: Spark Plugs and Fuel filter



veloce
07-01-10, 03:53 PM
Well its time to change my spark plugs. It looks simple. Just remove strut bar and engine cover and access hould be easy. True or not? Any tips or tricks for plugs and fuel filter? Thanks Jeff

Twitch
07-01-10, 04:08 PM
Just did my plugs. Remove the coil packs and deff get a good boot pulling tool. Even with the tool, I still needed to use my channel locks on a couple boots. I didn't do it, but pulling out the battery should give you more room also. A pair of mechanic gloves came in very handy for me, although some places were too tight for them.

Tony

814V
07-01-10, 04:49 PM
I am getting ready to do plugs as well. What plugs are you guys going with?

Twitch
07-02-10, 08:19 AM
I went with NGK TR6, but TR55 is good for N/A.
BTW the stock plugs looked perfect at 38K miles.

perfect
07-02-10, 09:09 AM
How are you going to change your fuel filter? I've read that it's fairly difficult on the V's but I've never done it myself.

Also, how do you know to change it?

AG'S-V
07-02-10, 12:53 PM
Back the rear end up on ramps, loosen nuts at both ends of the filter (can't remember wrench size) and watch for spray, install new filter, tighten, cycle ignition to prime the system, ????, PROFIT.

I went with the GM plugs...mine also looked damn good at 50k miles.

814V
07-02-10, 01:03 PM
My car has 75,000 miles on it but had a crate motor put in under warranty at 39,000 miles. I would assume they would have put new plugs in with the new motor but I have no idea.

CancerJCC
07-02-10, 05:58 PM
Back the rear end up on ramps, loosen nuts at both ends of the filter (can't remember wrench size) and watch for spray, install new filter, tighten, cycle ignition to prime the system, ????, PROFIT.

I went with the GM plugs...mine also looked damn good at 50k miles.

OP might want to look first as mine has clips but my standard "clip release wrench" doesn't fit. I can't explain but I put in two many hours and ended up leaving it as is...

AG'S-V
07-03-10, 08:40 PM
Yeah, my bad...forgot about that ;)

Get a fuel/ac line quick release kit from your auto parts store to release one end, the other has a nut...I think there's also a clamp holding it down.

It's really simple...just take your time, the quick release take some finesse, but once you do it a few times it's not that bad.

As for the plugs...unless you have the hands of a 9 YO child, remove the coil packs and engine cover.

MauiV
07-03-10, 11:37 PM
I installed a Maggie the last time I changed plugs. Figured what the hell, the hoods open.

ewill3rd
07-05-10, 07:07 AM
Some of the GM filters have a low clearance quick release fitting.
It can be a real challenge to get most tools in the space provided.
I have known some guys that bought cheap tools and modified them to fit.
I got some pliers from Snap on that fit quite nicely. There are two sizes in the tools but I usually use the same tool for both fittings.
Good idea to relieve the fuel pressure before taking the filter off.
We had a guy out in CA burn his eardrum from fuel spray and I have gotten it in the eyes a few times.

CancerJCC
07-05-10, 09:06 PM
I installed a Maggie the last time I changed plugs. Figured what the hell, the hoods open.

WIN!


Some of the GM filters have a low clearance quick release fitting.
It can be a real challenge to get most tools in the space provided.
I have known some guys that bought cheap tools and modified them to fit.


Exactly what I was saying just didn't know how to explain it so well. But ya I tried all kinds of crap and I finally just said screw it.

kevm14
08-07-10, 01:13 PM
If the quick release fittings are anything like what I am used to on GMs (on fuel filters) then you just twist the fitting to loosen it up, pull the slack and push the line TOWARD the filter, then release the clips with your fingers. The line usually slides right off. I've never had to use a tool.

JNR
08-07-10, 02:42 PM
I changed my fuel filter a couple weeks ago and was extremely easy, although I suggest picking up a fuel line disconnect tool...you'll need 5/16" and 3/8"; lisle (still made in usa) makes a set of plastic angled tools for around $17 at sears and they work well. You'll also need 21 and 17 mm wrenches (don't quote me on those numbers, I don't recall sizes 100% :) )

I didn't even need to raise the car and the filter is right there in front of the rear wheel....First, relive fuel pressure via shrader valve on fuel rail (on driver's side in front); remove small (10 mm head, iirc) bolt holding the bracket/filter on the "frame" and that'll allow the assembly to come down a little...Take your two wrenches and the larger one goes on the filter and the smaller one on the tubing nut...hold the larger one to keep filter from twisting and loosen nut with smaller wrench. Fuel will leak out, but shouldn't spray if you relieved pressure...Still, use your head when working with gas...

Now, there is flex lines on the filter, so that you can pull the filter down for better access (still be careful though, to not strain the lines). Put your tool in, press up and pull the fuel line off...the one closer to the body of the filter is a little harder to get in, but I used some pliers to put some leverage on the tool to pop into the clip...

Put new filter on, reverse procedue, although I found it easier to put the hardline/nut part on first; the flex quick fittings just snap on. Tighten bracket nut and you're done...Probably one of the easiest ones I've ever done :)

Here's the Lisle Tool Set (http://www.usatoolwarehouse.com/usatoolwarehouse/LIS-39400.html)...Other styles work, but whatver you use, do yourself a favor and stay away from the chinese junk they sell at the auto parts stores now!