: Post your CF.com computing machine!



drewsdeville
06-28-10, 12:25 PM
What are you using to stay updated on CF.com?

I'm using a 2 year old HP Pavilion dv2911us (14", Core 2 Duo, 3GB DDR2, 250GB hard drive to be replaced by a SSD soon, dual booting Windows 7 Professional 64bit and Linux Ubuntu 10.04.

orconn
06-28-10, 12:42 PM
^^^ Congratulations!

gary88
06-28-10, 12:49 PM
15" 2.4GHz MacBook Pro. Bought it nearly two years ago and haven't had a single problem with it.

http://img641.imageshack.us/img641/663/d9318124.jpg

iowasevillests
06-28-10, 01:17 PM
While at work its a 2 week old HP Elitebook8540W i5 core, 4GB RAM, Win7 laptop driving 2 additional monitors, while at home its a 4 year old cheap HP laptop I bought while in college for carrying around to class and typing notes(surfing the net in reality)

MacMuse
06-28-10, 05:34 PM
An Apple iPad of course...

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b215/MacMuse/CAR/cbc000c4.jpg

With Atomic Web for the browser. It supports changing the browser ID so this site treats me like a full desktop browser instead of a mobile browser.

Jesda
06-28-10, 05:43 PM
This generic box of parts, running Mac OS X 10.5

http://www.q45.org/cpg/albums/userpics/10001/normal_100_7340.jpg

http://www.q45.org/cpg/albums/userpics/10001/normal_100_7339.jpg

I have a dust problem.

JimmyH
06-28-10, 08:27 PM
^hackintosh :nono:

here is my over-priced netbook:

http://www.cooleywire.com/jimmyh/pics/comp/alien6.jpg

Submariner409
06-28-10, 09:13 PM
6 year old generic mid-tower running XP Pro (SP3) with 120G drive, some ancient Intel processor, a G of RAM, a new Radeon card, floppy, new power supply, DVD, CD-RW, old HP DeskJet 600 and 1210, Kodak Printer dock, some USB ports and lots of prayers. DSL and a Linksys router/wi-fi covers the house/property. A handful of 8G flash drives.

THIS old Toshiba laptop is due for the scrap heap - but it works faithfully.

A 26" CRT GE TV on a digital box from directional analog antenna - but we NEVER watch TV or movies - NEVER. (Well, maybe the PGA and the Redskins.)

Tube stereo with MartinLogan electrostatic speakers. It's on now..............

Kev
06-28-10, 09:31 PM
A PC, always a PC.

gdwriter
06-28-10, 09:32 PM
My home office with my three-year-old 2.2 GHz MacBook Pro. The second monitor is handy for having both my saved grading comments and students' assignments visible, as well as for going back and forth between Dreamweaver and Firefox when I'm working on my freelance e-mails.

http://www.gdwriter.com/IMG_2103.jpg

http://www.gdwriter.com/IMG_2105.jpg

JimmyH
06-29-10, 02:14 PM
and here is my workstation, a little overkill for browsing forums, but I can see alot more :D

http://www.cooleywire.com/jimmyh/pics/comp/xps420.jpg

Stingroo
06-29-10, 02:22 PM
Do I spy a Camaro mouse there Jimmy?

JimmyH
06-29-10, 02:24 PM
haha, no, it's a Bumblebee toy :D

Stingroo
06-29-10, 02:34 PM
Oh. I really want the Z06 wireless mouse. :hide:

Sevillian273
06-29-10, 04:27 PM
ASUS Motherboard / AMD 3.3Ghz Triple-core processor / Crucial Ballistix 2gb DDR3 1600mhz RAM / HIS Radeon 4850 1GB graphics card / WD Caviar Black 640gig Hard drive. All on a 13 year old 21inch CRT monitor! My monitor weighs 88 pounds. :eek:

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m280/merc892003/100_0872.jpg

drewsdeville
06-29-10, 04:33 PM
ASUS Motherboard / AMD 3.3Ghz Triple-core processor / Crucial Ballistix 2gb DDR3 1600mhz RAM / HIS Radeon 4850 1GB graphics card / WD Caviar Black 640gig Hard drive. All on a 13 year old 21inch CRT monitor! My monitor weighs 88 pounds. :eek:

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m280/merc892003/100_0872.jpg

Wow, nearly identical hardware to the rig I sold over the winter. The only exceptions were ADATA brand memory and a HD4870.

Gotta get yourself some SATA opticals and get rid of them nasty old IDE cables. Nice looking rig though. I always thought those acrylic cases were interesting but always opted for a more "business" look. Did you experience any of the screw stripping horrors that I've read about when putting it together or is it just that people overdo it when tightening everything up? And is that the subwoofer to a Logitech sound system I see?

The Tony Show
06-29-10, 04:38 PM
5 year old Gateway POS laptop with an AMD Turion64 and 1 gig of RAM. Runs like a champ and won't die.

iowasevillests
06-29-10, 04:58 PM
While at work its a 2 week old HP Elitebook8540W i5 core, 4GB RAM, Win7 laptop driving 2 additional monitors, while at home its a 4 year old cheap HP laptop I bought while in college for carrying around to class and typing notes(surfing the net in reality)

Here is a crappy cell phone pic of the work rig

Sevillian273
06-29-10, 05:37 PM
Wow, nearly identical hardware to the rig I sold over the winter. The only exceptions were ADATA brand memory and a HD4870.

Gotta get yourself some SATA opticals and get rid of them nasty old IDE cables. Nice looking rig though. I always thought those acrylic cases were interesting but always opted for a more "business" look. Did you experience any of the screw stripping horrors that I've read about when putting it together or is it just that people overdo it when tightening everything up? And is that the subwoofer to a Logitech sound system I see?

I didnt have any problems putting the case together. All of the threaded holes have metal inserts and the case is mostly built with thumb screws. Got tired of the same old form factor and went for something different this time. The case is 'Sunbeam' brand. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811166042&cm_re=sunbeam_ufo-_-11-166-042-_-Product Yeah thats a logitech x530 mini sub...

ga_etc
06-29-10, 06:11 PM
http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv220/austin99etc/0629101750.jpg

HP Pavilion dv4 running Windows Vista Home Premium 64 bit. AMD Turion X2 Dual-Core processor 2.10GHz, 250GB hard drive, and 4GB of RAM. It's about at year and a half old now and my only complaint is that the battery has gotten so bad it has to remain plugged in. Other than that it has performed pretty well for me. The Altec Lansing speakers sound good and are loud for a laptop and the ATI Radeon HD 3200 Graphics card is awesome.

Stingroo
06-29-10, 07:31 PM
I have a Dell Studio 1536 which I upgraded to Windows 7 (gotta love that $29.99 price tag for students :thumbsup:) I bought it refurbished for $600. 4gb RAM, 320GB harddrive, ATI Raedon 3200HD graphics (which I never use for anything... never did get into PC gaming lol).

I like my laptop, but like Austin the battery life is starting to suffer (I've owned it for a year). I can usually get 2 hours out of it, 2 and a half if I'm gentle.

Here's a pic on my messy dorm desk. :)
http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/5994/1118161702.jpg

Notice all the essentials there... Xbox 360 controller, bottled water, headphones, other mess, train ticket home and other information taped to the wall... surge protector duct taped to the dresser for optimum placement. Yeah. We were livin' large. lol

ga_etc
06-29-10, 07:39 PM
At least you can run for two hours unplugged. I'm lucky if I get 15 mins.

JimmyH
06-29-10, 10:26 PM
ASUS Motherboard / AMD 3.3Ghz Triple-core processor / Crucial Ballistix 2gb DDR3 1600mhz RAM / HIS Radeon 4850 1GB graphics card / WD Caviar Black 640gig Hard drive. All on a 13 year old 21inch CRT monitor! My monitor weighs 88 pounds. :eek:

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m280/merc892003/100_0872.jpg



where is the flux capacitor?

JimmyH
06-29-10, 10:31 PM
I have a Dell Studio 1536 which I upgraded to Windows 7 (gotta love that $29.99 price tag for students :thumbsup:) I bought it refurbished for $600. 4gb RAM, 320GB harddrive, ATI Raedon 3200HD graphics (which I never use for anything... never did get into PC gaming lol).

I like my laptop, but like Austin the battery life is starting to suffer (I've owned it for a year). I can usually get 2 hours out of it, 2 and a half if I'm gentle.

Here's a pic on my messy dorm desk. :)

Notice all the essentials there... Xbox 360 controller, bottled water, headphones, other mess, train ticket home and other information taped to the wall... surge protector duct taped to the dresser for optimum placement. Yeah. We were livin' large. lol



the studio is a great laptop. One of Dell's finest machines to date. My wife has a 1555, i had one too, but I wanted an Alienware so I sold it.

I dont know about the 1536, but the 1555 has incredible speakers for a laptop. I could actually play music on it, and it sounded good. It has a built in subwoofer. I was getting about 3 hours on battery when I used the battery life tools.

I am getting about 4-5 hours with the M11x I have now. Using it intermittently, I can go two days before I have to plug it in.

Stingroo
06-29-10, 10:37 PM
Mine doesn't have the subwoofer. My friend has the Studio XPS with it, and I agree, it is great.

My 1536 has given me some fit and finish issues, but I guess I'm not the kindest person in the world to this poor laptop (it lives in a backpack, etc.) I've had the palm rest replaced once, the back of the case replaced (and they didn't have any black ones, so they gave me a blue one for free. WIN), and I HATE HATE HATE the stupid light bar thing for media controls. It's been replaced three times. (Once because I actually broke it).

Oh, and I broke the keyboard when I dropped a speaker on the laptop in the dorm when I was hooking up my surround sound, and they replaced that too. :lol:

It lives the college life. If I didn't have the in-home service plan (which I paid a LOT for -.-) I would hate this thing, 2 week turn around time for depot repairs is unacceptable. But I guess I got my $200 worth.

JimmyH
06-29-10, 10:41 PM
The trim is not the sturdiest, i agree. I bought mine refurbished too. The dvd drive only wanted to read every other dvd, so instead of trying to get replaced by dell, I just bought one on ebay for $20. I broke several tabs getting the keyboard bezel off to replace it. And I had to stick a piece of thick tape under one part of the keyboard to fix a flex issue. Other than that, a stout machine. And whisper quiet. Even running games the fan never went into high speed. Wifi connection was very fast too, but I did put the upgraded Intel adapter in.

Stingroo
06-29-10, 10:47 PM
Oh yeah! And I've replaced the STUPID slot drive once too, it kept spitting out discs when the computer was turned on (it still does, the techs have no idea). I'm not sure about my wifi adapter, but like I said it lives on a college campus with campus-wide wifi, so I always have full signal.


I like it though, I really do. I would loooove a new XPS laptop. :drool:

I~LUV~Caddys8792
06-29-10, 11:36 PM
18 month old 13" Macbook in stainless steel. 2ghz Intel Core 2 Duo, 3mb of ram, 2gb of memory. Have had NO problems with it whatsoever. Really turned me onto Macintosh.

drewsdeville
06-30-10, 12:22 AM
3mb of ram, 2gb of memory.

That has to be a typo. My graphing calculator has more than 3mb of ram and 2gb of memory won't even hold a modern operating system. :confused:

greencadillacmatt
06-30-10, 03:18 AM
http://i404.photobucket.com/albums/pp126/greencadillacmatt/BunchaStuff051.jpg
http://i404.photobucket.com/albums/pp126/greencadillacmatt/BunchaStuff052.jpg

My 2.5 year old Sony Vaio. It has a 141GB Hard Drive and 2GB of Ram. It does everything that I need it to do, which is mostly college stuff and cruise the web. I love my laptop. :thumbsup:

ewill3rd
06-30-10, 08:05 AM
At work I have a 2.4 GHz P4 with 2 GB of RAM and 2 hard drives on a 21" widescreen display.

Most of my stuff at home is custom built by me.
I have to Raidmax cases with blue trim and LED's. Both are close to identical save for some hardware changes, one has a gigabyte mobo and the other is an MSI.
one has a 2.8-ish GHz core 2 duo and the other is a 3.0 GHz.
Both have Terabyte storage, 4GB of RAM but I goofed and got 32 bit Win7 Premium so I know some of the RAM is unused.
One has a 23" widescreen and one has my new 32" flat panel LCD TV as an HDMI source and I use it for my entertainment hub in the master bedroom.
I could do CF on it but it is too hard to read from the bed... :lol:
Both are fabulous machines and much more reliable and fixable than any of the proprietary crap I have bought from Dell or HP over the years.
My son's 3.0 P4 Dell that we bought from my wife's work had a hard drive crash which will cause me major grief since my son had hundreds of games on it that he will probably have to start over once I get it running again.
All my custom builds are still running and I have 8 computers in the house, at work I have one that I bought and access to 3 more nice machines that work great.
As stated though I only do CF on 2 of them.

drewsdeville
06-30-10, 09:37 AM
Windows keys aren't 23 or 64 bit specific. You can take that 32-bit version that you got on accident and switch it over to 64bit no problem...it will still activate.

If you need a disc you can always torrent them or go here:

http://forum.notebookreview.com/microsoft-windows-7/428068-legal-windows-7-download-links-just-like-vista-before.html

ewill3rd
06-30-10, 09:47 PM
I'm good for now, I am actually concerned about some device drivers for stuff I use and some GM apps that I use sometimes at home.
It might be non-issues but I just got it all working the way I want so no changes for me right now.
I'll get a snap of one of the machines I built and post it but they both look the same on the outside.

Here's the box:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y161/ewill3rd/SAM_0129.jpg

Here is the armoir with the 32" screen and you can see the wireless keyboard and mouse that work from the comfort of my bed for netflixing!
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y161/ewill3rd/SAM_0128.jpg

Sevillian273
06-30-10, 10:51 PM
That raidmax tornado is a great budget case for the price. So is the smilodon but it costs a bit more.

themadwacker1
07-01-10, 03:20 AM
Here's mine.....got it for free! :suspect:

http://i788.photobucket.com/albums/yy162/themadwacker_1/Just%20pics/Copyofoldcomputer-1.jpg

Jesda
07-01-10, 03:55 AM
One of the first flat CRTs!

ewill3rd
07-01-10, 06:42 AM
Sevillian, I bought two of them, the second one I got even cheaper since they were selling out of them.
I think I paid about $40 for each. When I built these two I went from opening the boxes to finishing out the Windows install in less than 2 hours.
It used to take me the better part of a day or even longer to put one together and load it up.
I love the 32" Vizio with this thing using HDMI. As you can see I have an audio issue, but the old Altec Lansing 2.1 I have sounds better than the TV speakers anyway. It is pretty nice for the bedroom. I built something similar for a girl that used to be my helper. She has a 5.1 though and she pisses her neighbors off regularly.
Hers and my 3.0 are about the same really but I have a slightly better video card and a different case.
I build all my own systems. As I said earlier all the stuff I build is faster, easier to work with, and lasts longer than the crap I have from Dell and HP.
One reason I haven't bought a laptop is because I can't build one myself (easily).
That and I hate them... :lol:
The fact that they are so fragile and cost 2-3 times as much as a comparable PC just make me not even want one.

My wife has a Toshiba tablet and although I would call it decent, it was outdated before it got here in the mail.

Stingroo
07-01-10, 08:34 AM
Here's mine.....got it for free! :suspect:

http://i788.photobucket.com/albums/yy162/themadwacker_1/Just%20pics/Copyofoldcomputer-1.jpg

Oh my god we had one of these in my house when I was a kid. It was cooooool :lol:

eXile
07-01-10, 12:39 PM
http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f46/XcoNFLicT/IMAG0019.jpg

AMD Hexacore OC'd ~4.0 GHz
2 Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB HD running at 7200 RPMs
Logitech G15 Keyboard and Logitech G9 Mouse
Asus Rampage II Extreme
2 nVidia 295 GTX's SLI'd
1000w Ultra modular power supply
Samsung 22" HDTV/monitor and the CRT has since been replaced with a 22" Samsung LED Backlit monitor
Fatality Sound Card
Altec Lansing 7:1 surround sound system
and some random hundred dollar blu ray drive by LG.

4 Operating Systems to choose from on boot too :)
-Windows 7
-Windows XP
-Ubuntu
-Mac OSX (hackintosh)

Oh and I just picked up this little netbook
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=6089804&CatId=2814
Its essentially a iPad but with windows... oh and it has a hard keyboard not a on screen one :)

Stingroo
07-01-10, 12:46 PM
^ Dude I think I just found out what I'm buying next year. I like that netbook a LOT.

eXile
07-01-10, 01:35 PM
its really an awesome little netbook... asus ftw!

codewize
07-01-10, 02:04 PM
I use a 5 year old Pentium D 3.4 GHz, 4 GB of Crucial DDR2 RAM, 500GB Caviar Black HDD, on a Supermicro PDSGE main board with a MSI nVidia 6600LE graphics card.

I realized last week that my PC will be 5 years old in a couple months. Therefore this will all be replaced soon.

ewill3rd
07-02-10, 08:26 AM
My 'puter at work is an HP a650y P4 2.4GHz and I just upped it to 2GB of RAM.
It works fine for what I use it for.
I had to replace the video card but otherwise it ha worked fine.
Some good looking rigs on here!

Next time this one needs an update, it is gone.
Not sure what I'll do with it, maybe something will die at home and I can take it and use it for something?
I really have too many computers actually.
I think I have 8 in the house and easy access to 4 that only I use at work.

CIWS
07-02-10, 09:12 AM
Main PC here at home is an Intel i7 860 @ 3.3 gigahz, 8 GB RAM, Win 7 64, Nvidia GTX 295 and GT 240, 2.5 TB of HD space, Blu-ray ROM drive and CDRW drive. Three displays, one 22" Samsung and two Envision 19" on each side. All of that run off of an Antec 1000watt supply.

I still have 4 other desktops and two laptops in case I lose the main one.

codewize
07-02-10, 01:38 PM
Very nostalgic. I love it. I wish I hung on to all the stuff I had over the years.


Here's mine.....got it for free! :suspect:

http://i788.photobucket.com/albums/yy162/themadwacker_1/Just%20pics/Copyofoldcomputer-1.jpg

JimmyH
07-02-10, 02:57 PM
I build all my own systems. As I said earlier all the stuff I build is faster, easier to work with, and lasts longer than the crap I have from Dell and HP.

I have to disagree with you there. Between home and office, I have over a dozen Dell's. I keep giving away the old ones because they never die. I have one here I hang onto for nostalgia that has a windows 95 sticker on it :D I have had three computers crap out on me in the last 5 years or so. Two of them were home-made. One was a Dell (but I have to allow at least one out of 30+ Dells I have bought over the years)

You forget that they can build the same computer you can for half the price. And they hammer out all the driver incompatibilities that you or I would have to do ourselves.

drewsdeville
07-02-10, 03:22 PM
You forget that they can build the same computer you can for half the price. And they hammer out all the driver incompatibilities that you or I would have to do ourselves.


I agree with this and retail pricing is even starting to reflect this. Last winter, I sold the desktop I built for extra cash because I didn't really use it anymore. Since then I've been scanning the market, looking at whats out there. There's no way I could build some of these quad core, 8gb machines for what I can get them from HP, Dell, Acer, etc. Some exceptions do apply, like if you go for the "gaming" machines where you tend to get screwed on a mediocre video card for $1000 more.

If I do ever plan to return to the desktop scene, I'm considering buying retail, dumping a video card in it and calling it a day.

You can even usually successfully flash the BIOS with the board manufacturer's (Asus, Foxconn, etc.) to remove the proprietary BIOS , unlocking all potential

JimmyH
07-02-10, 03:30 PM
The only problem with Dell, from an upgrade standpoint, is the fact that they are clinging to the BTX form factor. You cannot use their chassis for mass market mobos because nobody does BTX. ATX is the accepted standard. The problem is that if your mobo dies and you are out of warranty, Dell is going to bitch-slap you $200-300 for an obsolete mainboard, when you can get a cutting edge retail ATX mainboard for half that. I recently bought a monstrous Dell XPS chassis with a 1200W power supply for $200 because it's mobo was fried. I had to cut apart and rearrange the mobo tray so I could install an ATX. But it was worth it because you cannot even get a 1000W supply for $200, to say nothing of a full tower chassis.

Kev
07-02-10, 03:38 PM
Yeah, I hate gettin bitch-slapped, makes me angry.

JimmyH
07-02-10, 07:23 PM
it's especially bad when you have to pay for the privilege :D

ewill3rd
07-02-10, 07:57 PM
That fact alone is what makes me do my own builds.
Years ago you could build them a lot cheaper then you could buy them. I'll concede that these days it is the other way around.
I believe that they keep the cost down by buying bulk junk parts.
I can get a good reliable motherboard for a fair price and build whatever I want on it.
Sure I lose a hard disc or a power supply now and then but a trip to microcenter and fifty bucks later I am back up and running.
Would I rather wait a week or two and argue with Dell tech support to get what I want or pay 5 times what something is worth from an OEM?
Um... no.
I'd still rather spend more money to know what I am getting and be able to fix it with a trip down the road.
Yeah I know I am spoiled with a microcenter right down the street. :D

Sevillian273
07-02-10, 08:19 PM
Even better would be to live within a day's shipping distance from a newegg distribution center!

For me, picking the parts, putting them all together, and setting up the computer exactly the way I want it is worth the trouble even if it does command a price premium which, to date I have not had to pay. The core components of my system (excluding the flashy case which isnt necessary) costed roughly 600 bucks. I think anyone would be hard pressed to find an OEM that matches its performance for the price. With the proper research, parts selection, and smart shopping you can squeeze out alot of performance for the price however I realize most people dont want to go through all of that. I probably spent about 24 hours researching parts, reading reviews, construction, and setting up software but as an enthusiast I thoroughly enjoyed the ride.

ewill3rd
07-02-10, 08:58 PM
Bear in mind my first proprietary PC was a packard bell that cost $1,600!
It was a boat anchor even when it was new, not to mention the class action lawsuit for using used parts and selling them as new.
From there I had a place in St. Louis build my next one and the custom built machine was so much better even though it was a 3.11 machine and as a result not much better than the previous turd I had. :lol:
Every once in a while I opt for a pre-fab system and I always seem to be disappointed. Dollar for dollar I enjoy my builds much better than a manufactured POS.

I get a great degree of satisfaction out of doing the research, picking the parts, and watching it all come together before my eyes too.
That is probably my biggest drive.
Also one thing I can't stand about retail systems is all the "extra crap" software you get.
I don't need any of it and it just clutters things up. Not to mention the wasted space with the extra partition and backup files I don't need.

I mean I believe to each his own, but for me, I wanna build.
I think my last 2 systems ran about $900 and I am sure dollar for dollar they outperform what I would have paid retail for something comparable.

drewsdeville
07-02-10, 10:39 PM
Yeah, like I mentioned earlier, when you go towards the high end of the spectrum, the gap closes quick. However, my days of building beastly overkill desktops are pretty much over. I've been pricing out some more mild machines, with a focus on energy efficiency and quietness as I've started dedicating my desktops as media centers. I'm now looking for something that I don't feel conscious or bad about leaving on 24/7 while it's in use or downloading.

I think in the end, the thing that really attracts me to buying retail vs building is the fact that a valid Windows OS comes with the retail automatically. That always adds $100 to any of my builds, unless I want to reuse some of my old XP keys, which I'm not willing to do... When I price out hardware, the gap isn't quite as large, but tacking on that Windows OS always puts it over the top. Yeah, I could finally make the complete switch to Linux, but I still play a game every now and then. That puts the kibosh on that idea, at least until emulation such as WINE makes more progress.

And, as far as retail component quality, the retials aren't all that bad. I just reformatted a customers Dell Vostro 200 last weekend. It came packed with a nicely featured micro-atx Foxconn board and a decent-for-the-day Western Digital drive.

Along the same lines, I also repaired a HP recently that actually came with an Asus motherboard (yes, ASUS!). I was quite surprised. It had HP's part number sticker on it, but it was indeed an Asus model. No doubt that if it was my own computer, I would have been able to run to Asus' site and flash the bios to get a fully functioning board as if I purchased it on "The Egg"

codewize
07-03-10, 12:25 AM
ewill, I agree with you 1000%. Dell couldn't make a decent PC if they had to.

Building your own PC is definitely not cheaper anymore but it's still and always will be a better solution. If you know the hardware and choose quality parts you'll end up with a better system than anyone can sell you. The best part is, when you install the OS it won't be pre boogered up with crappy useless software.

Although I sell them all day long, I would never use an off the shelf computer from any manufacturer, but Dell is definitely the worst and least reliable. I sell 2 things, if you want a decent business class computer, you get an Acer Veriton. If you want reliable uptime and money is no issue, you get an IBM.

CIWS
07-03-10, 09:15 AM
Building your own PC is definitely not cheaper anymore but it's still and always will be a better solution. If you know the hardware and choose quality parts you'll end up with a better system than anyone can sell you. The best part is, when you install the OS it won't be pre boogered up with crappy useless software.

Cost is still about the same, building vs buying, as long as one compares apples to apples. These really cheap pre-builts are built with really cheap parts. I could also build some little micro-atx based computer with a low end CPU and Pwr supply barely big enough to run it, but why ? Overall one can built a decent desktop for 700-800.00 (or less) that will do what most folks need done.

ewill3rd
07-03-10, 09:35 AM
Now I feel like I need to build another one :lol:
Too bad I'm broke right now.

Sevillian273
07-03-10, 11:19 AM
Now I feel like I need to build another one :lol:
Too bad I'm broke right now.

That's what the newegg 'wish list' feature is for!

codewize
07-03-10, 11:57 AM
I have a client who all but forces me to but crap from Newegg and every time we've purchased something from there it was either damaged out of the box, didn't work correctly or failed within the first month of use.

As far as I can tell Newegg sells damaged, returned or second run items.

Sevillian273
07-03-10, 12:18 PM
1. I've bought over a grand in parts from them in the last 2 years and have never had an issue.
2. I've never found one single item that I was looking for at a lower price than the egg.
3. I've never received any order from the internet in less time than newegg. Half of my orders arrive a day earlier than the UPS's 'estimated delivery' date.

That's good enough for me.

ewill3rd
07-03-10, 12:31 PM
I hate to agree with code on that one because I really like newegg, however...

I have to confess I have gotten a lot of bad merchandise from them. Look at the reviews on their site.
I had to do an RMA on a mobo I bought from them 4 times, the last time I sent the final one to MSI, they sent back the same one but it worked perfectly.
In fact I am using it in my second recent build.
They are good about handling it, but it gets old... and fast.
Being local to a microcenter has saved my life.
I need to go out there today in fact to get this machine I have here running, just trying to figure out what is wrong with it.
It is a Dell... go figure.
I think the hard drive is toast. It starts to boot and locks on the windows logo as it loads up, it will go into safe mode so maybe I just need to nuke it and start over but that will really upset my son as he has tons of games on it.

JimmyH
07-03-10, 05:24 PM
I can feel what you guys are saying
I used to love building computers that was part of the fun but that was When I had time to debug them
I recently built a gaming rig and it seems I spent all my time trying to work out the kinks
for a workstation there is no way I am going to do that
say what you want about Dell but I have been using them for years with almost no issues. They are fast for the money and reliable as the day is long. They made their name on stellar customer service selling systems with questionable reliability. Now they are the other way around. Which is why use them. I don't need their tech support anyway. Besides show me any tech manufacturer who has acceptable customer service. I bet you cannot find one.

bjv
07-03-10, 06:42 PM
I'm overflowing with computers. Right now I'm typing on my home desktop computer that I built about 16 months ago. I've tinkered with computers for a long time but had not built an entire computer for 10 years or so. I researched parts, ordered what I selected and put it together. Basically I bought an Intel Q9400 quad core processor, 4GB of ram, 640GB hard drive, and put it together with WinXP. I overclocked it to 3.8GHz, ran it awhile for testing, then dropped it back to 3.4GHz for everyday use. When Win7 was open for preorders last summer I sent in my preorder, received the actual OS at the end of October, and did a fresh install on the computer. This machine works flawlessly and is very fast. This machine is powering a single 20" IBM LCD monitor (normal aspect ratio, not widescreen).

I already had 2 laptops at home, a Dell that is now about 6 years old and a Dell business class machine that was then 1 year old, running Windows Vista. I was always intrigued by the netbooks but I wanted something a touch bigger and with a more substantial processor, so I requested a 13" Toshiba with dual core processor for Christmas. If I'm at home I may be using any of the 3 newer machines to access CF.

At work I do a lot of CAD, and about 1.5 years ago I had built a new CAD workstation. It is very similar to my home desktop machine, since I selected and spec'd the parts for both. At the time I selected a fast dual core processor for this machine in lieu of a not so fast quad core processor. So that particular machine runs 3.8GHz 24/7. This machine is powering dual 22" widescreen monitors.

JimmyH
07-03-10, 07:51 PM
What video card on your workstation? I have a quadro fx3400 but i am intrigued by the new gen of nvs card since I don't do much 3D anymore

Sevillian273
07-03-10, 07:52 PM
I no expert, but from my understanding it is safe to overclock 24/7 as long as you leave the cpu voltage alone and only raise the bus speed/multiplier.

JimmyH
07-03-10, 08:01 PM
Heat is your biggest limiting factor
it's typically what kills a CPU
in a gaming rig or rendering farm overclocking raises temps so you really need good cooling

bjv
07-03-10, 08:13 PM
Heat is your biggest limiting factor
it's typically what kills a CPU
in a gaming rig or rendering farm overclocking raises temps so you really need good cooling

Yes, heat and voltage somewhat go together. You don't have to increase voltages to overclock but some motherboards do automatically. What I've found is that you can overclock a good amount with stock settings, or with the things that the motherboard changes automatically for you. If you want to really find the limit of the processor's ability to overclock, you can gain 5-10% in speed by carefully adjusting all of the different voltage settings. I'm not patient enough for that. In both of my overclocked machines I was a bit interested in how they would run, but I didn't need every last bit of speed so I backed down a bit. As for 24/7, my machines have speedstep enabled so if you aren't running a load on the processor, the motherboard will drop the speed down a bit. When you hit the processor with a load then it throttles up to full speed. Also every machine I build I install extra case fans and I also use one of the best CPU coolers that I can get.

Since I built the 2 machines for myself, I've built 3 new CAD workstations for my office. These all used the i5-750 cpu, overclocked to 3.8-3.9 GHz. After testing I dropped them down to about 3.5GHz for everyday use.

Sevillian273
07-03-10, 09:07 PM
So far, the highest I can get out of my Athlon II x3 is 3.7ghz (247mhz X 15) on stock voltage. I havent seen any heat increase that I can tell and I have a zalman 9700 cooler. I had to slow the memory down from 800mhz to 667mhz to get past 3.3 ghz. I guess it was causing the memory to run too fast giving me the blue screen. I'd really like to see 3.8 or even 4.0 ghz but I refuse to raise the voltage as I want the processor to last at least a year or two. I have read that the core i-series processors can reach 4ghz and beyond on air cooling - pretty impressive. I've also read about a team of enthusiasts reaching 7ghz with liquid helium. :eek:

Stingroo
07-03-10, 09:11 PM
A friend of mine has an i7 that he runs at 4ghz. They're crazy processors. My next laptop will definitely have an i-series processor (or whatever surpasses them in the next year or two).

gdwriter
07-04-10, 02:14 AM
Besides show me any tech manufacturer who has acceptable customer service. I bet you cannot find one.At the risk of being flamed as a fanboy, I've had excellent service from Apple. Whenever I've had to send my computer in, it's always been one day for me to ship it, they fix it the day it arrives and ship it back out, and I get it back the next day.

A few weeks ago, my laptop started making a loud buzzing sound after using it for a few hours. I was afraid it was the hard drive and called tech support (you can set up a call online, and a tech will call you right away or at a time you set). After running diagnostics, we figured it was the fans. The problem went away for a couple weeks, then came back with a vengeance after several hours of hard use. Using one of the widgets, I could see the fans were running at high RPMs.

Since the problem had gone away and I didn’t really have time to go to the nearest Apple Store in Portland, I had canceled my service appointment.

So when the buzzing resumed in earnest, I called again to make an appointment on my way to the airport last week. I figured if they had to check it in, it would be less of an issue to be without my computer while I was at Disneyland and Sea World.

Now, my extended warranty had expired just a few days prior. At the store, I explained the problem, and the tech said they wanted to run a couple of tests to confirm it was the fans, and they might be able to repair it in the store. But it would take about an hour. Fortunately, I scheduled the appointment in plenty of time to make it to the airport.

And an hour later, while I was killing time at a bookstore, they called to tell me they had found a bad bearing in one of the fans, the tech was making the repair, and it would be ready in about 20 minutes. Which it was. No charge.

I'd call that more than acceptable service. I'd call it damn good.

ewill3rd
07-04-10, 07:19 AM
Looks like something got to this motherboard.
I have two rows of capacitors next to the CPU that look to be fried.
Maybe a brown out got it.
I ordered motherboard off of ebay for like 25 bucks.
I tested everything else but the power supply and I'll check that before the board goes in.
My son is going nuts without his computer, he is playing games on his little brother's computer right now... lol.

ryannel2003
07-04-10, 09:49 AM
I've got a year old 13" MacBook. 2GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB RAM, 160GB HD, SuperDrive. It's been a great little workhorse... I've dropped it on tile and it has a few dents on the casing and it still works like new. I was so pissed when I dropped it though... I'm very anal about my computers. I too have had great customer service from Apple. When my power adapter died early this year I called them up on a Monday morning and they sent me the box Tuesday morning. Wed. morning I had a brand new power adapter at my doorstep. I've always enjoyed my Apple products.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n46/ryannel2003/MacBook/IMG_0366.jpg

Stingroo
07-04-10, 10:04 AM
Despite my Dell's issues, I've had great service from them personally (shock, horror). The trick is NEVER use the phone support. You don't want to talk to "Mike from Dallas" (AKA Mumumbo from Uzbekistan).

Then again my laptop was purchased under a business account... I do seem to always get the intelligent people when I sign in.

JimmyH
07-04-10, 11:46 AM
there are always going to be heart-felt stories and horror-stories from any manufacturer, so it does not surprise me anyone would be happy with Apple or Dell (two of the comp mfgs who get blasted the most for their service)

With Dell, you might get "Mike from Dallas" On their main-stream systems, yes you are going to get overseas support. But their high-end systems get you American-based support. Particularly, the XPS line (on the home side) and Precision (on the business side) You pay extra for it for sure, but that is worth it to some people.

Most of the folks in this thread, talking about building pcs, obviously know more than their tech support does, so why complain about poor tech support? I can usually noodle out solutions myself, and the few times I have been stumped, I google for the answer and almost always have found it on some tech forum.

Stingroo
07-04-10, 11:47 AM
Yeah, the only time I ever call or use tech support is when I know something is wrong (like when my fans died) so that they could send me the part and get it over with.

JimmyH
07-04-10, 11:52 AM
I wont even go that far anymore. I would rather spend $20 out of pocket (like when my dvd drive was acting up on a laptop) than spend the 2 hours on the phone and then deal with some dopey tech guy coming out to fix it.

Stingroo
07-04-10, 12:26 PM
Well fortunately, being on the business end all I have to do is tell them what I need and they'll ship the part out to me so I can do it myself.

JimmyH
07-04-10, 03:03 PM
I Actually order all my computers from the sbs side of Dell
if you buy enough from them they will sell you anything from the home side and give you a discount

gdwriter
07-04-10, 03:19 PM
As with my cars, I often have an inkling what might be wrong with my computer, but I don't have the full compliment of technical skills to fix either. So I appreciate a mechanic or tech support person who actually listens to me and doesn't treat me like some clueless idiot.

Submariner409
07-04-10, 05:11 PM
Computers..........I know what I'm driving, but consider myself lucky if I can replace a video card or add RAM and have the thing start up!

Mouse batteries used to be a challenge.........

Annapolis Computers and Chesapeake Computers (their techs) are my life support.

codewize
07-04-10, 11:01 PM
If you can keep the thing cooled within spec and it remains stable, OC all day long. Cooling is the key.


I no expert, but from my understanding it is safe to overclock 24/7 as long as you leave the cpu voltage alone and only raise the bus speed/multiplier.

Dell support is non existent, period.

Apple support is superior to all others because they don't fix anything, they replace. Apple wont' add memory to a MacBook pro either. I guess they're so complicated to take apart even the Apple genius guys won't do it.

Newegg does handle returns with ease but yes, it gets old real fast, especially when you put a workstation into service for a client and it dies on day 3. That of course is after you've billed them for the setup time and all.

bjv
07-05-10, 12:13 AM
If you can keep the thing cooled within spec and it remains stable, OC all day long. Cooling is the key.

All of the machines that I've built and overclocked recently used some of the best aftermarket cpu coolers I could find. In the process of building new machines for our CAD technicians and then giving their older computers to someone else in the company, I had occasion to reload a machine with a 3.0GHz Intel dual core processor, with stock Intel cooler and running at stock speeds. This machine, at STOCK speeds, ran hotter with the stock cooler than the machines that I heavily overclock with good aftermarket cpu coolers. So in that case the overclocked machine is running under less risk than the stock machine you are likely to buy retail.

JimmyH
07-05-10, 01:35 PM
If you can keep the thing cooled within spec and it remains stable, OC all day long. Cooling is the key.



Dell support is non existent, period.

Apple support is superior to all others because they don't fix anything, they replace. Apple wont' add memory to a MacBook pro either. I guess they're so complicated to take apart even the Apple genius guys won't do it.

Newegg does handle returns with ease but yes, it gets old real fast, especially when you put a workstation into service for a client and it dies on day 3. That of course is after you've billed them for the setup time and all.


I suppose we all have our demons

CIWS
07-05-10, 04:01 PM
Overclocking, won't that just make the time wrong on the computer. Like it will be too fast . . . Or do I have it backwards and it's like overdrinking and time slows down . .

:mystery:


Newegg - Not the business they used to be.

JimmyH
07-05-10, 04:13 PM
I just wiped and re-OS'd a friends computer. Sometimes, I think, being computer savvy can be a draw-back. I spend a half hour trying to figure out why windows update would not work, before I finally read the fine print and read that the date on the computer was not correctly set :rolleyes:

gdwriter
07-05-10, 04:50 PM
Apple support is superior to all others because they don't fix anything, they replace.I'd rather have something broken replaced with a brand new component rather than trying to fix something that's already broken once and could easily break again. And if it's faster to do it that way, I'm all for it.

ben.gators
07-05-10, 05:40 PM
I've got a year old 13" MacBook. 2GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB RAM, 160GB HD, SuperDrive. It's been a great little workhorse... I've dropped it on tile and it has a few dents on the casing and it still works like new. I was so pissed when I dropped it though... I'm very anal about my computers. I too have had great customer service from Apple. When my power adapter died early this year I called them up on a Monday morning and they sent me the box Tuesday morning. Wed. morning I had a brand new power adapter at my doorstep. I've always enjoyed my Apple products.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n46/ryannel2003/MacBook/IMG_0366.jpg

Huh, interesting, we both have the same car, Seville STS (mine is 99 STS), almost the same laptop (mine is Mac Book Pro), the same cellphone, T-Mobile Motorola, and the exact bed setting! :D

Stingroo
07-05-10, 05:46 PM
Now THAT is creepy. lol

ben.gators
07-05-10, 05:48 PM
Now THAT is creepy. lol

Why it is creepy? :D

JimmyH
07-05-10, 06:01 PM
if the iphone4 is any indication, I think we are starting to see apple start to move out of its growth phase after re-inventing itself. which means they will soon be making cuts on their generous replacement policies. my sister's friend has had the screen on her macbook replaced twice under warranty. not because it failed, but because she dropped it and it shattered. a few hundered dollars worth of LCD buys a whole lot of good word of mouth PR. but that wont last forever.

gary88
07-05-10, 11:06 PM
Apple can afford to do that by selling me things like a $30 dock that probably cost less than $5 to make :ill:

JimmyH
07-05-10, 11:17 PM
the ipod dock? that thing can't be more than .20 of plastic, and not much more than that in manufacturing. but then you have packaging, shipping, marketing, insurance, more marketing, overhead costs, design, more insurance, re-design, more marketing, subsidies, employee benefits, board member benefits, payoffs to foreign officials, payoffs to foreign "investors", banking costs, interest costs, more insurance, more marketing.......it's a wonder they can make any money on it at $30 each.

codewize
07-06-10, 01:04 AM
And by charging you twice the money the same system would cost in a PC form. Now that Apple uses the same Intel processors that PC's do, what are you really paying for?

No more RISC so I really don't see the point in the extra cost for a designer computer. I'm not saying Apples is bad and I'm not saying I don't like them I just don't get it.


Apple can afford to do that by selling me things like a $30 dock that probably cost less than $5 to make :ill:

ewill3rd
07-06-10, 06:35 AM
I can see the old apple guys being all ga-ga since they used to be very different.
Like you, code, I don't get the concept of paying more money just to have an apple these days.
Also like you, I figure to each his own. I have just gone too far down the old PC path to make a jump like that.

I need more computer pictures though!

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 11:19 AM
And by charging you twice the money the same system would cost in a PC form. Now that Apple uses the same Intel processors that PC's do, what are you really paying for?


Not to mention that the Apple OS is just a skinned version of FreeBSD, which you, I, or anyone else can go download and install at any time.

Hell, I once skinned one of my Linux Ubuntu installs to mimic OSX EXACTLY.

So, Apple hardware is the same as PC (in fact it usually lags a half-generation or so) and the software is skinned versions of free alternatives. Yet, it carries the hefty price tag it's known for.

Apple can sell a ketchup popsicle to a woman in white gloves because they know marketing better than anyone else. They can't sell you and I their product because we know exactly what we are getting and can see through the crap. The rest of the world either isn't as bright or doesn't care as much, allowing themselves to become victims of Apple's marketing genius.

gary88
07-06-10, 12:03 PM
And by charging you twice the money the same system would cost in a PC form. Now that Apple uses the same Intel processors that PC's do, what are you really paying for?

No more RISC so I really don't see the point in the extra cost for a designer computer. I'm not saying Apples is bad and I'm not saying I don't like them I just don't get it.

In the two years I've had my MBP I haven't had a single problem with it all, it has run like clockwork since the day it arrived at my door. That alone is worth the premium for me. Then there's the quality aluminum case that really doesn't show signs of wear compared to your typical plastic cased Windows laptop that starts to get shiny after about a year. Upgrading to 10.6 from 10.5 cost me $30, last time I checked a new copy of Windows 7 was around $150. Then there are all the other intangible things about Macs that make them nice to use such as how they automatically defragment files when they're accessed, the large trackpad with multitouch functions, spaces which lets me have up to 16 virtual desktops, expose to quickly open/hide windows (both accessible by multitouch), spotlight for quickly locating any file on either my internal or external HDD (superior to the search function on Windows), just dragging a program to the trash to delete it instead of going through an uninstall wizard, heck you can even natively run Windows on a Mac if you want to (can't natively run OSX on a PC). Plus, specifically beneficial for me, Photoshop and Lightroom run much much better on my Mac than on my previous Vaios.

If you try to justify the price of a Mac by just comparing it to a Windows machine then of course they won't make sense. Just like there's more to a car than horsepower and 0-60 times, there's more factors that go into having a computer that's a pleasure to use other than tech specs. The extra money I paid for my Mac that runs perfectly is definitely worth avoiding the stress and frustration of running a Windows machine after awhile. Your mileage may vary.

::flame suit on::

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 12:06 PM
There are also many Windows users who's machines have worked well since the day they bought them.

The difference is that Windows users have the freedom to mess up their computers if they choose to. Mac users can only do what Steve Jobs says is good for them...

gary88
07-06-10, 12:16 PM
Right.

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 12:25 PM
Right.

http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/15448_iphone_4.jpg

codewize
07-06-10, 12:40 PM
As I said earlier. I have a 5 year old XP box on my desk without issues for 5 years.

The people that have hardware issues are the people who buy off the shelf pre made $300 computers. You get what you pay for. If you buy high end matching hardware and build a system, you'll pay around $1000 every time but you'll have that machine for years to come. I'm only retiring my PC because I want to move to Win 7 and it's easier to just start fresh.

Now, having said that I do recognize that Apple does use hi grade materials in the builds. I also recognize that Apple has very very close reigns on drivers, which is why the hardware and software integration is seamless and almost flawless. However, that's also the reason you can't work on an Apple product.


There are also many Windows users who's machines have worked well since the day they bought them.

The difference is that Windows users have the freedom to mess up their computers if they choose to. Mac users can only do what Steve Jobs says is good for them...

MrBoffo
07-06-10, 12:42 PM
In the two years I've had my MBP I haven't had a single problem with it all, it has run like clockwork since the day it arrived at my door. That alone is worth the premium for me. Then there's the quality aluminum case that really doesn't show signs of wear compared to your typical plastic cased Windows laptop that starts to get shiny after about a year. Upgrading to 10.6 from 10.5 cost me $30, last time I checked a new copy of Windows 7 was around $150. Then there are all the other intangible things about Macs that make them nice to use such as how they automatically defragment files when they're accessed, the large trackpad with multitouch functions, spaces which lets me have up to 16 virtual desktops, expose to quickly open/hide windows (both accessible by multitouch), spotlight for quickly locating any file on either my internal or external HDD (superior to the search function on Windows), just dragging a program to the trash to delete it instead of going through an uninstall wizard, heck you can even natively run Windows on a Mac if you want to (can't natively run OSX on a PC). Plus, specifically beneficial for me, Photoshop and Lightroom run much much better on my Mac than on my previous Vaios.

If you try to justify the price of a Mac by just comparing it to a Windows machine then of course they won't make sense. Just like there's more to a car than horsepower and 0-60 times, there's more factors that go into having a computer that's a pleasure to use other than tech specs. The extra money I paid for my Mac that runs perfectly is definitely worth avoiding the stress and frustration of running a Windows machine after awhile. Your mileage may vary.

::flame suit on::

My windows machine has an aluminum case. I haven't had an infection since I used XP SP1, which was several years ago. I run no antivirus/malware software. My OS cost nothing beyond the system, Windows delivers drivers and updates for free. My last system came with Vista and a free upgrade to 7.

Auto-defragment is great for mechanical hard drives. My SSD mobile unit wouldn't appreciate that very much. But thats right, Mac units aren't meant to be upgraded, they are sealed. My current mobile allows me to swap RAM and storage without voiding the warranty even. Moot point.

I'll be frank, multi-touch does nothing for me. I don't care for most touchscreens either, so I'm just weird like that. It sounds like for certain users there is something to it, but outside of looking at pictures I can't find a use for it.

Linux does virtual desktops, as many or few as you want. However, I don't find it all that useful; adding a second monitor is far better for productivity if you need the space.

I have my data organized, and search never fails me on other users' systems.

The point of the uninstall wizard is to give you control over what happens to the data/associations after the uninstall. There are reasons you may want to only remove the software and not the saved project data, or other times you want everything removed. Sure, an extra process, but one that gives the user more control if they know what they are after.

I don't know about lightroom, but photoshop can run better on a windows machine with a decent graphics card because of GPU acceleration and driver support. Linux has/is Gimp.


I think the main point with all of these is that a Mac is all-inclusive. You don't need to do anything, the software is limited and restricted with Mac, but its included. On their phones systems you can pay for software that would be free on windows or linux, but the difference is that the software is already found for you. Windows is much more flexible, and allows power users to do things beyond what Windows ships with. Linux is the most flexible, but is the least friendly to non-power users. To me, I balance out Windows as being the stable go-to system when I need things to work (plug n play/driver support) and Linux when I want battery life, customization, or security in potentially unsecure environments.

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 12:44 PM
Now, having said that I do recognize that Apple does use hi grade materials in the builds.

No better than a PC manufacturer.

Apple uses Intel chips, Foxconn boards, and Western Digital drives. None of that is any different than a regular pc manufacturer, say, Dell. The high grade component argument is an internet myth. The only area you might be able to say is higher grade is the chassis itself, but manufacturers are quickly catching up/suprassing Apple in this area with machines like the fantastic HP Envy.

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 12:47 PM
I think the main point with all of these is that a Mac is all-inclusive. You don't need to do anything, the software is limited and restricted with Mac, but its included. On their phones systems you can pay for software that would be free on windows or linux, but the difference is that the software is already found for you. Windows is much more flexible, and allows power users to do things beyond what Windows ships with. Linux is the most flexible, but is the least friendly to non-power users. To me, I balance out Windows as being the stable go-to system when I need things to work (plug n play/driver support) and Linux when I want battery life, customization, or security in potentially unsecure environments.

:yup:

MrBoffo
07-06-10, 12:53 PM
No better than a PC manufacturer.

Apple uses Intel chips, Foxconn boards, and Western Digital drives. None of that is any different than a regular pc manufacturer, say, Dell. The high grade component argument is an internet myth. The only area you might be able to say is higher grade is the chassis itself, but manufacturers are quickly catching up/suprassing Apple in this area with machines like the fantastic HP Envy.

The Timeline series has stepped up their chassis materials as well, using black aluminum. Although the old ones were also built like tanks, just lacking the soda can casing.

Sevillian273
07-06-10, 04:36 PM
No better than a PC manufacturer.

Apple uses Intel chips, Foxconn boards, and Western Digital drives. None of that is any different than a regular pc manufacturer, say, Dell. The high grade component argument is an internet myth. The only area you might be able to say is higher grade is the chassis itself, but manufacturers are quickly catching up/suprassing Apple in this area with machines like the fantastic HP Envy.

Actually foxconn is widely known in the DIY market as a lesser quality board maker. If i'm going to buy a mac anything it had better have an Asus board under the hood.

Fortunately for Steve, the whole "I dont need to do anything, everything is taken care of for me, it just works. (and it's shiny!)" is major marketing leverage for getting people hooked onto the Mac trend. For the majority it doenst matter whats under the hood or whether or not it's current as long as it works, perfectly, every time. Jobs is a genius. A rich rich rich marketing genius.

drewsdeville
07-06-10, 05:45 PM
Actually foxconn is widely known in the DIY market as a lesser quality board maker. If i'm going to buy a mac anything it had better have an Asus board under the hood.


Blasphemy!!! Foxconn is an excellent name. Sure, the name isn't as big as Asus, but that doesn't make them of lesser quality. I've used many Foxconn boards that were well optioned like the best of them (Asus, Gigabyte, ECS, MSI, etc). I usually find them superior because of their excellent physical layout, something Gigabyte can't get straight.

But if Asus is your forte, I've seen HP use Asus boards in the past. Also, in my basement, I have a really nice (when it was new) Asus M2N-E that died within a year of my use. It was replaced by a Foxconn.

All have their pros and cons, but I myself consider Foxconn to be a fantastic name.

Submariner409
07-06-10, 06:23 PM
Your new avatar is really the cat's meow !!!!

Sevillian273
07-06-10, 07:24 PM
Blasphemy!!! Foxconn is an excellent name. Sure, the name isn't as big as Asus, but that doesn't make them of lesser quality. I've used many Foxconn boards that were well optioned like the best of them (Asus, Gigabyte, ECS, MSI, etc). I usually find them superior because of their excellent physical layout, something Gigabyte can't get straight.

But if Asus is your forte, I've seen HP use Asus boards in the past. Also, in my basement, I have a really nice (when it was new) Asus M2N-E that died within a year of my use. It was replaced by a Foxconn.

All have their pros and cons, but I myself consider Foxconn to be a fantastic name.

I've chatted with a few experienced builders who have built more systems than you or I will ever see in our lifetimes and the general consensus between them is that foxconn is of lesser quality having a higher failure rate compared to asus and gigabyte boards. I myself have only been through a handful of boards so I cant make any recommendations based on personal experience. I tend to follow the general rule: 'You get what you pay for'

ewill3rd
07-06-10, 08:43 PM
I used to buy ABIT, but switched to ASUS.
I did some MSI builds but ran into troubles so I was headed back to ASUS and was directed to a Gigabyte board that I have been super happy with.
I have Asus boards almost 10 years old running perfectly with only a CMOS battery swap better than the day I bought them.
I have motherboards that have outlasted hard drives, power supplies, CD drives, all kinds of stuff and most of them are Asus boards.
Never used or even heard of foxconn.
I bought a Celeron based Dell computer, what a toad that thing is... I ramped up the RAM, put in an audio card and I think I did a video card too and it is still junk.
I do have a couple of Dells that are in decent shape though, but I rely on my fabricated stuff.
I am not qualified to enter a PC vs Mac debate as I haven't touched one for a couple of decades, all I can say is that PC's have come a long way since I started battling with my 3.11 machine in the nineties.

codewize
07-06-10, 09:27 PM
Abit was awesome in the day. They were first to market with the jumperless MoBo, the IT5H. I had one and OC'ed the crap out of a Pentium 200. That thing ran at 250MHz for almost 7 years, then I gave it away.

Now a days it Supermicro or nothing. I won't buy a board from anyone else.

MSI makes some very nice nVidia cards. They do very very well in benchmarks. I've only worked with one MSI MoBo and it was because it died and I was replacing it.

ASUS also very good products

ewill3rd
07-06-10, 09:43 PM
I had some really nice ABIT machines but they all died horrible deaths.
I was RMA-ing motherboards left and right and I just finally gave up.
Too much trouble.
Since I was building computers for my company it got me in hot water with the boss a couple of times.
Of course the salespeople getting porn site viruses on the network wasn't helping any!
(this was not where I work now!)

We had guys in the back shop that rendered a computer so screwed up browsing porn that within a month I just had to disconnect it from the network and tell them "too bad" because there was no hope for it.

JimmyH
07-06-10, 11:33 PM
To be fair to Mac, Macbooks are slightly overpriced. They are not excessively so. And iMacs are price competitive with other AIO computers. I don't know about MacPros, because there are just too many variables in workstation class machines.

And to be fair to windows, I had an imac for while, and I managed to lock it up plenty of times, so Mac stability is not all it claims to be.

Gary, you CAN run OSX on a PC if you know where to look. And saying you can run Windows natively on a Mac is not entirely accurate. You are still relying on bootcamp and its drivers, and there are some issues there, at least there were when I was using it. I imagine they have worked many, if not all of the kinks by now though.

I give credit to Apple, they really do make an excellent computer. The biggest problem though, is that they have failed to drum up application support. what do they have really? Adobe Creative Suite? Considering the falling out Apple and Adobe have had, you better keep CS4 and OSX, because that is likely to be the last solid platform. And MS office? I have heard nothing but complaints from the Mac crowd. As for the rest of us, running CAD, software development, accounting, database, etc etc, Mac will never ever be feasible.

gdwriter
07-07-10, 12:56 AM
And MS office? I have heard nothing but complaints from the Mac crowd. As for the rest of us, running CAD, software development, accounting, database, etc etc, Mac will never ever be feasible.Office is horrible. Slow as a VW microbus going uphill. Word will frequently crash on me. And Microsoft's default formatting sucks balls. What, with all their money they couldn't hire a decent graphic designer? At least the Mac version retains the standard menu formats Apple requires. Office 2007 is an absolute clusterf*** in terms of its menus. When I have to help my boss with a PowerPoint on her PC, I usually need a Xanax or a stiff drink afterward.

Unfortunately, Office still has some capabilities that iWork doesn't, and they're ones I need. For example, I color-key my grading comments using style sheets, and I have them all hot keyed so I don't have to go to the style menu every single time. Pages doesn't offer that (at least not yet). Otherwise, I would have dropped Office like a hot potato ages ago.

I haven't used Creative Suite 5, so I don't know if that's less stable or capable than CS4, which I use quite a bit. Adobe has a large installed Mac customer base considering it's still the platform of choice for graphic designers, so I doubt they'd bail on loyal users like that.

I expect there are some heavier duty accounting programs that are PC only, but Intuit's QuickBooks has been very capable and easy to use in the small businesses where I've used it. And I've used Quicken for 18 years; I absolutely depend on it, both for my personal finances and keeping track of business expenses for my freelance work.

Jesda
07-07-10, 09:28 AM
That little bit of refinement that Apple develops into their products makes a big difference in everyday usability and satisfaction. Apple makes it pleasurable to use a computer. Its why they're luxury goods. No one needs them, but they sure are nice to have (like our Cadillacs).

I'm a spreadsheet junkie; I recently switched from Excel 2008 to iWork/Numbers. Excel '08 is a pig that takes forever to launch and crashes often but its a bit better at moving quickly through cells and sheets. I'm still having trouble letting go of Microsoft Word -- I'm so used to it. As for enterprise-level stuff, it doesn't really apply to me. The old 2002-era Mac Office for PowerPC was much more stable. I'm not running any Apple-approved motherboards or video devices, but its compatible.

My Atom-powered Lenovo netbook runs Office 2003 and will continue to until I have a good reason to upgrade. It opens in 2 seconds and has a tiny memory footprint.

CIWS
07-07-10, 09:32 AM
I've chatted with a few experienced builders who have built more systems than you or I will ever see in our lifetimes and the general consensus between them is that foxconn is of lesser quality having a higher failure rate compared to asus and gigabyte boards.
:yeah:

Foxconn is an "average" build company. Known more for some of the parts on the MBs than their MBs themselves in the PC world. Lately their 1156 pin CPU sockets have had some issues with frying under heavy load and lunching the boards they're on. If you're not an overclocker and just need a board to run a CPU/PC then several brands will do the trick. Of course the main Foxconn plant in China does appear to be the place to commit suicide lately.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/may/28/foxconn-plant-china-deaths-suicides

drewsdeville
07-07-10, 10:10 AM
Well, while the Foxconn labeled boards themselves really aren't marketed to enthusiast builders and therefore appear to be "low end", one thing that most don't realize is that Foxconn also produces for other brand boards as well. This includes the big bad dog, Intel. Intel boards are really just Foxconn built boards with Intel labels...and Intel boards have one of the best, if not THE best reputation for performance and reliability. Unfortunately, they are generally pricey.

Whatever your preference, the point was that with Apple using Foxconn boards just like many of the other large PC manufacturers, the "apple uses better components" argument isn't exactly true. Of course, that's what Apple would want you to believe, but it's far from the truth.

Jesda
07-07-10, 10:56 AM
Well, while the Foxconn labeled boards themselves really aren't marketed to enthusiast builders and therefore appear to be "low end", one thing that most don't realize is that Foxconn also produces for other brand boards as well. This includes the big bad dog, Intel. Intel boards are really just Foxconn built boards with Intel labels...and Intel boards have one of the best, if not THE best reputation for performance and reliability. Unfortunately, they are generally pricey.

Whatever your preference, the point was that with Apple using Foxconn boards just like many of the other large PC manufacturers, the "apple uses better components" argument isn't exactly true. Of course, that's what Apple would want you to believe, but it's far from the truth.

Its more complicated than that. Internal design accounts for the quality differences between Apple and HP, even though both use FoxConn to put together the final good. Its the same reason Asus earns top marks for reliability despite seeming the same on the outside as any Compaq or HP -- parts are intelligently laid out to avoid heat damage and little things, like power connectors, are designed to be more robust.

FoxConn doesn't typically design hardware; they take orders from vendors and builds them to specification. Likewise, Chrysler and GM may share several international suppliers, but the end result is quite different.

Subaru builds Camrys in Indiana, and Toyota builds Camrys worldwide, but Subaru's own models are higher in quality because of the thought and engineering that went into the product.

It isn't as simple as one company making all of the computers used in the US with badges and brands being the sole differentiator.

I'm sure you've seen the Squaretrade data on warranty claims.

drewsdeville
07-07-10, 11:13 AM
Its more complicated than that. Internal design accounts for the quality differences between Apple and HP, even though both use FoxConn to put together the final good. Its the same reason Asus earns top marks for reliability despite seeming the same on the outside as any Compaq or HP -- parts are intelligently laid out to avoid heat damage and little things, like power connectors, are designed to be more robust.

FoxConn doesn't typically design hardware; they take orders from vendors and builds them to specification. Likewise, Chrysler and GM may share several international suppliers, but the end result is quite different.

Subaru builds Camrys in Indiana, and Toyota builds Camrys worldwide, but Subaru's own models are higher in quality because of the thought and engineering that went into the product.

It isn't as simple as one company making all of the computers used in the US with badges and brands being the sole differentiator.

I'm sure you've seen the Squaretrade data on warranty claims.

Yes, the internal design is important. However, Apple doesn't design any of the individual hardware. They just spec it out from components offered by chipset manufacturers. All motherboards used in a Mac or a PC are a compilation of Nvidia, AMD, Realtek, Intel, Via and other chips assembled into one machine, regardless of manufacturer. None of these chipsets are Apple designed. This is exactly why Apple has had the same past quality issues of other PC manufacturers, mainly with the Nvidia counterparts. Apple doesn't design the Nvidia parts. A Nvidia 9400 in a Mac is the same thing as an Nvidia 9400 in a PC, same goes for the other countless numbers of chipsets on a single board.

Apple would have had the Nvidia chipset problem whether they used Asus or Foxconn to build their boards. The problem was in Nvidia's design, not Asus', Foxconn's, or Apple's.

So yes, while Foxconn takes orders from Apple to build the board, Foxconn also takes orders down the chain from the chipset manufacturers that Apple requests. Foxconn is only the intermediate between the two, they have little to say about design. Those chipset manufacturers are the quality differences that you speak of, NOT the board manufacturers themselves.

However, this doesn't mean that the board production itself isn't a concern. Board brand is still something to consider when speaking of quality. For example, I doubt we will ever see a manufacturer pumping out stellar machines using Biostar boards. But yes, it's not the full equation.

MrBoffo
07-07-10, 11:20 AM
Overall it seems like the quality of all boards is pretty good. For my own personal systems I've been using truly no-name boards that have shoddy documentation and driver CD's that don't work on the OS's they 'support.' At the time they were the only boards under $300 that had the chipset I wanted and happened to be laid out better than the big brands as far as the graphics card not covering up half the sata ports.

Am I the only one who has noticed board quality being higher overall these days? Or am I just lucky?

drewsdeville
07-07-10, 11:38 AM
I think, in recent days, it's luck of the draw really. There's plenty of people out there with dead name-brand boards like Asus and Gigabyte as well.

I agree that the quality gap is narrowing. Today, when you select a board on newegg, you can't really purchase assuming quality by name brand anymore. Newegg reviews are showing DOA's and other problems across all manufacturers.

Personally, when I shop, I look for the friendliest layout and most bundled features. I am, for the most part, no longer brand loyal. I think it ends up limiting your options to the point where you can miss out on some nice product. It's not worth being stubborn about it.

Jesda
07-07-10, 11:38 AM
I think quality is definitely higher. I don't see as many failed capacitors as I used to.

Then again, I'm pretty much out of the hobby. Its become a means to an end for me and not much more.

JimmyH
07-07-10, 02:35 PM
Office is horrible. Slow as a VW microbus going uphill. Word will frequently crash on me. And Microsoft's default formatting sucks balls. What, with all their money they couldn't hire a decent graphic designer? At least the Mac version retains the standard menu formats Apple requires. Office 2007 is an absolute clusterf*** in terms of its menus. When I have to help my boss with a PowerPoint on her PC, I usually need a Xanax or a stiff drink afterward.

Unfortunately, Office still has some capabilities that iWork doesn't, and they're ones I need. For example, I color-key my grading comments using style sheets, and I have them all hot keyed so I don't have to go to the style menu every single time. Pages doesn't offer that (at least not yet). Otherwise, I would have dropped Office like a hot potato ages ago.

I haven't used Creative Suite 5, so I don't know if that's less stable or capable than CS4, which I use quite a bit. Adobe has a large installed Mac customer base considering it's still the platform of choice for graphic designers, so I doubt they'd bail on loyal users like that.

I expect there are some heavier duty accounting programs that are PC only, but Intuit's QuickBooks has been very capable and easy to use in the small businesses where I've used it. And I've used Quicken for 18 years; I absolutely depend on it, both for my personal finances and keeping track of business expenses for my freelance work.



I try to tell people to switch to Corel Office. It is alot cheaper than Office standard, does everything that Word and Excel do (and more) and opens up .doc and .xls just fine. I think X5 even opens docx and xlsx. And Quattro Pro (which is the ORIGINAL spreadsheet program) renders faster than Excel. Of course they dont make a version for Mac.



And I dont know what is going to happen going forward, but Apple and Adobe are VERY much at odds over this whole flash debacle. Each company thinks they are responsible for the other's growth (big heads are not cool heads). Adobe feels the problem lay with Apple (even though it doesnt) and Apple refuses to work with Adobe to fix the problem (even though it is in their own best interest) Not that it really matters. HTML5 will render flash obsolete eventually.

CIWS
07-07-10, 03:17 PM
Sun Open Office is free.

Jesda
07-07-10, 04:54 PM
Hey now James, Visicalc is the original spreadsheet.

bjv
07-07-10, 08:27 PM
Comparing motherboards- I've had good luck with Gigabyte boards. I've used 6 of them in the past 18 months and all have worked well.

ryannel2003
07-08-10, 12:50 AM
Huh, interesting, we both have the same car, Seville STS (mine is 99 STS), almost the same laptop (mine is Mac Book Pro), the same cellphone, T-Mobile Motorola, and the exact bed setting! :D

That picture is about a year old now. I've replaced that damn RAZR about 4 times since then (Samsung Slider, BB Curve, BB Tour, iPhone 3GS). My RAZR's all sucked... got it because it was cheap at the time. I took that picture the night I got it... but it's got a dent in the palmrest and I dropped it one tile and dented the right corner on it since then. :(

I like both platforms for what they are. PC's are much better to game on and easier to reconfigure how you want to... whereas Mac is a completely closed off platform with little to work with. I've been a Mac user for the past 6 years and I've enjoyed all of my Apple products. My latest MacBook has been a workhorse and seen some abuse. Dropped on tile floor about 3 feet and it just dented the corner a bit and a small dent in the palmrest. Just got an iPhone yesterday and throughly enjoying the whole experience. However, I still enjoy using PC's and Windows 7 is a huge leap forward in stability compared to Vista. I still like XP SP3 the best... but that's just me. XP has always been good with me. A few problems over the years but nothing compared to what I had to deal with with 98 and Me.

JimmyH
07-08-10, 02:46 PM
Hey now James, Visicalc is the original spreadsheet.

never used it. But I was using Quattro Pro in school before Excel was thought of and before Lotus 123 made its name.

JimmyH
07-08-10, 02:52 PM
I still dont understand all the negativity surrounding Vista. I have been running it on my Workstation for several years with almost no problems. (occasional lockup and reboot here and there, but it runs 24/7) As an experiment, I decided to install XP on it a few weeks ago for the first time since I got it. And I hate it. The interface seems ancient. The file open and saveas boxes for instance annoy me. The networking is weak-kneed. And while it does fine on programs like Word and Firefox, resource hogs like Photoshop and AutoCAD lag noticeably. Bootup is slightly faster than Vista, until I tweak it with msconfig and get rid of crap, then Vista boots faster than XP. I am going to give it a few more days, then put Seven on.

Stingroo
07-08-10, 03:12 PM
Seven = <3. Got it the day it was released and haven't been happier.

JimmyH
07-08-10, 03:24 PM
I hate sevens new task bar. First thing I do after install is unpin all those icons, and turn text labels back on. And I hate the Action Center. I am still trying to figure out how to disable the friggin thing. Though I have not spent any real effort on it. If anyone knows how...

Stingroo
07-08-10, 03:32 PM
I hated the new task bar at first. Give it a chance. I find it much easier now.

As far as the action center, you can just disable the messages so it never sends you any, but if you figure out how to disable it completely, please share. :)

JimmyH
07-08-10, 03:38 PM
I am obsessive when it comes it to the tasktray. I utterly detest icons down there that I don't want down there. You can turn off all the messages, but that obnoxious little flag pops up down there whenever it damn well pleases, and I hate that.

As for the Seven style taskbar I don't need the pinned icons since I use Objectdock.

Stingroo
07-08-10, 03:39 PM
I'm the opposite of you. I hate desktop icons. I pin everything to the taskbar to keep the desktop clear.

To each his own. :)

gdwriter
07-08-10, 04:42 PM
I'm the opposite of you. I hate desktop icons. I pin everything to the taskbar to keep the desktop clear.Sounds like the dock in OS X. It's easy to choose what programs go there, and I have it so it remains hidden unless my mouse goes to the bottom of the screen.

Stingroo
07-08-10, 04:55 PM
Yeah, similar. Here's my desktop:

http://img811.imageshack.us/img811/7129/desktop1f.png

The things I use every day (Firefox, Word, MSN, Sticky notes) are pinned. AIM just happens to be open right now because I'm on it. Everything else is somewhere on the task bar. I don't do as much with my laptop as I used to.

slk230mb
07-08-10, 05:20 PM
http://blogs.howtogeek.com/mysticgeek/2009/04/21/how-to-manage-action-center-in-windows-7/

drewsdeville
07-08-10, 05:28 PM
Yeah, similar. Here's my desktop:

http://img811.imageshack.us/img811/7129/desktop1f.png

The things I use every day (Firefox, Word, MSN, Sticky notes) are pinned. AIM just happens to be open right now because I'm on it. Everything else is somewhere on the task bar. I don't do as much with my laptop as I used to.

That's a pretty good idea for a new thread...

JimmyH
07-08-10, 08:44 PM
I'm the opposite of you. I hate desktop icons. I pin everything to the taskbar to keep the desktop clear.

To each his own. :)

no no, I hate desktop icons as well. Objectdock is a ripoff of the Mac dock (which is in turn a rip off of Rocket Dock) The dock is one of the things that I really liked about the mac.

http://www.cooleywire.com/jimmyh/pics/comp/desktop.jpg

JimmyH
07-08-10, 08:50 PM
http://blogs.howtogeek.com/mysticgeek/2009/04/21/how-to-manage-action-center-in-windows-7/

awesome, thanks!!!!

Stingroo
07-08-10, 09:00 PM
Whoa. Where can one download that?

I had the "Dell Dock" for awhile, and tried to get it to work but it didn't have the functionality I needed, and was in general just a piece of shit.

JimmyH
07-08-10, 09:03 PM
http://www.stardock.com/products/objectdock/


If you did not like Dell dock, you might not like this one. Same company, Stardock, makes both. Though theirs is alot different than the one they make for Dell. Alot easier to use.

Rocket Dock is another one.
http://rocketdock.com/download

Stingroo
07-08-10, 09:25 PM
Well RocketDock doesn't have 64 bit support, so I can't use that. :(

I'll give ObjectDock a try though.

JimmyH
07-08-10, 09:33 PM
it's a great utility. I would not want to go without it.

ewill3rd
07-09-10, 08:27 AM
My favorite W7 feature by far is that you can click start and type anything and almost instantly get what you want rather than searching through endless menu trees or having fifty icons on the desktop.
I have to admit my desktops have too much on them, I could really clear them out on my 7 machines because I never use them anyway.
Force of habit I guess.

codewize
07-09-10, 08:48 AM
:yup:

My favorite W7 feature by far is that you can click start and type anything and almost instantly get what you want rather than searching through endless menu trees or having fifty icons on the desktop.

Stingroo
07-10-10, 11:38 AM
So I downloaded Object dock. I think I really like it. My only beef with it is that I can't click my start menu because I'm 64 bit. Boo. :(

I'll wait it out though. I actually like this.

ewill3rd
07-10-10, 02:04 PM
My son's Dell motherboard came in yesterday.
I am going to microcenter to get a power supply tester (a good one) to make sure the power supply is good before I plug it in to the new motherboard.
I'll post photos of the fried board later if it fixes it so you can see what happened to this one and you can give me an idea.

ewill3rd
07-10-10, 05:01 PM
His computer is fixed!
$24 on ebay and he watched me replace it.
Here is the row of capacitors. I wussed out on checking the power supply since my tester is at work and if I go to microcenter I'll just buy stuff I don't need.
He is pretty excited and his little brother gets his own computer back! :lol:

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y161/ewill3rd/SAM_0159.jpg

Stingroo
07-10-10, 05:46 PM
Hey Jimmy, not to bug, but where do you get utilities and such for this Object Dock thing? Like something that tells me the volume level of my PC, wifi strength, etc. I'm starting to like this thing. lol

JimmyH
07-11-10, 03:50 PM
So I downloaded Object dock. I think I really like it. My only beef with it is that I can't click my start menu because I'm 64 bit. Boo. :(

I'll wait it out though. I actually like this.

I did not realize that. I don't use the dock to replace the task bar though. I still have my taskbar and start menu on the bottom, and dock on the top. There are some fixes out there, here is one:

http://forums.impulsedriven.com/379108

JimmyH
07-11-10, 03:53 PM
Hey Jimmy, not to bug, but where do you get utilities and such for this Object Dock thing? Like something that tells me the volume level of my PC, wifi strength, etc. I'm starting to like this thing. lol

On my website I have a link to the stacks docklet, as well as some utilities for network, power, and volume icons:

http://www.cooleywire.com/jimmyh/icons/


You can search for objectdock and rocketdock docklets, there are thousands. They are mostly interchangeable too I believe.

http://rocketdock.com/addons/all/popular

Stingroo
07-11-10, 04:09 PM
It worked!

Awesome.

I actually might shell out for pro. I think I'm in love. lol This is seriously a million times better than the stupid Dell dock.

JimmyH
07-12-10, 03:47 PM
Just a note to all, XP, up to sp2, has reached end of support. So has Vista RTM. So if you want to continue to receive updates, you need to install the sp3 for xp, and sp2 for Vista.

codewize
07-12-10, 10:52 PM
If you're still running systems that are that far behind in patches / updates you're probably far to hosed to worry about updating anyway

drewsdeville
07-12-10, 11:16 PM
If you're still running systems that are that far behind in patches / updates you're probably far to hosed to worry about updating anyway

lolz.

Besides, the biggest factor in maintaining system security isn't the software itself, but the decisions that the operator makes.

On most of my computers, I don't even run antivirus, and NEVER have a problem. I use my computer with common sense.

A computer is only as smart as it's owner.

Stingroo
07-12-10, 11:42 PM
^ What drew said.

I have AVG only because my university network requires all users to run anti-virus protection on their computers.

drewsdeville
07-12-10, 11:59 PM
^ What drew said.

I have AVG only because my university network requires all users to run anti-virus protection on their computers.

Yeah, I run MS Security Essentials on my laptop for a similar reason. Lightest anti-virus I've seen yet. Sits at 4.1mb of memory.

Up until then, I was an AVG loyalist since 2003 or so. Good program.

Stingroo
07-13-10, 12:25 AM
Hmm I may have to check that out.

drewsdeville
07-13-10, 12:31 AM
Hmm I may have to check that out.

Yeah, if light-weight is your thing, there's nothing better right now.

That's what used to make AVG so great, but they've strayed from that heritage recently. 7.0 was a big turning point and it really started to get bloated from then on.

ewill3rd
07-13-10, 07:05 AM
I put security essentials on all my stuff because I was using OneCare and they discontinued it in lieu of this one.
I have seen it catch a few things that come up now and then.
I have run without anti-virus on my own machines before but anything that is in a public space, like my computers at work, gets extra protection.
We have AVG free on the machines at work (except mine) and I have seen some stuff hit the network right through it.
(at least as far as I know)
Not to mention the websense they have set up often blocks the updates... oh and no one runs them because most of the folks I work with are computer illeterate and can't click on the flashing icon in the taskbar that says "update your anti-virus moron!".
:lol:

Stingroo
07-13-10, 07:10 AM
Oh, Websense... How I remember finding proxies to get around that crap in high school.... :lol:

It was like that at our school too though, every computer on the network needed some update or another, and all were horribly slow. Bleh.

ewill3rd
07-13-10, 08:19 AM
It never ceases to amaze me how people find time to do stupid stuff.
Not to air some laundry but over the years we have had some people here who look for vacant computers after hours to look for porn or people that can't answer the phone but have time to check for what is happening to paris hilton online or watch the panda cam at the zoo.
As a result of these persistent behaviors they got websense wrapped around our internet pretty tightly here.
Some computers have lighter filtering than others but they do it by IP.

Stingroo
07-13-10, 09:13 AM
Yeah, at school it was so stupid even wikipedia was blocked in all the windows labs. It was stupidly insane.

EcSTSatic
07-13-10, 10:34 AM
I work in the IT dept at Spirit AeroSystems (formerly Boeing Commercial in Wichita). I use a 4 year old Dell that I bought in our company's surplus store for $150, It has XP Pro loaded. Works great.

Almost forgot: I sometimes check the forum on my HP ipaq PDA or my company Blackberry

johnny kannapo
07-13-10, 06:36 PM
http://www.casemodgod.com/ModProjectLogs/ToasterPC/toasterpc1.jpg

GizmoQ
07-13-10, 08:50 PM
Wow I feel so outdated. I've been using a 1.2Ghz Tablet for the last three years. And it does everything I need it to do, everywhere I need it to do it - and I do mean everywhere.

http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/imagehosting/1310749075aff1c643.jpg

Oh, did I mention it has 12 USBs hanging off it in the car for HD FM Radio, XM, OBDII, joystick, GPS, external 1TB, Sierra Wireless Aircard 550, DVD-RW, BluSoleil Bluetooth, TPMS, Valentine 1, and a relay controller for the windows, sunroof, trunk, locks, and air horns. All controlled via joystick:

http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/imagehosting/13107493da92a3caf6.jpg


I routinely have GPS, video, Internet, and bluetooth (with OBDII, V1, TPMS, and FM Traffic Alert monitoring) all running at the same time. I usually only listen to one audio/video source at a time, but the GPS and monitored systems all have override A/V warnings that interrupts on screen data. I love my internet radio!




But thats just me.

JimmyH
07-14-10, 01:17 PM
^^anyone who might think he is BSing, let me assure you, he is not :D


he's about three solenoids away from having a car that drives itself

Stingroo
07-14-10, 01:23 PM
I actually really really want to see that car some day. It looks so incredibly badass. lol

JimmyH
07-14-10, 01:32 PM
it sounds even more bad ass when he presses on the steering wheel :D

MacMuse
07-14-10, 03:16 PM
it sounds even more bad ass when he presses on the steering wheel :D

You mean the little yellow button near the gear shift (now on the joystick since we last saw it).

codewize
07-14-10, 04:11 PM
What? That's crazy ass. I need some of that. I still want to do the PC install and upgrade the inputs on my 01 head unit to accept AUX inputs.

Sevillian273
07-14-10, 04:35 PM
I see a 'GUNS' button. Sweet.

GizmoQ
07-14-10, 09:17 PM
I see a 'GUNS' button. Sweet.

It's there on a dare. It plays a wave file of a M-61 Vulcan 20MM gatlin gun used on the F-16 Fighting Falcon. Sounds kind like this:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Y_oEgkiJ8m4&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Y_oEgkiJ8m4&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

There's also a Missile button keyed to a wave of an AGM-65 Maverick coming off the rails of an F-16.

Both play over the stereo but on my Mustang they play thu weatherproof speakers under the front of the car.

JimmyH
07-16-10, 12:52 AM
that's why they call him Gizmo