: GM Canada Employee Pricing Event



garfin
06-26-10, 05:56 PM
2010/2011 CTS-V (sedan only) which has a list of $72,045 in Canada is now eligible for a $7,263 discount on vehicles delivered between June 23/10 and Aug.31/10.
http://www.gm.ca/gm/english/offers/cadillac/employee-pricing-event/overview?adv=99264

Best regards,

Elie

newcadman
06-26-10, 07:13 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the CTS-V Canada price of $72,045 that you quote on your thread actually the "base" price of the car before any option(s) are even added to the price of car. I can't help but think a more realistic price is around the $80,000 range and even more if fully loaded!
As for the "discount" it really works out to be approx. 10 % which is realistically what a new car buyer should shoot for when dealing any way?
Since the Canadian dollar is around .95/.96 cents in comparison to the U.S. dollar at present I would like to know how the pricing of the identical CTS-V compares between being bought in Canada and the U.S.A !

garfin
06-27-10, 09:49 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the CTS-V Canada price of $72,045 that you quote on your thread actually the "base" price of the car before any option(s) are even added to the price of car. I can't help but think a more realistic price is around the $80,000 range and even more if fully loaded!
As for the "discount" it really works out to be approx. 10 % which is realistically what a new car buyer should shoot for when dealing any way?
Since the Canadian dollar is around .95/.96 cents in comparison to the U.S. dollar at present I would like to know how the pricing of the identical CTS-V compares between being bought in Canada and the U.S.A !

You are correct about $72,045 being the base price with no options. Also have to consider that GM Canada charges $1420 for freight... and in Ontario you gotta add 13% tax to the price (or on the difference if there is a trade-in). GM Canada has been offering cash incentives on all CTS models over at least the last year (if not longer) ranging from $4000 to $6500.
The other factor in this equation seems to be that allotment for Canadian dealers is fairly small and as a result, there doesn't seem to be much willingness on the part of dealers to discount very much, if at all.
I had an experience with a Canadian dealer in October who had an '09 demo. In service date was June or July '09, which is when I found out about it as I was looking for a manual car. The car had about 2600 KM on the clock and the warranty was tickin' away. The dealer wouldn't budge on price beyond what GM Canada was offering as an incentive. Why? It was the only 6MN available in Canada!
Interestingly enough, I see that the dealer is still trying to sell it - a year later!! It is still classified as a demo, but it now has 11,000 KM on it.
http://www.autotrader.ca/used_cars_Car_details/WATERLOO_Ontario_2009_CADILLAC_CTS-V_1810042.html?srcID=5&frnID=7959921&cofid=ON20070802094616106&prv=Ontario&r=40

The bottom line is that it is still significantly more costly to buy the car in Canada, even with the close proximity of our currencies. List on my car was $81,735 incl. the $1420 frt. and $100 A/C tax. Every option except wood. We don't have a "gas guzzler" tax, but we do pay a $400 'green tax" on the V (manual & auto). And the auto is a $1700 option on the car in Canada.

You can price it out on GM Canada's website - just pick CTS rather than 2011 CTS.
http://configurator.autodata.gm.ca/GMCanada/modelSelect.html?lang=en&model=&package=&brand=6&year=2010&access=0&lastsavedconfig=

Best regards,

Elie

nynd
06-27-10, 11:22 AM
I had the same experience - Canadian dealers are not to discount friendly! I think they are due to them being in very short supply.

oneman42
06-27-10, 01:11 PM
I imported a brand new Tribeca back in 2008 from Seattle and saved about $20000. I think it's the time again to look south the bordure. When imported I think the CTS-V will qualify for the gas guzzler tax.
HTH,
Oneman42

newcadman
06-27-10, 09:59 PM
And yes, I saved OVER $10,000 by shopping south of the border in january of this year and bought a fully loaded GM executive driven V for $53,900 with 6000 miles on it!
The reality is, there are significant savings and deals to be had by looking south of the border. You just have to look.
Why anyone would waste there time and effort attempting to deal with these Canadian dealerships who are apparently unwilling to deal( due to limited allotment or whatever else excuse is beyond me.
A word to the wise for those NORTH OF THE BORDER, get your best negotiated Canadian price (even Elie's suggested GM Canada Employee Pricing Event price), then do yourself a favor and search carefully and patiently south of the border.
You maybe surprised and save $$$$ in the process!

Vlakaz
06-29-10, 10:51 AM
I agree with looking south of the border if you are looking for a used car. The used market in the US does provide deals that you just can't find up here in Canada. A buddy of mine buys a used car from the states every 2 or 3 years and brings it up.

We pay more for almost everything up here, compared to south of the border regardless of exchange rate. Thats just how it has always been.

and yes, the $1700 for the auto I paid was ridiculous... I think it is still a no charge option for the states.

As far as availability of the V up here... the dealer near me has 4 or 5 V's sitting on the lot, one is infact a very very early 09 build that they still haven't sold.

I wonder how many 09+ V's have been sold in Canada so far. I've seen a black one, a silver and a white one over the past year and a half.

sybersport
06-29-10, 01:49 PM
I agree with looking south of the border if you are looking for a used car. The used market in the US does provide deals that you just can't find up here in Canada. A buddy of mine buys a used car from the states every 2 or 3 years and brings it up.

We pay more for almost everything up here, compared to south of the border regardless of exchange rate. Thats just how it has always been.

and yes, the $1700 for the auto I paid was ridiculous... I think it is still a no charge option for the states.

As far as availability of the V up here... the dealer near me has 4 or 5 V's sitting on the lot, one is infact a very very early 09 build that they still haven't sold.

I wonder how many 09+ V's have been sold in Canada so far. I've seen a black one, a silver and a white one over the past year and a half.

Can you provide the name / contact info for the dealer?

caddynoob
06-29-10, 05:28 PM
Few things to keep in mind.

1. It is my understanding that US dealers will not sell you a new one south of the border. If any dealer in the US is interested in doing business, please pm me. New or slightly used one.

2. According to APA.ca. For a new car imported from US, the car cannot register for warranty during the first 6 month with GM. I am not entirely sure about used cars that's still under warranty though. I am also interested in the GT500, Ford Canada will warranty that right away.

3. The Canadian cars comes with 4 year 80k free scheduled maintenance plan. Honestly, I am not sure if I want these GM tech to touch my car anyways.

4. Generally you can NOT get financing when you buy from south of the border. I am a cash buyer so I have no problem with that.

5. The used car price on the V seems a bit high. GT500 on the other hand, is much more reasonable.

Honestly I shopped around Canada and I just cannot swallow the US/Canada price differential at about 10k for a new V. I have pretty much decided to shop south of the border and plan a hell of a road trip driving home.

If anyone got other tips to share about buying from US. Please share with us.

sybersport
06-29-10, 06:22 PM
Taken from a thread on RedFlagDeals.com

There are many articles in the press (http://www.torontosun.com/Money/2006...46786-sun.html) or even on television (http://drivingtv.canada.com/) that mention that new car prices are considerably cheaper in the US. In some cases up to 40% cheaper. Most are about 20% cheaper. When the Minister of Finance says Canadian cars are overpriced you know something's up:
http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...391821-cp.html

There are dealers in Canada who also agree and (lucky for smart consumers like those reading this thread) are starting to feel it on their ledger sheets:

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/f...75d453&k=77254

For a couple of hours of paperwork (www.riv.ca) you could save THOUSANDS of dollars. Anywhere from $8000 to $15000 on a $30,000 car.

For example, check out Subaru pricing from this dealer in the US then compare it to Canada:

http://www.cars101.com/subaru_prices.html

http://www.cars101.com/canada.html

Unless the car is very hot and desirable (like a new model or extremely popular) The vast majority of buyers pay WELL BELOW invoice (not MSRP). You also qualify for the US rebates (if offered) and other incentives that typically drop the invoice price thousands less than invoice.



Edit: I have since purchased a 2007 Subaru Outback in Buffalo NY personally saving almost $20,000! The price of my car was almost $2000 off posted invoice price.

Contrary to what a Canadian car dealer might tell you, almost ANY car can be imported regardless of it's age. The process is very simple. There's very little paperwork to do. Ask around, you'll be surprised how many people are doing this. The press has taken note, the Canadian car companies are quietly telling some of their US dealers NOT to sell to Canadians since the savings are quite dramatic. Check out the US invoice prices online for free. Many of us are getting cars for LESS than invoice. Canadian dealers insist on working backwards from the MSRP which is ALWAYS thousands more.

Since many of us have done this, we've taken it upon ourselves to spread the word. Thanks to RFD member "Michelb" for helping compile this FAQ:


IMPORTING A CAR FROM THE USA INTO CANADA FAQ
--------------------------------------------

1) Why bother importing a car from the US?

- Partially of the recent strength of the Canadian dollar, many models are significantly less expensive in the US than in Canada. Also some models/trims are available in the US but not in Canada.


2) Can any car from the USA be imported?

- No, check the list at www.riv.ca. While many cars can be imported without any or with very little modifications, some might need modifications like the addition of Daytime running lights, and/or child tether anchors

3) Do I have to pay duty and taxes?

- There is no duty on cars built in North America. Cars from elsewhere will be charged 6.1% duty. You have to pay GST when you import the vehicle and PST when you register your vehicle as per your Province's regulations.


4) How do I know if I can import a car without paying duty?

- If the VIN starts with a number, it's made in North America and can be imported duty free. If they VIN starts with a letter, it's made elsewhere in the world and you will be charged 6.1% duty.


5) IS this only for new cars?

- Any car that can be imported (check point #1) can be imported new or used - does not make any difference and the process is the same (other than things like safety checks and clean air checks which really have nothing to do with importing the car).


6) Will the new car warranty be valid in Canada?

- This varies by manufacturer and you should contact the one for the car you wish to import. Some manufacturers (e.g. Subaru, Toyota) will honor the warranty, others will honor the warranty but under a few conditions (e.g. Nissan), while others void the warranty if the car is not registered in the US first (e.g. Honda)


7) Do I need a US address?

- No, but some dealerships (e.g. Toyota, particularly those near the Canadian border) may not want to sell you a car if you don't register it in the US first. In general dealerships very close to the Canadian border may not be as willing (because of pressure from the manufacturer) to sell to Canadians and you may have to travel further South.


8) I have a friend / relative / whatever with an address in the US, can I or they buy the car in the US and register it there before importing it to Canada?

- Yes but you may be charged sales taxes in the US and in Canada if you do that. Different states have different tax rates (and some none) so it may be possible to do it there. It has been confirmed that Canadian buyers pay NO sales tax in certain states like New York but are charged sales tax in Michigan. Also, there are certain conditions under which Customs Canada will allow you to import the car without paying taxes but this is only for those who are out of Canada for extended periods of time.


9) Can I get financing for a car purchased in the US?

- You cannot get financing through the dealership or manufacturer. You may be able to get a car loan from your bank but probably only once the vehicle is imported into Canada. Some Canadian banks are now offering US loans.


10) Can anyone do this for me?

- There are importers / brokers that will handle shipping and importing however they do charge a significant amount. Individuals can do it for themselve for the cost of a few hours time and the $200 RIV fee.


11) Are there any drawbacks from having a US car?

- Generally no. There are some inconveniences such as having an odometer in miles rather than kilometers and having the 'principal' display (outer ring) in the speedometer in MPH rather than KPH. It may be more difficult to resell an 'US' vehicle and you may get less for it. Dealer supplied bonuses (e.g. free oil changes for the first year) are usually not valid in Canada. Some automatic climate control and computer data information can also be in Imperial measurements. Some vehicles can easily switch between Imperial and Metric measurements while others cannot.


12) What should I pay for my car? What's fair? How to I compare?

This is a complicated question but if you're reading this you have the most valuable tool available to you. It's called THE INTERNET. Unlike Canada, the US readily promotes competition. While most manufacturers indicate a MSRP (Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price) most automobiles in the US are sold based on "invoice" pricing. This is closer to the true value of the car. This information is readily available on the Internet. The theory behind this is to ensure that a dealer in Iowa can sell a car for roughly the same price as one in LA. Unfortunately the fact of the matter is that large volume dealers also get additional discounts and incentives. Some could get free transmissions or moonroofs from the manufacturer. The dealer may choose to charge you for those items and keep it as straight profit. Others will discount the price accordingly.

In very rare cases, the car is so popular it exceeds demand. In those cases, the consumer might have to pay above invoice. If you can't get a car for US invoice price, shop around. Call dealers in other cities or states to get an idea what others are paying. Excellent sites like Edmunds.com have forums where "prices paid" are discussed.

Many of the RFDers compare prices the following way: Use US "invoice pricing" as the starting point. Add the exchange and a thousand or so dollars. Offer that to the Canadian dealer. NEVER compare US MSRP to Canadian MSRP unless you're researching prices. There is no doubt there is a price disparity in Canada. Many Canadian dealers will use all kinds of arguments to mislead you. There is a Canadian automotive analyst who is an expert at deception. They'll point out that model and trim levels aren't the same so true comparisons are not possible and that no real price disparity exists. Unfortunately for him, with the Internet at your disposal, you can compare options to options. This price disparity is huge and is now the subject of a $2 Billion dollar lawsuit filed in Canada in September, 2007.

Don't let taxation get into the discussion. You're paying taxes regardless of where you buy. Lucky for the Canadian buyer purchasing down south, your overall tax bill will be significantly reduced since the initial cost of the car is lower.

You'll be told that the cars aren't compliant and that "thousands" need to be spent to conform your car. Leave that the Transport Canada to decide. RIV.ca will tell you what needs to be done to the car. In the vast majority of cases, very little or in the case of many cars like the Subaru Outback NOTHING is required.

Dealers will tell you the Canadian market is small and can't support the US pricing. Another good one is that the cars in Canada are competitively priced in the market. That's the whole point of the lawsuit. There appears to be some collusion going on. There is an allegation that many Canadian car manufacturers have agreed to keep their prices artificially high.

This information is supplied to the best of our knowledge, if you have any recommendations or corrections please let us know.


Okay now you're convinced to buy in the US. How do you do it?

Follow the import instructions posted at the Registrar Of Imported Vehicles. http://www.riv.ca/english/html/how_to_import.html. It's easier than it sounds.

Another excellent resource is the RFD thread compiled by alysomji with input from just about everyone: http://www.redflagdeals.com/forums/s...d.php?t=477998

Thanks to another RFD member, we made a wiki site at www.carburner.com

If you have any questions, ask some of the members at RFD who've gone through the process.