: Submarine entertainment



Submariner409
07-06-10, 05:37 PM
Here's a half hour of interesting button pushing - log in and click and drag around the various compartments for a view of why we called these things "sewer pipe" and "pig boat". When you get to the After Torpedo Room scroll right, clockwise, to the forward view of the bolted lower skirt on the after escape hatch. My bunk was the forward top left one - just barely visible. My locker was outboard of the top torpedo - a 2 foot cube. As an Assistant Navigator (Quartermaster) I stood watches in the Conning Tower and Control Room.

To qualify in submarines (earn your dolphins) you had to be able to operate and draw, from memory, every system of every sort in the entire submarine..... ALL of it. One of my qual questions in USS PIPER (SS409) was to line up and light off a 1680 hp 10 cylinder (20 pistons and 2 cranks; figure that one out......) diesel engine - in the dark.

http://www.nonplused.org/panos/uss_pampanito/html/01.html

ga_etc
07-06-10, 06:34 PM
It's cool to be able to look at the inside of a submarine like that. I can't imagine living in such confined quarters with so many other people.

ejguillot
07-06-10, 06:43 PM
Those were very cramped quarters!

Sub, I thank you and those in the sub community for your service. Must be hard to be away from home for months at a time.

Submariner409
07-06-10, 07:06 PM
It was fun and we never did a full day's work. :sneaky:

Nearly impossible to think this takes me back 52 years. Some of those scenes are like yesterday morning. These boats carried a crew of 55 - 65 men, while the new nukes carry 150+. Played a lot of Acey-Deucey on one of those after port mess tables.........

You might be surprised at the number of submariners in CF.............

sub-ma-reee-ner

Sevillian273
07-06-10, 07:33 PM
My grandfather served on the Nautilus, the very first nuclear powered submarine. Unfortunately due to physical distance and his passing I never got to talk with him about it but I did get to tour the sub itself at the museum in Connecticut.

c5 rv
07-06-10, 07:42 PM
What a great site. Thanks!

dkozloski
07-06-10, 09:07 PM
There is nothing in the pictures that can convey the smell.

Submariner409
07-06-10, 09:27 PM
Diesel oil mixed with electrical ozone stink, not human. Considering that over 1/2 of that inner pressure hull was surrounded by external saddle fuel tanks full of good ol' #2 diesel compensated by sea water - one of those boats could steam around the world at 10 knots on the surface..............

dkozloski
07-06-10, 09:55 PM
No showers or almost no showers while on patrol because fresh water is very limited. Everybody does the best they can with a wipedown with rubbing alcohol. Those guys were tough.

codewize
07-07-10, 12:00 AM
Wow, thanks for sharing.

Aron9000
07-07-10, 12:27 AM
No showers or almost no showers while on patrol because fresh water is very limited. Everybody does the best they can with a wipedown with rubbing alcohol. Those guys were tough.

Really??? I thought they would've drawn in salt water for bathing, cleaning, fire suppresion, etc. Just left the fresh water exclusively for drinking and cooking only.

Night Wolf
07-07-10, 01:20 AM
Heh, I've been taking an interest in WWII subs recently. I watched Down Periscope and U-571 again just to see footage of the subs. The diesel-electric is interesting.

Actually that link to the Pampanito, is the sub used in Down Periscope.

The battery technology, or lack of, interests me too, plus the subs just look alot cooler then modern subs IMO. It's pretty amazing how so much of the sub is mechanical.

It's funny tho, in the last week I spent hours reading up and researching this very sub, then it was posted.

u_Mx1kA3irk

dkozloski
07-07-10, 02:15 AM
Really??? I thought they would've drawn in salt water for bathing, cleaning, fire suppresion, etc. Just left the fresh water exclusively for drinking and cooking only.
Space is so limited that when they went on patrol every available space was used for storage including the shower stalls. Taking a shower would include shifting about a ton of stuff to make room and clear the stall.

Aron9000
07-07-10, 03:21 AM
Space is so limited that when they went on patrol every available space was used for storage including the shower stalls. Taking a shower would include shifting about a ton of stuff to make room and clear the stall.

Interesting . . . . .

dkozloski
07-07-10, 03:39 AM
I knew guys who went on patrol in old diesel subs that had been built to handle Regulus cruise missiles before the Polaris boats were available. They said it was no picnic and everybody stank.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSM-N-8_Regulus

hueterm
07-07-10, 08:52 AM
Sub, just curious, how do you pronounce Submariner? SubmarEENer or SubmAIRiner?

c5 rv
07-07-10, 09:59 AM
My brother served two hitches in the Navy in the 60s. He was on the cruiser Providence and then on the diesel electric sub Darter bases in Charleston.

Submariner409
07-07-10, 11:36 AM
Sub-mah-ree-ner

The diesel boats had two 100 GPD electric stills used for making fresh water. Those 2 things with the oval chain guards in the forward end of the Forward Engine Room. They were always scaled up from salt water on the heaters, so efficiency was lousy, and most of the time they were used to double-distill fresh water into battery water: 256 one-ton cells in constant cycling use takes a LOT of fresh water, so batteries came first, cooking/cleanup came second, and humans came last. (You see those orange-red bus bars in the Maneuvering Room cubicle ?? Those are pure copper, all the way to the main battery well disconnects - One of those 128 cell batteries could send an instantaneous discharge rate of over 10,000 Amperes. DC.) We watered batteries every week, and the Electricians were issued dungarees, free, because the acid literally ate your clothes off. Remember that charging a lead-acid battery creates a LOT of hydrogen, which is explosive. The ventilation requirements and battery charging procedures were checked by three separate men with check lists before you ever commenced a battery charge ! Believe it or not, a nuke boat still has a HUGE battery bank, but that's used for emergency reactor startup in case of some sort of failure.

Nuclear boats, with their unlimited power, run two stills constantly - a 10,000 GPD and a 2,000 GPD, so there's no water shortage, but you still don't take hotel showers.

In the Crew's Berthing, After Battery - If you were assigned a lower bunk (deck level) you lived with cases of food, both canned and fresh, until the crew ate its way through enough stores for you to sleep in a whole bunk.

c5 rv - Ask your brother about "Harder, Darter, Trigger & Trout; Three stay in so One goes out......" (Those 4 small attack boats had pancake radial diesel engines that were constantly blowing up, so they scavenged between each other to meet commitments........)

EcSTSatic
07-07-10, 12:42 PM
Cool site!

I admire fellow servicemen who can function under the sea. For me, I'll take my chances above sea level

http://usmcshop.grunt.com/prodimg/BS399.jpg

dkozloski
07-07-10, 02:02 PM
The games people play. The DDG I was on followed the same Russian submarine for 89 days just to show them we could do it. We stopped periodically to take bathermagraph readings and they'd stop and wait for us. One time we got the noisemaker for decoying acoustic torpedoes wrapped around the screws. The Russians surfaced and asked if we needed assistance as we sent divers over the side to clear it. We'd wave at them and they'd wave back.

The bathermograph produced a scribed line on a smoked glass that represented the temperature of the sea vs depth and was used to observe the thermocline. Subs can hide below a sharp change in temperature that deflects sound waves.

EcSTSatic
07-07-10, 02:32 PM
The book, not the movie "Hunt for Red October" was a great read on sub tactics and how they use their environment

Submariner409
07-07-10, 04:25 PM
Every boat has a BT (bathythermograph) for exactly that purpose - the sensor is on the top of the sail and the instrument uses heat sensitive graph paper on a drum which records ocean temp vs. depth. It works, heh, heh, heh........

If you find a 2 or 3 degree cold layer you can come to ALL STOP, trim carefully, and the sub will sit on the cold layer without moving. Good for nice, quiet, long range listening.

Trim ? Overall weight and fore and aft balance. Precise. In a submerged diesel boat running at 3 knots or so, two men walking from the Forward Torpedo Room to the After Torpedo Room will result in a one degree up angle. You can do the same in a 425 foot missile boat - it just takes 8 or so men.

dkozloski
07-07-10, 04:43 PM
Our bathyrmograph looked like a brass torpedo about 2-3 feet long. A smoked glass slide was loaded into it and it was lowered over the side with a little crane on the fantail. As the temp of the water changed as it was dropped it made a scribed line in the smoke on the glass. The glass was loaded into a little gadget that read out the temp vs water depth.

One night the guys dropping it reported that some great big black thing in the water grabbed the bathyrmograph just as they were about to bring it on board and took off with it. The little crane was bent all to hell and they lost several hundred feet of steel cable before it broke.

Jesda
07-07-10, 04:54 PM
Absolutely fascinating stuff!

Submariner409
07-07-10, 05:03 PM
Dave, Those old BT's were really machinists' works of art. The workings were part of the 60's QM3 exam. Aboard R/V RIDGELY WARFIELD we used wimpy electronic modern drop BT's that looked like little bombs with a wire hooked to the tail - instant data as the unit fell.

This is all sort of self-serving, but damn, it was fun................"Where did you go ?" "Out" "What did you do ?" "Nothing".

Here's the 409 in Long Island Sound in 1961, running on 2 (of 4) main engines............I'm down in the conning tower. Click to enlarge..............

dkozloski
07-07-10, 06:27 PM
I never had much contact with the guys in operations or anti-sub. They were on the other end of the ship. I stood some in-port watches on their equipment when they were working on it while tied to the pier. I would be stationed in the passageway outside the ASROC control room with a 12 ga. shotgun. My orders were, "Shoot anybody that comes through that door, it doesn't matter who it is." That seemed pretty clear to me. It always impressed me how simple and succinct everything seemed to get when nuclear weapons were involved. There was never any doubt about intent or purpose.

I thought that the truest indication of where the real trust and authority was placed was that the ships armory was immediately behind the 2nd Division berthing compartment and nobody was going to get to it without going through us and the duty gunner had the key. The BM and QM were high on the succession to command list but the GMs had the guns.

EChas3
07-07-10, 10:37 PM
Clear the Bridge by Richard H. O'Kane is the story of the USS Tang. As a sub nut, I really enjoyed it. It may not be the best of literary style but it is an outstanding story.

Chicago has the U-505 captured by Ed Beach at the Museum of Science and Industry and the Cobia is less than three hours North in Manitowoc WI. Kids groups periodically get to overnight aboard it. The Silversides is on the other side of Lake Michigan in Muskegon, MI.

A lot of us haven't forgotten the silent service. The Pacific war might have been lost without those brave men.

Ranger
07-07-10, 11:17 PM
It's been a LONG tine since I've been in the U505, but even as a kid I remember it being VERY cramped. Not my cup of tee. I preferred taking my chances on the ground, but you guys probably ate better.

Aron9000
07-08-10, 02:34 AM
^ About that, how did they decide who became the cooks on a submarine???

dkozloski
07-08-10, 02:55 AM
^ About that, how did they decide who became the cooks on a submarine???
Being a cook in the Navy is a specific job that you go to school and train for. That being said, everybody in the silent service is a sub sailor and sub school graduate first and whatever their rate is second just like every Marine is a rifleman even if he can't do anything else.

Submariner409
07-08-10, 08:17 AM
Let's see if I can shake the gray matter.....

In PIPER we carried Torpedomen, IC Electricians, Main Power Electricians, Stewards, Radiomen, Quartermasters/Signalmen, Sonarmen, Electronics Technicians, Commissarymen, Machinists Mates, Enginemen, a Hospital Corpsman, a Yeoman, Firemen (Engineering rate strikers) and Seamen (Deck rate strikers). Captain, Exec, Navigator, Engineer, Gun Boss (Weapons Officer), Communications Officer, Ass't. Eng. (Electrical Officer), a couple of Lt's, LtJg's, and an Ensign...... maybe 8 Chiefs in different rates.

When the entire crew was qualified to man all the watch stations you were in 3-section watches underway: 4 hours on, 8 off. If you didn't have enough qualified watchstanders you stood 4 0n, 4 Off - so it behooved one to train a man quickly. If you couldn't handle the load, you were transferred off the boat upon return to port. Very simple: Pull your share or you're toast. No recourse. Gone. If anyone cheated, lied, or stole (and was caught) he was wrapped in several blankets and taught how to "walk" through the length of the boat while being beaten senseless in each compartment by the crew. Look up "blanket party". Plenty blankets: no bruises. No more problem.

Nuclear boats generally stand 6 on and 12 off (6 and 6 until all watch stations are filled) and the key watches stand 6 and 18.

Find the book Thunder Below by Adm Gene Fluckey. USS BARB was the only U.S. unit to land troops on Japanese soil during hostilities: His crew took the scuttling explosive charges out of the sub, sneaked ashore in a rubber boat and blew up a train ! Then the boat had to outrun the Japs, on the surface, to deep water. Good read. Gene was a member of the SubVets Chesapeake Base and my uncle, W.R. Boose, III (Wild Bill) served with him in WW-II. Bill was responsible for me going into subs. He died an alcoholic retired Commander - the War did him in.

EcSTSatic
07-08-10, 10:18 AM
Being a cook in the Navy is a specific job that you go to school and train for. That being said, everybody in the silent service is a sub sailor and sub school graduate first and whatever their rate is second just like every Marine is a rifleman even if he can't do anything else.

Exactly. We got intense marksmanship training regardless of our MOS. I still love the feel of an M14 even though we evolved to the M16

Carvone
07-08-10, 04:22 PM
I toured this sub when I was stationed at Moffett field in Santa Clara California, this site shows much more than they show you on the tour, like most museums they rope off most of the good stuff. Patriots point in Charleston has some nice ships to tour, the USS Clamagore (which was built a Balao-class) is a fine example. I remember touring the one in Chicago at the museum when I was a little kid and thinking it was the neatest thing. I almost went subs but being 6'2" I thought I would bang my head too much.:)

Submariner409
07-08-10, 04:42 PM
I'm 6' 2.5" and had to get a height waiver. My skull has the nicks and scars to prove it.

dkozloski
07-08-10, 06:53 PM
Surface ships are a different kettle of fish. Height is not a problem but when you're walkng down a passageway on a tin can taking 55 degree rolls you find yourself walking on the bulkheads instead of the deck. Your shoulders are taking hits from every sharp cornered bracket in sight and if you fall downhill you may go four or five feet before you hit bottom. I saw guys break bones. I prefer my world to be stationary.

Submariner409
07-09-10, 09:25 AM
Dave & LS1Mike, You wanna hear Navy "small world" ???

The volume tank for the well pump crapped out yesterday. Called a local, Jim Slater (Well & Pump) to take a look. 0800 this morning he fixes the system (new volume tank).

Writes out the bill, looks at the truck and says "Where did you get the SubVets license plate?" So I explain about the local Base and how US SubVets is gradually replacing the WW-II SubVets as they die off. He says "I was an Electrician in REQUIN in New London in 58, 59 and 60." I look him in the eye and say "Dirt ?" He looks like you could knock him over with a feather! We knew each other, 50 years ago in another world. His nickname was "Dirt" Slater: the PIPER crew used to play against REQUIN in beer ball games on weekends. He was always on his face, in the dirt, sliding for a base. I just signed up a new SubVets member.

Submariner409
07-14-10, 10:00 AM
Just got an e-mail from a CF member in Connecticut - he served in a couple of the same boats as me, but at different times........again, small world. He's a member of SubVets and we keep a pretty good roster of addresses, so he put 2+2 together and called a few guys in MD.