed. I could hear/feel a difference when I changed those alone on the jackstands. The car has an ANSA Sport cat-back exhaust.

Poor car needed so much work. The vibration around 60 was from a bent wheel, and I still am shock at what I did in the car with a blown out and trashed suspension as well as 3 out of 4 motor/transmission mounts split in half.

B9ZWjNMVQlQ

b4IYCa3b8Gw

Tz4WYv06b6Y

Those videos really make me miss driving the car - a lot.

Back in the early 90's Mobil was doing a promotion for their Mobil 1 oil. They used 325i's - with the M20. The goal was to put 1,000,000 miles on a car and tear down the engine for inspection. The only maintenace they followed was that spec'd by BMW in the manual. They used more then one car to test longer length oil change intervals - the differences in wear were minimal.

While I agree this is no way to test durability of a car itself, it is moreso for an engine. In the video they explain how they went through heat cycles as well as various speeds etc... Basically what can be learned about these old engines is that if you simply follow the maintenace procedures in the BMW owners manual, these things will not stop.

gHmMlU8Q-V8

Night Wolf
08-27-10, 03:51 AM
I have to ask, it's bothering me...

You have the engine out, pretty much stripped of accessories; you've come so far...Why not pull the head, clean up the valves/, new valve guide seals and a new headgasket? Everything might be in good shape, but then again everything would then be refreshed at once and might give that nice warm fuzzy feeling that you know everything is right and nice. It's got 140k on it and it will never be easier. Don't want to leave the engine half refreshed. As old as it is now age-wise, the valve seals are probably getting brittle and could start cracking and leaking any time now. It'd be a shame if you had this engine out, refreshed half of it, and then started using some oil in a year or two...

Oh stop it you! Don't convince me! :-p

I've thought long and hard about it. If I start digging into the internals the "while I'm in there...." *IS* going to set in. I will end up building a race-spec motor!

Maybe not quite, but I thought about drawing the line at new rings and a valve job. What it really came down to is that up until now, things have been taken apart and removed either for ease of maintenace or to paint and clean up. I am interested from a design standpoint to see how far it'll go. These engines have one main killer - neglected timing belts. Other then that, a broken rocker arm on high mileage modified engines that routinely see 7000+ RPM is heard of now and then. There are a lot of people in various types of racing - auto-x, spec30 and others that have 200k+ and 300k+ on M20s and they keep going.

I al already wayyyy over budget (heh) since I pulled the trans and am replacing the whole clutch system and now changing the steering rack. Even a basic ring/valve job on the engine will add atleast $500 when all said and done. If I pull the head off this thing, I am going to be tempted to build an NA stoker, I know it.... and this is more money.

If in a couple years it blows up or consums more oil then gas, I may be more inclined by then to swap out the M20 for some ///M Power in the form of S50/52 (e36 M3) which, in an e30 will run faster then an e46 M3 stock.

Night Wolf
08-27-10, 03:58 AM
^ He raises a fair point. :lol: Poor Rick, he gets deeper and deeper into this car.

This past weekend was the one-month mark that I started working on the car again after the 10-month sit.

When I look at it, I am surprised by the amount of work I got done on it in such a short amount of time. Even then, I'm really only working on it 1 or 2 days/week.

But this whole time - I am having a fricken blast! I am doing things I never did before and learning a lot. It is just so much fun, I keep looking forawrd to the next small project on this car.

Even more, I keep looking forward to the next car. My mind is already going crazy thinking about getting another e30 to fix up ('91 318is flavor) or an e24. Instead I tell myself to focus that engery on getting this e30 back on the road. This is one of the most fun projects I've yet to encounter.

The biggest thing I am looking forward to doing is driving the car, not staring at it in a garage. I am so excited to finish the car so I can drive it all over and go on crazy trips with it. When I am done with it, as far as I am concerned the car may as well be new and I'd trust it the same or more then any other new car. I plan to drive it as such. I've always wanted to own a car with mega miles that I have put on it - this may just be the car to do it with.

Night Wolf
08-27-10, 04:12 AM
OK, or if he is really determined to NOT pull the head... I changed the valve seals on my 4.9 Cadillac by making an adapter for my air compressor that threads into the spark plug holes. By shooting compressed air in the cylinder you can remove the retainer keepers and replace the valve guide seal without the valve falling into the cylinder, therefore eliminating the need to pull the head.

The only reason I did this because I learned my lesson about head bolt threads in aluminum blocks on another 4.9 and didn't want to go through the unusual hassle of pulling the engine to helicoil the headbolt holes.

But then when using this method, you don't get to install a new headgasket either.

I understand what you are saying, and I did a lot of reading and research on the e30 sites about it.

The common vibe about opening up an M20 that otherwise runs well is "don't fix it if it's not broke", even with 20+ years of age on it. Headgaskets are not a common failure point on these engines, and at this point I'd almost rather leave it be then open it up and disturb it.

Heck, here is a thread about someone asking when is it time to rebuild an M20 and they have 240k on theirs....

http://www.e30tech.com/forum/showthread.php?t=97533


A leak down test might be worth while as well. I put my e in a Lemons race with 235K on the clock. All I did to prep it was change the timing belt, spark plugs, water pump and oil. Still going with decent and consistent compression. Burning a little oil, but I'm building a motor up anyway.


The old M20 in my race car was still going strong at well over 300,000+ km on the clock (getting hammered to 6500 rpm every time it hit the track).

Only replaced it when I built a better engine.

I stripped the engine down after pulling it out, and found that the bores still had the original honing marks, so in other words, it was still sweet.



these engine are made of gold. Easy to work on, and very reliable. I've got over 320k on mine and I can still the see the honing marks on the stock bore. Just maintain it. I wouldn't rebuild/replace until it started burning alot of oil, or knocking.


I never did a compression test on this engine, that is probably something I would be interested in doing - may be difficult while on the hoist, I do have air tools I can turn the crank pully with though.

Night Wolf
08-31-10, 11:08 AM
Sunday Augest 29th:

I got a later start then I wanted to. The plan was first to replace the rear wheel bearings then see how much time is left. This is said to be one of the more difficult e30 jobs that most reccomend taking to a shop. A shop would charge $400-$500 to do this job (from the start, on the car). The first one took me hours, as I was basically trying to figure out how to do it and then made a trip to Lowes.

This message is cat-approved

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings003.jpg

The following Thursday this package arrived. UPS was nice enough to crudely tape up the box they managed to rip in half. Nothing was missing.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings004.jpg

~$135 worth of goodies. Two new parking brake cables, two new rear wheel bearings, front brake caliper rebuild kit, rear brake caliper rebuild kit and a new diff output seal to replace the one I messed up. I bought snap rings for the rear wheel bearings and new nuts for the axles, not realizing the wheel bearing kit already came with both, oh well.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings011.jpg

So I pulled out the trailing arms from the shed

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings012.jpg

The first step was to remove the rear wheel hub from the wheel bearing. Some of your favorite penetrating oil helps

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings013.jpg

I then attemped to make a puller to remove the wheel hub, it was a crude design of various things laying around. All that did was twist up some various pieces of metal I was using.

Big hammers make things fun.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings014.jpg

The socket fit over the hub, but not the bearing - when I went to town. I lucked out and neither of the inner races stuck to the hubs upon removeal, maybe do to the penetrating oil used.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings015.jpg

new bearing

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings016.jpg

removed the disc backing plate, also the large snap ring that keeps the bearing in place.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings017.jpg

Then I went to lowes. I wanted to get a 2" galvinized pipe cap and was informed Lowes dosen't carry anything that large. I then looked around for other things I could use. I saw a bunch of PVC stuff so I figured I'd see how strong it is. I then went to the isle of raw steel and found a welding plate of sutible size and thickness for what I needed. This + a bottle of Gatorade came to about $21, I got $7 back from returning the stuff I didn't use.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings019.jpg

I had this pipe cap which fit inside the hole on the inside of the trailing arm and pressed against the inner race. The idea was to press out the old bearing.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings020.jpg

The bearing didn't press out. I found the strength limits of 3/8" all-thread. Even the steel plate was showing signs of stress.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings021.jpg

This 4lbs sledge has really came in handy working on this car quite a bit. I used that pipe cap which fit against the inner race then had some fun untill it came out.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings022.jpg

I froze the new bearings in hopes they they may microscopically shrink

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings023.jpg

I then used one of the PVC caps, which fit on the outside of the inner trailing arm hole. I drilled a hole in the center of the steel plate. The wide plate actually came in handy as I was able to tighten it up, then hit each side of the plate witht he hammer, which got the bearing to slide in. I used the old bearing to ensure the new bearing was seated all the way. The inside of the trailing arm and outside of the new bearing were coated with anti-seize.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings024.jpg

Night Wolf
08-31-10, 11:36 AM
I used a 1-1/4" socket which fit perfectly inside the wheel bearings. It was positioned between the new and old bearing to keep them inline.

Once the new bearing was lined up properly, it pressed in rather smoothly. A few times it was tightening up and not wanting to snap what was left of my 3/8" all-thread rod, I hit each side of the steel plate with the hammer a few times and it went in, then I went back to tightening it.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings027.jpg

Then put the new snap ring in.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings028.jpg

Then it was time to press on the hub. I applied anti-seize to the inside of the wheel bearing and shaft of the hub. The pipe cap that fit against the inner race was used as it prevents the inner race from falling out. Then the steel plate was used against the hub.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings029.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings030.jpg

Hub in the wheel bearing

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings032.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings031.jpg

It was around that time that I realized I forgot to put the backing plate for the disc on. I first thought about leaving them off, but the parking brake cable uses it for support. Then I thought about cutting it and being able to put it on without removing the hub again. Finally I just decided to remove the hub. While hammering out the hub, it took half the inner race with it.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings037.jpg

Then when I put it back and and attempted to seat it with the hammer, the other half of the inner race came out. I put the inner race back on and left the one on the hub, then pressed it all back together, shouldn't be a problem.

Then I moved to the other trailing arm. I first used a 30mm deepwell socket, but the 1-1/4" was a much better fit. It goes right against the hub, but not the inner race of the bearing and allows the hub to be hammered out.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings034.jpg

I must say, I am very impressed with the strength of the PVC cap in this application. I was not expecting it to hold up - PVC FTW.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings039.jpg

Trailing arms with new bearings in place. I was going to paint all the parts seperately, but then I just wanted to get it done. I will clean and paint these as a unit at some point

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings040.jpg

Here is a video comparing the new and old bearings. This is the bearing that was making a lot of noise, the other one was nearly quiet, either way if I was changing one, they were both getting repalced. Nice to know I won't have to worry about these things again.

D5QwqC4bQZk

I spent the better part of the day replacing those wheel bearings. Most of the time was spent figuring out how to remove/install the hubs and bearings, and making a trip to Lowes for supplies. Still, I wanted to get more done then -just- the wheel bearings.

I ordered these things last year. new bushings for the rear sway bar as well as rear sway bar links. I later found out that unless the swaybar to chassis bushings are missing, they don't need to be replaced, but I already bought them.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings041.jpg

Here the old parking brake cable can be seen as well. It is a rather neat design as there are tubes that are part of the car the cable slides into. Each cable goes to the parking brake. Remove the nut at the parking brake handle and the cable just slides right out. The old inner rear rubber brake lines are still in place. Those are the ones difficult to get at when the rear subframe is installed. I ordered a set of stainless steel braided/coated lines from UUC but they are on back order.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings042.jpg

New vs old parking brake cables. The old ones were broke, but the parking brake didn't work before. I didn't want to start using the parking brake and have one brake, so they got repalced.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings043.jpg

They come up through the floor and attach to the parking brake handle. Each cable (and thus left/right parking brake) can be adjusted seperately.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings046.jpg

New sway bar bushings and links, and parking brake cables installed. Still waiting on new brake lines to arrive. Also when I was under the car I noticed the rubber hose going from the fuel filler to the tank. I didn't see that before and that will be getting added to the next order of parts.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/8-29-10%20wheel%20bearings/Wheelbearings047.jpg

Technically I can put all the components of the rear subframe together and install it now. I am going to wait until the brake lines arrive, as I also want to clean and paint the rest of the components up. Hopefully by the time that is all done, the brake lines will be here and the entire rear subframe can be installed as a unit. Other then shocks/springs, the rear subframe/driveline/suspension will be completed, which is a big step towards getting the car back on the road.

drewsdeville
08-31-10, 12:01 PM
Hopefully that one bearing holds up over time. If either half of the inner race isn't seated all the way, was warped at all or damaged in any way, clearance could accumulate, eventually causing the hub to spin in the bearing...

Somewhat similar to the way I press them though, minus the materials used. :thumbsup: for DIY ingenuity.

BTW, do you have a timeframe for finishing or are you just going along leisurely?

Night Wolf
08-31-10, 12:13 PM
Hopefully that one bearing holds up over time. If either half of the inner race isn't seated all the way, was warped at all or damaged in any way, clearance could accumulate, eventually causing the hub to spin in the bearing...

Somewhat similar to the way I press them though, minus the materials used. :thumbsup: for DIY ingenuity.

BTW, do you have a timeframe for finishing or are you just going along leisurely?

I was wondering about the bearing too. The outter inner race is pressed up directly against the hub and isn't going anywhere. The inner, inner race was then pressed back on using the cap when I pressed the hub back on. It dosen't seem like it is going anywhere and I can't tell a difference between the two.

If it ever needs to be replaced in the future, it can be done on the car, just remove the CV axle. The important thing is that I now know how to do it and feel confident in being able to replace them on or off the car in the future, or do the job on other cars.

As tight as those hubs are pressed on into the bearings, I don't think they'll ever spin. I see total bearing failure before the hubs spin.

As for a time frame - there is no set date. I did nothing at all on this thing for 10-months, now I am working on it. I work on it when/as I feel. I typically work saturdays for overtime (trying to get the car done) and Sundays I spend on the car, sometimes I work on it durring the week.

Since I no longer have money set aside for buying more stuff for the car, every payday I order parts I think I'll need in the upcoming projects and as they arrive I complete them. In between that, there is plenty of stuff to clean up and paint.

Time to complete really depends on money. I was kinda-sorta hoping to have it done by Columbus day, as it was that weekend, 2 years ago I boguht the car. It's already a 3-day weekend for me, and I wanted to add another day or two and take the car on a nice long road trip.

I'll be busy the next 1-2 weeks and probably will not get much done in the way of the car, but after that I should be able to put alot of time into it again.

Kev
09-02-10, 01:50 AM
Rick, just a thought for the intake. You could have it bead blasted and then apply a durable clear coat to keep it clean.

Night Wolf
09-02-10, 04:31 AM
Rick, just a thought for the intake. You could have it bead blasted and then apply a durable clear coat to keep it clean.

The intake is aluminum. Given the time, it could be polished to a mirror shine.

I think I'm going to clean it up, probably wire wheel/bristle brushes and paint it. I am thinking about painting the lower portion black and the upper portion silver (same "aluminum" silver used for the diff cover) then painting the raised stripes/BMW roundel black.... basically a reversed contrast of the valve cover.

I thought about doing the intake manifold the same was as the valve cover.... but it just looks like *too* much black in the engine bay. Plus the hood insulation rubs part of the intake and would wear the black paint off, atleast with the aluminum paint it would blend, not that it would be difficult to touch up.

Here is an M20 with the same theme on the valve cover and intake.... I'm thinking about reversing the intake.

http://oldmary.lqhome.com/~jordansarette/coppermine/albums/2006/March2006/normal_033006-001.jpg

http://oldmary.lqhome.com/~jordansarette/coppermine/albums/2006/March2006/normal_033006-002.jpg

damn headers look soo good.... the cheap ones don't do much and require modification of the rest of the exhaust, the $1,000 ones flow better.... but are $1,000.....

http://oldmary.lqhome.com/~jordansarette/coppermine/albums/2006/March2006/normal_033006-003.jpg

I wonder how many cans of paint it would take to make my engine bay look like this....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v517/M_ER_CU_RY/done-1.jpg

^ actually adds minimal weight (like 70lbs) and between engine and trans, the weight is positioned more rearward.... keeping the 50/50 weight balance of the car....

Or ///M flavor...

http://oldmary.lqhome.com/~jordansarette/coppermine/albums/318iS/Pictures/2009/April%202009/normal_041809-002.JPG

For Jesda... SAAB 9000 turbo.... driving the proper set of wheels....

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m43/ohlins8990/gx17z6k0-d276793d7fdb02f85d5ddf7f3e.jpg

back to the M20....

The black/silver intake is starting to grow on me though. It would be easy to do as well. It's a nice and clean look that goes along with my intentions of the car - a clean but well performing daily driver.... ahhh I dunno what to do now...

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/bmwlover0725/IMG_0161.jpg

drewsdeville
09-02-10, 10:57 AM
The black/silver intake is starting to grow on me though. It would be easy to do as well. It's a nice and clean look that goes along with my intentions of the car - a clean but well performing daily driver.... ahhh I dunno what to do now...



You'd have lots of time to think about it if you'd pull the head to clean it up and replace the valve stem seals...

:devil:

Night Wolf
09-02-10, 05:49 PM
You'd have lots of time to think about it if you'd pull the head to clean it up and replace the valve stem seals...

:devil:

but then I'd want to replace the rings which means the crank and rods come out which means......

So where does it stop?

drewsdeville
09-02-10, 06:03 PM
When you are done. :cool2:

I personally wouldn't even touch the bottom end. Why would you feel the need to do the rings? If this was 1960, I might agree, but there would be no benefit from doing so on this more modern engine.

Valve stem seals fail as they age...those rubber seals are 20 years old now, baked in 200 degree oil some of the time, perhaps dried out at other times of minimal usage. They are probably brittle and hard as rocks by now.

Plus, it's cheap and at this point, easy. You can probably get a set of seals for $10-$15

If you plan to drive this car and keep it nice for more than a few years, I'd almost say it's necessary,. In another 10 years those seals will be 30 years old and would most likely need replacement by then.

The rings, as long as the engine was treated to a working air filter, pcv system, and oil changes, should be just fine. You should be able to roughly gauge how the rings are doing by inspecting the plugs and cylinder walls and by running a compression test.

Night Wolf
09-12-10, 11:53 PM
Today was a major turning point in the entire project of the car. For the first time, other then little odds and ends, something major has been completed and installed back on the car. The project was the rear subframe. This is bouns because it was one of the first main hurdles of the project as removing it is said to be one of the biggest projects on e30s. I felt overwhelmed and let it sit for months until one day finally deciding that it is going to come out.

It was exactly 1 year ago Ted came over and helped me remove the thing. In a way it dosen't seem that long at all - but I spent 10-months doing nothing on the car.

September 2009

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/BMWrearsubframe018.jpg

The drivers side bushing broke off in the car upon removeal. I removed it using a method that I should have did when the sub frame was still attachted to the car, before the bushing broke. Here is the 20-year old subframe assembly, worn out rubber bushings, leaking, torn boots and all.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/BMWrearsubframe019.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/BMWrearsubframe020.jpg

I then removed the subframe from the trailing arms and diff. The factory bushings are rubber, which are pressed in. This is by far the cheapest, quickest, easiest and most fun way of removing them.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip228.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip232.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip234.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip242.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip250.jpg

After it burns a while the metal center core drops out

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip254.jpg

But it still leaves the outter sleeve. Once it is nice and hot a BFH and screw driver get it out.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip255.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/NYtrip256.jpg

After that was done, the subframe was stored in the shed while the diff/axles/trailing arms remained outside and I didn't touch the car for 10-months, mostly because I got overwhelmed with the "I'm never going to finish it" feeling, until this past July when I had enough of it and told myself it is getting done. That is when this thread started.

Today, September 12, 2010

My braided stainless steel brake lines came in from being on back order. They are from UUC, a high quality company right here in GA. These lines have a cool blue plastic coating on them to keep dirt/debris from getting into the sttel braid, which in turn can wear into the lines and cause leaks. They are also DOT approved. $120 for all 6 was a fair price.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines001.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines003.jpg

Night Wolf
09-13-10, 12:10 AM
For the first time in 10-months I pulled the subframe out of the shed. I then went on a hunt to collect all the parts for it. Most I found in the shed, the new poly trailing arm and sub frame bushings were still in their new packaging and in a box of new parts in the workshop shed (bushings were bought 1.5yrs ago). The only thing left to find was the hardware for the diff and trailing arms - I could not locate them. After looking through both sheds I asked myself "Where would I put the hardware to store for later use - 1 year ago". My answer was "the trunk" Sure enough right on top of a bunch of other stuff was the bag of hardware. Funny thing since I had the trunk emptied out not too long ago. I simply removed everything and put it on the ground then put everything back in with out thinking much into it.

mmmmm yucky subframe

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines021.jpg

Between lots of heat, melting rubber and rust, it wasn't looking so good.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines022.jpg

I used a steel wire brush ans tried cleaning it up, but it wasn't doing a darn thing, whatever rubber was left was just globbing up. I then took a selection of wire wheels and sanding discs and my 18v corded drill and had some fun

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines023.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines024.jpg

I didn't get them perfect, as that is not the goal. The rust is removed any the surface was gone over to prepare for paint.

Over to the hi-tek paint lab we go...

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines025.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines026.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/SSbrakelines027.jpg

Overall they came out good. Plenty good enough for pretty much never being seen under the car. I knew these parts would take some scrapes/chips during the install process but touch-up would be easy.

Got the parts together

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall001.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall002.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall003.jpg

including the hardware bag that took about an hour to find

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall004.jpg

test fit of the bolts - still good. I cleaned the threads up with the steel wire brush and applied anti-seize.... today was a good day for anti-seize

mmmm rusty bolts

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall006.jpg

mmmm painted bolts

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall007.jpg

RippyPartsDept
09-13-10, 12:23 AM
dude, i'm totally loving this thread - even if it makes my old PC cry every time i open it up (too many pictures!!)
but keep em coming - love to see this kind of stuff

Night Wolf
09-13-10, 12:32 AM
To prevent the poly bushings from squeeking they need to be liberally greased. I was going to use a synthetic lithium chassis grease but then did some reading any many reccomended to use regular anti-seize. From what I gather, the grease will dry up over time and cause squeeks, when the anti-seize dries up it leaves behind a residue that should prevent squeeking. Being liberal with the anti-seize means things are gonna get messy.

I was able to easy bump the poly trailing arm bushings in with the small hammer, but trying to get the inner metal sleeve in with the hammer was not working... so I pulled out my trusty 3/8" all-thread that has been over stressed and not used for its intended purpose. What a good little group of hardware.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall008.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall009.jpg

Once the entire e30 project is done, I don't think this thing is going to have much useful life left - but it treated me oh so well

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall010.jpg

BAM!

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall011.jpg

Then it was time to put the trailing arm on the sub frame. I was first fighting with it to line up then trying to hammer it in - all that was doing was starting to tear up the poly bushings. Realizing that once it is all together it is going to tighten up against the inner metal sleeve, I then took the hammer and tapped the slots apart a bit - trailing arm slipped right in and when I tightened it down it all came together very nice.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall012.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall013.jpg

Then the CV axles went in. I was only able to get the bolts holding them to the diff so tight before it kept turning. Not a big deal though as once the car is back on the ground with tires, I am going to go over all the hardware for the rear subframe and tighten them up

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall014.jpg

The poly subframe bushings were easy enough - again liberal amounts of anti-seize was used. They are a 2-piece design and just slipped in. The steel washers on top had to be slightly opened up with a file to fit over the center sleeve.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall015.jpg

drewsdeville
09-13-10, 12:50 AM
Kendall L-427 Super Blu is pretty much the best multipurpose high pressure grease that money can buy.

I've been using it for chassis lubes since I could turn a wrench...have yet to replace a ball joint or tie rod end on any of my personal vehicles :)

It's oil based rather than soap-based like most other greases on the market. It doesn't wash away.

Night Wolf
09-13-10, 12:54 AM
The subframe mounts to the chassis in two places. This long "bolt" gets installed from the inside. Normally it is under the rear seat but on the convertible it is tucked away in the corner. The head of the "bolt" has splines that fit into the body, so it dosen't need to be held. I put them in and felt them engage then used the same purpose-bent steel rod I used for removing the broken bushing from the chassis. I placed the rod in the hole above the head of the "bolt" and hit it with the hammer to get it to seat.

Then, again liberal amounts of anti-seize were applied

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall016.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall018.jpg

Now it was ready for the big show.... to get the subframe back onto the car. Getting it down was easy enough as it was already on the car. Getting it from the ground to the car was the difficult part. It was slid under the car and through a series of events with ply wood, pieces of 2x4, a pry bar and the jack we got it supported by the jack, and were able to move it around, and of course use the floor jack to raise it.

My mother is visiting me for a few days, and I knew this task would require two people, atleast one to help support the whole thing (balancing on 1 floor jack) and help line up the rods into the bushings etc...

I wasn't expecting my mom to get so into it and have fun working on the car though. She was an aircraft mechanic in the Air Force and later the Air National Guard - she loved her job but was medically discharged in 1998 due to a bad car accident. She came up with pretty neat ideas to help get the whole subframe assembly on the plywood from the ground, to resting on the jack (including the plywood). Due to the weight and design of it, it is very difficult, if not impossible for us to simply lift it up. As we were working on the car she said "this is fun.... it reminds me of working on the airplanes" then in typical female fashion commented about not wearing makeup when I took some pics of her working on the car.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall019.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall022.jpg

and with that, the subframe assembly was now once again part of the car

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall023.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall024.jpg

The new inner rear brake lines, also the new parking brake cables. These brake lines are not as hard to get at with the subframe installed as I thought they would be.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall029.jpg

I then loosely installed other things like the sway bar brackets etc... It is all going to get tightened when the car is on the ground, but atleast it is together now.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall031.jpg

While laying under the car, I couldn't help but notice how ugly the heat sheild for the muffler looked

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall034.jpg

So that was removed and painted with hi-temp paint. I didn't let it dry long enough before handling it, but it dosen't really matter, there will be a muffler under it.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall035.jpg

I then had a bit of the paint left over from painting the subframe and trailing arms, so I went back and touched up the areas that got scraped from installing it. I also painted the inner portion of the CV axles that bolts to the diff, spray a section turn the axles spray and it was done.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/9-12-10%20subframe%20install/subframeinstall036.jpg

This is major progress. If I did not decide to pull the engine, the only thing left would have been to install the driveshaft, front steering/suspension, exhaust, then springs and shocks. But now it is a bit more with various engine work getting done, clutch replacement, steering rack swap etc... It'll be worth it though. I am so glad to get the rear subframe assembly back in the car.

Night Wolf
09-13-10, 01:00 AM
Kendall L-427 Super Blu is pretty much the best multipurpose high pressure grease that money can buy.

I've been using it for chassis lubes since I could turn a wrench...have yet to replace a ball joint or tie rod end on any of my personal vehicles :)

It's oil based rather than soap-based like most other greases on the market. It doesn't wash away.

Never heard of it. Too late to use on the e30, but I'll try to get some for the future. Right now I have 2 grease guns, one for the Jeep and one for the BMW.... are you saying that would ok to replace both and use, compatible with the current stuff? Where do you get it?

BTW, I'm taking your advice and going to replace the valve steam seals.... most likely end up pulling the head, getting a 3-angle valve job, cleaning everything up, new valve seals and back together. Anything more wouldn't make sense on my plans to keep the engine stock. It's gonna delay the overall project some, but there are plenty of things to keep me busy with it during the process.

RippyPartsDept
09-13-10, 01:06 AM
yeah, we use Super Blu at our shop... we buy it by the case
when an H1 comes in the shop for service we use about two tubes lubing up the chassis
there's so many grease fittings on those things that the H1 tech got a battery powered lube gun after doing two H1s with the hand pump (caulking gun style)

drewsdeville
09-13-10, 01:09 AM
yeah, we use Super Blu at our shop... we buy it by the case

I buy it by the case as well as I have an inside hookup through a distributor. Unfortunately, I'm not sure where you'd pick it up otherwise. You could probably find out online.

Night Wolf
09-13-10, 01:14 AM
For greasing the aircraft at work we have a pneumatic grease gun that makes jobs quick..... there is also a bunch of WTR.... not sure how that compares to super-blu.....

gdwriter
09-13-10, 02:42 AM
Pretty cool that your Mom could help you out this weekend. My Dad spent most of his USAF career as a crew chief on the B-52, and what little mechanical ability I have comes from helping him maintain our cars when I was a kid, including helping him reinstall two engines he had rebuilt on a '62 Falcon and the '64 Impala I grew up with. Sure, it was mostly handing him wrenches or holding things in place, but if I did not (unfortunately) inherit his mechanical skill, I at least gained an appreciation for it. I know he was impressed when I managed to change out Cruella's heater core all by myself a few years ago, and that made me proud. I still wish I had more of his ability, though.

gary88
09-13-10, 01:53 PM
Mom working on the e30 FTW. Extra points for not using a creeper.

Night Wolf
09-14-10, 12:56 AM
I asked her if the wanted to use the creeper, she said no since she was pretty much staying still while I was moving around a bunch.

Playdrv4me
09-14-10, 03:57 PM
Keep the updates coming!

Night Wolf
09-24-10, 12:46 PM
Now that my time is divided between Noelle and the 528e, progress is slowing down - but it is still getting done.

Last weekend when I degreased the 528e, I also degreased the e30's engine bay and engine. I am going to get an engine stand and then take the head off the block so I can take it to a machine shop and get a valve job and new valve seals.

So, I pulled the hood off and this is the fun 21 year old 140k mess

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime011.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime012.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime013.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime015.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime014.jpg

and the engine

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime016.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime017.jpg

All I used was Awesome and the pressure washer. Once the engine is further disassembled, it'll be cleaned a bit more, then things will be painted as it is built back up.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime037.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime038.jpg

The degreased engine bay. I think I'm going to wash it down by hand and wax it while I have easy access to everything... should help keep it clean for the future.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime039.jpg

While the convertible chassis is not as rigid as the fixed roof, it has been built up in various areas... such as the strut towers, A-pillar area and doors. This car will get an underbody X-brace and oil pan skid some time in the future, possibly a strut tower brace as well.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime040.jpg

All this is original - 21 years and 140k daily driven miles later

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime041.jpg

The steering rack will be replaced with an e36 unit - 3.2 turns lock to lock vs 4.0, plus it is more durable, though mine was operating fine and not leaking.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime042.jpg

drewsdeville
09-24-10, 01:00 PM
All this is original - 21 years and 140k daily driven miles later

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW/degrease%209-18-10/e28degrime041.jpg



This is foreign to me...you'll never find 20 year old galvanized steel brake lines that look like that here in WI.

At least manufacturers epoxy coat them now.

EDIT: or wait, I can't tell on this monitor...those ARE epoxy coated? If so, that's pretty rare for the times.

Night Wolf
09-26-10, 06:45 AM
They look expoxy coated to me... same with the '87 528e:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/removal/interiorremoval001.jpg

ABS pump:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/removal/interiorremoval002.jpg

It's a BM-Dubya man ;)

Night Wolf
09-26-10, 07:27 PM
Not much was done on the e30 today as I spent most of the time on the e28, then it started to rain.

But a friend is letting me use his engine stand. I used to have one just like this then gave it away because I never once used it. I'm glad to get the engine on the stand and not hanging anymore. Only thing really left is to remove the timing belt and pull the head, then take the head to a machine shop.... then it'll be at the build up stage.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/Fixup/fixup042.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/Fixup/fixup044.jpg

I removed the valve cover but that was pretty much it... then the stand was pushed under the hoist and the whole hoist covered with a tarp.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/Fixup/fixup047.jpg

Looks just as I remember it, nothing new. original with 140k miles. The "i" version has dual valve springs and 7 cam support bearings along with a hot cam. The eta engine has single valve springs (lower revving) and only 4 cam support bearigns (for less internal friction - max fuel mileage) and the cam is tuned for low-RPM torque... then again everything on that engine is - intake/head/exhaust. Not as fast as the "i" but respectable in its' own right especially in the gas mileage it returns, not that the "i" was a gas hog though.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e363/InoventionsEast/BMW%20e28/Fixup/fixup048.jpg