: House with no walls?



OffThaHorseCEO
07-25-10, 09:56 PM
I dont know if ive mentioned it before or not, but my gf and I are looking to buy a house.

My GF found something that SOUNDS like a good deal, and we've talked about it alot. I'm trying to get as many opinions as possible.

So, the house is listed as a 3 bedroom 2 bath home, 2100-2200 sq ft.
2 car garage (my ONLY "requirement")
its sitting on "3-5 acres of land"
again 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, an attic "bonus room", a formal dining room, breakfast area, a deck and ALSO a screened deck or whatever thats called
http://easyads.net/data/user/165646/homes/180349/180349_2.jpghttp://easyads.net/data/user/165646/homes/180349/180349_3.jpg
front and back of house, the thing is the middle is the deck and to the right is the part that can be screened in

and its listed at only $120,000. its right off of the highway i take to work, and all the roads that lead to and from it are very smooth, freshly paved. the area is pretty nice and the house is detached but not isolated. basically country living but not middle of nowhere living.

now the downsides....it has NO WALLS. it has wall frames, and it has light fixtures and it has all the plumbing, wiring, and AC ducting in it. But no walls. also, a downside to me is it has a well and septic system, and the water pump isnt there. Being that its country i dont think high speed internet is available there, cell coverage was moderate, with no 3G.
http://easyads.net/data/user/165646/homes/180349/180349_4.jpghttp://easyads.net/data/user/165646/homes/180349/180349_11.jpg wall frames and attic "bonus room". i think the bonus room will be for fights and movies

Of course we need to find out why they stopped building it.

Our plan is to buy it, then build a room at a time. We're hoping for a rate of a room every two months, with the bedroom being first and kitchen and master bathroom being last.

We've calculated and we'll have up to 2k/month to spend on building the rooms after all our expenses included the hypothetical mortgage. My family is full of individuals who build homes for a living, and I have a few favors i can call in. Our costs would mainly consist of materials.

If we wanted to get it done faster, we're not above living very frugally until its done. as it is, we live in a low rent area, and shop cheaply and grow some of our own food.

So are we crazy for even considering this? Are we in over our heads? Neither of us has owned a home before. However if we were to get this one, it would most definitely be a long term home. As in REALLY long term. Its good to know we can customize to an extent and its basically a brand new home.

Opinions advice and warnings please!

77CDV
07-25-10, 10:03 PM
Could be a spec or retirement house where the builder just ran out of money. Talk to the listing agent to find out why and when construction was stopped. If it all checks out, then you have to decide whether you can live in a house that will be under construction for a time. If it doesn't have running water and such, it may not be legal to live in it. Check with the county building office to see if the house has been issued a certificate of occupancy, and whether it's been constructed to code with the required permits. There's a lot to consider here, well before such niceties as internet and 3G connections.

Good luck!

ga_etc
07-25-10, 10:09 PM
I think it's a good looking house, but I wouldn't give $120k for it being unfinished, personally. If you could get it for $100k, I think it would be worth it. When the market is back and the house is completed I would estimate it to appraise for $150-175k depending on how elaborate you got with the interior. Not to mention 3+ acres of property. My opinion is based on what I have seen around here.

codewize
07-25-10, 10:23 PM
That's a handyman's dream. If you like the floor plan and the location that's an awesome situation.

You can finish that however you want. You have the opportunity to put plumbing, mechanical and electrical wherever and however you like.

I wish I had that opportunity.

In many places you won't be able to move in until the house is 100% and you're probably looking at $100k to finish that depending on your taste.

There's nothing wrong with a well and septic, however, no broadband would be a deal breaker for me, flat out.

OffThaHorseCEO
07-25-10, 10:51 PM
you're probably looking at $100k to finish that depending on your taste.
we dont want to go too high dollar, but we dont want materials we'll have to replace in 5 years either. Again most of our costs would be materials. My uncle has a painting business, hes been doing residential and commercial painting for over 15 years or more. My brother from another mother does plumbing on new homes. 2 of my brothers hung drywall for a long time. my gfs dad is an electrician. my other uncle works glass and has done tiling in a few homes. overall we have most of the jobs covered. obviously we'll have to put out for licenses, certifications inspections materials and maybe some jobs we dont have a person for. but i think our labor costs will be very low


There's nothing wrong with a well and septic, however, no broadband would be a deal breaker for me, flat out.

yea, to some its a luxury. to me things like 3G and good cell reception are job requirements. my job is where my money comes from. if job performance suffers, the house doesnt get built. makes it a necessity and not a luxury

as far as well water, in north carolina there are alot of places where well water comes out rusty and screws up all your clothing and your toilets and your shower and bath tub. its nasty and makes the cleanest bathroom look like shit. id have to see the water

the recluse
07-25-10, 10:54 PM
You will NOT be able to get your C.O. (Certificate of Occupancy) and move into the house until it's finished, so, no, you can't finish it one room at a time and live in it.

The first rooms you would have to finish first would be the kitchen and at least one bathroom, which is not a cheap endeavor. Although I can't see more than $20k to $30k to finish off the house.

As mentioned earlier, it is NOT worth $120k, pick it up for $100k. Also with no C.O., you will have a mortgage and rental payments. Thoughts to ponder...

hueterm
07-25-10, 10:56 PM
You can get satellite broadband, but it's $$$ for what you get. Septic would be OK, but I wouldn't want well water...

If you can do the work yourself or with help (and cheaply) it would be a great deal if you want that much land.

I hate to mow, so 5 acres to me would be pointless. I bet there are a lot of foreclosed homes in town that would be good deals too...

Bro-Ham
07-25-10, 11:05 PM
make sure you put in a tiki lounge. :)

dkozloski
07-25-10, 11:16 PM
To get past the C of O just drag in a travel trailer or camper to live in until the house is habitable. If you get it to a point you can probably get a temporary C of O that can be renewed as you go along. If you like to camp out and rough it you're in for a great experience. If you or the rest of your family is candy assed it'll terminate in a murder. 50% of the houses around here are owner built a room at a time. My house is 60 years old and it isn't finished yet.

codewize
07-26-10, 02:11 AM
No way, I bought a 1400 sq ft house and I'm doing all the work myself. I've got over $40k in JUST materials in my kitchen. My cabinets were 15 to have them dropped in my driveway.

I heard him say labor wasn't an issue and I'm telling you when it's all said and done I'd very very impressed if you under $80k even if you use the cheapest of everything.

Insulation alone is probably $10k.

It's also going to be very difficult to get a loan on that house. Banks are very leery to lend at all let alone on a house with no CO. I don't know what real estate costs in NC but I'd love the opportunity to be in that situation.


You will NOT be able to get your C.O. (Certificate of Occupancy) and move into the house until it's finished, so, no, you can't finish it one room at a time and live in it.

The first rooms you would have to finish first would be the kitchen and at least one bathroom, which is not a cheap endeavor. Although I can't see more than $20k to $30k to finish off the house.

As mentioned earlier, it is NOT worth $120k, pick it up for $100k. Also with no C.O., you will have a mortgage and rental payments. Thoughts to ponder...

Jesda
07-26-10, 02:17 AM
You'd be paying $100/mo for Wildblue satellite.

C&C
07-26-10, 05:32 AM
That house, while looking almost done, is just beginning to cost money (to complete); interior work is expensive for material and now your requirements will be for a finish carpenter, which is also higher cost.

ewill3rd
07-26-10, 06:43 AM
Personally I'd say no.
I'd say you can find a house that is finished even if it is off the beaten path for a fair price.
You can't live in a house and work on it like that, you have to have your final permits before you can move in these days and that house would be a permit nightmare.
I'd check with your county to see what kind of information they have on it.
It is possible the county made them stop for some zoning reason.
Regardless, it isn't going to be nearly the simple project you think.
I have been trying (by myself) to finish the basement for almost 6 years and although it looks like I am making progress, "snails pace" is an understatement.
The next real issue would be relying on all those people to help.
People have personal stuff to deal with and they flake on you. The promise to show when you tell them and then they forget or something comes up and you are working on it by yourself.
Having owned several homes over the years I can tell you that house will likely turn into a "Nightmare on Elm Street".
If we are voting here, my ballot is for "no".

Brett
07-26-10, 07:47 AM
-You cant move into it until it's finished
-interior materials can cost a ton, there is a lot to be done
-it will be hard to get financing to buy it, you may need cash or a private lender

OffThaHorseCEO
07-26-10, 10:23 AM
yea, after reading all these posts. and talking to all the people i mentioned above who are in the know about the local laws and requirements. i think its gonna be no.

thanks guys for giving me a reality check

iowasevillests
07-26-10, 01:15 PM
The only thing about it that would concern me is getting the loan on it since its not finished, as others said would likely need a bathroom and kitchen done before most lenders would loan to you on it, then the loan to value figures might get interesting.....

Far as satellite I'd stay away, I had Wildblue through DirectTV, was about 70 a month and hated it. Average lags of 1000ms(yes 1000) and max dl'd speed was in that 200kb/s and that was rare. I almost dropped back to dialup cause it would've had less lag but they got DSL turned on to my place so didn't have to.

Septic doesn't bother me, I have one and its not a problem, just watch the use of bleach as it kills the bacteria in it. Well just means you have to pay abit more attention to the water but means no water bill. Get it tested before you get very far in the process if you're still interested, most county health depts. will sample and test the water for free, otherwise a local testing lab will probably run you about 30 bucks plus shipping/supplies.

orconn
07-26-10, 05:05 PM
Here in the Richmond,VA area, out in the country, that house wouldn't bring even close to $120,000., if you could find a source of financing anywhere. With the cost of gas likely to head higher over the next decade far out properties will become far less attrative to potential buyers. Because it is still very much a buyers market out ther I 'd be looking to get a lot more value for my money. If you haven't already tired to get pre-approval for a loan to buy a house I would make that my first step on the way to looking for a new home.

dkozloski
07-26-10, 06:42 PM
It's amazing how cultures differ. Around here nobody gives a rat's ass about a C of O. Banks are ready to loan people money for owner built houses. That being said, most of the owner built houses are pay as you go by people who hate debt. People live for years in partially finished houses and nobody gives it a second thought. A young couple will live in a shack and bank every spare dime until they can afford to buy a lot and put up some kind of habitable structure. From there it's pay as you go and the only C of O you need is a pump action shotgun alongside the kitchen door. The house a couple of lots over from me took five or six years to finish, the owner lived there the whole time, and most of the time had renters as well that helped with the work. It's a beautiful 4000 sq.ft. house that was built around an old existing log cabin. When the house was nearing completion the cabin was torn down and taken out through the door. Around here the inspectors and bureaucrats know that they are on thin ice and are very respectful to the people they deal with. In societies where the bureaucrats have the upper hand they walk all over you. What the hell business is it of anybody's if you're trying to build a house for your family out in the country? Around here you might get shot nosing around somebody's property asking sensitive questions. Civilization isn't all it's cracked up to be.

ga_etc
07-26-10, 06:56 PM
Here in the Richmond,VA area, out in the country, that house wouldn't bring even close to $120,000.

I think I know were I need to move...

the recluse
07-26-10, 08:07 PM
No way, I bought a 1400 sq ft house and I'm doing all the work myself. I've got over $40k in JUST materials in my kitchen. My cabinets were 15 to have them dropped in my driveway.

I heard him say labor wasn't an issue and I'm telling you when it's all said and done I'd very very impressed if you under $80k even if you use the cheapest of everything.

Insulation alone is probably $10k.

It's also going to be very difficult to get a loan on that house. Banks are very leery to lend at all let alone on a house with no CO. I don't know what real estate costs in NC but I'd love the opportunity to be in that situation.

First off, you're in upper state NY, so just walking out of your house costs you an outrageous amount of money. :thepan:

I've been in the contracting field(s) here in Florida for quite awhile and my career field is cabinetry. I once designed, built, and DELIVERED a kitchen to Manhattan (rented the truck and drove it there myself) because it was cheaper for the home owners than buying one off the shelf at a local builder supply in New York.

That said, the house being about 2000 sq. ft. is only going to have about 1440 sq. ft. of walls (exterior only) and the 2000 sq. ft. of ceiling to insulate for a cost of about $1300 (a batt of R-19 covers 163 sq. ft. and costs $60 at Loews).

The drywall and materials to finish should come to about $1500. Back in the 70's the building plans for houses weren't as open, so you'd figure approximate sq. ft. under roof times 3 for sq. ft. of wall space. Today's open floor plans I'd prolly go times 2. With ceilings you'd need about 150 sheets of material at a cost of $6.50, with tax, that's $1000 for drywall, now add mud, tape, and primer/surfacer, $1500.

I now have the house insulated and rocked for $2800.

Electrical already looked there, so other than fixtures, you can rule that out. Fixtures can be expensive in their own right, but reasonable "contractor" fixtures should be about $1000 to get the place lit. Add plugs and switches for another $100.

I now have the house insulated, rocked, and am able to plug things in and see for $4000.

The Carolina's were once home to many kitchen cabinet manufacturers that offered good products at reasonable prices and I can't see where you couldn't do your kitchen and bath's for $15,000. At wholesale I could do it for half that, but he doesn't have that luxury.

Now with a $30000 investment, that should leave you with $11,000 to put in toilets, appliances, and casework, plenty if you get "reasonable" items.

There is a reason why people move to places like the Carolina's and Florida, you dollar goes a whole lot farther, unless you live in South Florida, or should I say Southern New York, as everything is expensive down there.

Stingroo
07-26-10, 09:20 PM
loololol South Florida. Let's not even talk about that. Please. I have bad scary memories.

codewize
07-26-10, 11:48 PM
I was in the drywall business for 14 years. a bucket of joint compound is $15 and covers about 700 sq ft. A 2200 sq ft home is going to have about 5000 - 6000 sq ft of sheetrock. At $.30 foot that's $1700 for rock, $120 for compound, at I'd guess you're looking at $1000 - $1500 for insulation based on you're costs.

That's almost $4000 before any labor, paint, etc. Appliances alone are $5000, maybe more.

I'm not arguing but I think you're looking at a very substantial cost to make that home complete. I was in the building game for a long time and they're correct when they said that house is at the point where the spending begins.

the recluse
07-28-10, 05:08 PM
...they're correct when they said that house is at the point where the spending begins.

Agreed. My costs were based on JUST getting you in the door and that's it; down and dirty....:cool:

I really think the biggest difference is the pricing from FL to NY and all points in between.

Peace bro :highfive:

dkozloski
07-29-10, 12:19 AM
Who needs drywall to get something to move into? Insulate the outside walls and ceiling, cover it with a vapor barrier, and you're good to go. The fancy pants drywall can wait. In the areas where the vapor barrier might get snagged you can protect it by stapling up some corrugated cardboard.

codewize
07-29-10, 10:24 AM
You can't live in a house without a CO and you're not going to get a CO on a brand new build without it being 100% complete.


Who needs drywall to get something to move into? Insulate the outside walls and ceiling, cover it with a vapor barrier, and you're good to go. The fancy pants drywall can wait. In the areas where the vapor barrier might get snagged you can protect it by stapling up some corrugated cardboard.

Mark0101
07-29-10, 11:08 AM
It would help a lot if the OP could show us what else you can get for 120,000 in his area. Supplies are not that much and he already said he can do labor at a very low price since his friends/family members can help.

dkozloski
07-29-10, 01:30 PM
You can't live in a house without a CO and you're not going to get a CO on a brand new build without it being 100% complete.
Baloney. Around here, anything goes. I've never seen or heard of a C of O requirement locally and neither has anybody else I know. The only thing the building inspectors care about is the technical aspects of whatever their particiular discipline is.

Apparently the sheeple in the lower 48 have let the bureaucrats run right over them and take control of their lives. Around here the people are very protective of personal freedoms.

Rental properties and commercial structures are a different kettle of fish but owner built homes are "anything goes" other than in the realm of the electrical and plumbing inspectors.

orconn
07-29-10, 02:40 PM
Yeah, those modified quonsets make very practical Arctic living. We had those for married personnel on base (actualy they were located on the old Imperial Navy Air Base near the hangers where the Zeros were kept before they went onto the carriers that fom which they attacked Pearl Harbor) on Hokkaido. Not bad, but didn't allow for alot of pride of ownership, although the "Jones's" were not hard to keep up with!

dkozloski
07-29-10, 02:52 PM
Yeah, those modified quonsets make very practical Arctic living. We had those for married personnel on base (actualy they were located on the old Imperial Navy Air Base near the hangers where the Zeros were kept before they went onto the carriers that fom which they attacked Pearl Harbor) on Hokkaido. Not bad, but didn't allow for alot of pride of ownership, although the "Jones's" were not hard to keep up with!
I haven't seen a Quonset hut for years. Most collapsed from snowload. From time to time you can still see a few "Pacific" huts which were better insulated.

The-Dullahan
07-29-10, 05:21 PM
Is it odd that I want it?

I miss having a well and a septic and no internet...I can always add walls later if I can determine exactly what purpose they supposedly serve.

OffThaHorseCEO
07-29-10, 06:52 PM
Is it odd that I want it?

I miss having a well and a septic and no internet...I can always add walls later if I can determine exactly what purpose they supposedly serve.

i want it so bad. the personalization opportunities are endless and very appealing. BUT, the added hypothetical stress level and cost outwiegh those benefits.

if this wasnt my first home maybe id jump on it. but im in an apartment right now, its in the hood, no garage, dirt/mud driveway and neighbors dont know how to slow down to keep dust down.

i think im gonna pass for good.

someone asked about comparable properties.

theres a 1500 sq foot, 3 br 2 bath with a 1 car garage on .19 acres (thats .19) going for 100k

there are a few places with about .3 acres which are around 2000 sq ft 3 br 2 ba 2 car garage going for about 150k.

the recluse
07-29-10, 07:29 PM
Apparently the sheeple in the lower 48 have let the bureaucrats run right over them and take control of their lives. Around here the people are very protective of personal freedoms.

This from the people that elected Palin as their governor :hide: :tard:

dkozloski
07-30-10, 02:25 AM
This from the people that elected Palin as their governor :hide: :tard:
The sheeple chose Obama.

the recluse
07-30-10, 03:09 PM
The sheeple chose Obama.

Good thing I don't vote...:cool: