: Proper inflation?



ESCALADE132
06-23-10, 03:38 PM
I hear alot of differant numbers, what should the tires be set at. I have a Escalade with factory 22's on it
Thanks

StevieT
06-23-10, 04:08 PM
Look at your door wall, there is a sticker that will recommend tire pressures, probably says 35 front and rear. I like to go with what is on the tire. Mine can go up to 44 so I set at 40 psi with nitrogen. With a truck, higher the better in most cases, less side wall wear.

evois
06-23-10, 07:50 PM
I put 36psi front and 37psi rears when traveling and normally 36psi on all 4's.

2007caddy
06-23-10, 10:45 PM
Inflate with Nitrogen and your inflating tire days are over

North49
06-23-10, 11:01 PM
Look at your door wall, there is a sticker that will recommend tire pressures, probably says 35 front and rear. I like to go with what is on the tire. Mine can go up to 44 so I set at 40 psi with nitrogen. With a truck, higher the better in most cases, less side wall wear.

I agree with the concept of higher tire pressures. After some discussion with a tactical driving instructor, I was convinced that the high (max capacity of over) tire pressures will increase tire life and vehicle stability. The downside is that the tire will then transmit more road vibrations to the cabin and create a more harsh ride.

Most of the police members that Marin had in his class had vehicles using nothing less than 55 psi in a 44 psi rated tire. The concept of tactical driving at these tire pressures is based on vehicle stability in pursuit conditions. Probably a little different from our daily driving technique. :)

hcvone
06-24-10, 09:03 AM
Over inflation is just as bad as under inflation and causes as many accidents

Ronin
06-24-10, 10:12 AM
Over inflation is just as bad as under inflation and causes as many accidents

Exactly! NEVER exceed the maximum stated PSI on the sidewall; and the fact that the PD is doing that would expose itself to significant liability in the event of a crash resulting from a pursuit, etc. I'm no attorney, and don't pretend to be one on the internet, but I do know a little something about EVOC ;) and can tell you that's bullocks...

Over inflation will result in a loss of contact patch, which would compromise handling especially at higher speeds. The wear (and tear) on the crown/peak of the tire would be much higher than the rest of the tire, and no matter how you slice and dice it, that's an all around losing scenario regardless of the driving scenario, be it "tactical" or everyday "civilian"...

Making the tires solid as bricks takes away from the suspensions ability to do its job, which likewise goes against both conventional/"civilian" and "tactical" wisdom...why do all those "police packages" have upgraded shocks, springs, (anti) sway-bars in addition to brakes, etc. anyway???

Like Colonel Cooper said, just because you have a piano in your living room doesn't make you a pianist, and just because you have a gun on your hip doesn't make you a gunfighter, ergo just because you have a "pursuit" (which is really a politically incorrect term these days in LEO circles for the most part) vehicle doesn't make you a "wheelman"...

I'm completely intrigued by this "tactical driving instructor's" credentials, particularly whether he's a civilian himself (like a Skip Barber instructor for example) or whether he's a gun and badge type himself...makes a HUGE difference...

StevieT
06-24-10, 11:20 AM
Probably a little different from our daily driving technique. :)

Hey you never know what you have to run from with an Escalade :histeric:

Gigantor
06-24-10, 12:18 PM
Inflate with Nitrogen and your inflating tire days are over


:thumbsup:

WaterKing
06-24-10, 12:36 PM
Since many people change the tires/wheels and the ambient temperature in various locations is different why couldn't a Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer with Laser Targeting such as the inexpensive Kintrex IRT0421 (about $45) be used to measure the temperature across the tire surface. If the vehicle has been driven to about 60MPH in a straight line for about 10 min or so and you pulled over and measured at about four places across the tire in a straight line you would know if the center is a different temperature than the edges...Lower/increase the tire pressure a few lbs and repeat until it is even across the tire (but not shoulder) and then you have equal tread pattern contact across the tire which should be the optimal pressure for that tire/wheel under those ambient conditions. Check back tire also to see if there is a difference. Do again in the winter and you have a generalized tire pressure for that season. Use nitrogen filling to maximize consistency. Isn't that how the racing industry evaluates tire pressures and suspension changes? The best part is all the OTHER uses the device can be used for when not taking tire temps. Great toy.

Tec80
06-24-10, 07:56 PM
Air is already 78% Nitrogen. Put some magnets on the fuel line, splitfire plugs in the heads, prolong oil treatment in the crankcase, a K&N filter in the airbox.....all the same snake oil BS....and in some cases (prolong and K&N) actually cause harm.

North49
06-25-10, 12:35 AM
I'm completely intrigued by this "tactical driving instructor's" credentials, particularly whether he's a civilian himself (like a Skip Barber instructor for example) or whether he's a gun and badge type himself...makes a HUGE difference...

Thanks for your insights. As for his "credentials" I have no idea. As for his history, he teaches tactical driving techniques in driving schools all over North America. Somebody pays him and he travels lots.

Just passing along information he gave me about what he teaches about tire inflation and vehicle handling. If he slows down long enough to stop and talk, I will ask him where he developed his theory and how he supports it other than practical high speed experience on race tracks. :hide:

Ronin
06-25-10, 09:28 AM
Thanks for your insights. As for his "credentials" I have no idea. As for his history, he teaches tactical driving techniques in driving schools all over North America. Somebody pays him and he travels lots.

Just passing along information he gave me about what he teaches about tire inflation and vehicle handling. If he slows down long enough to stop and talk, I will ask him where he developed his theory and how he supports it other than practical high speed experience on race tracks. :hide:

No worries North, no beef with you obviously, just my interest is piqued.

Practical high speed experience on race tracks does not equal "the street"...so 'nuff said about that...

I have a direct connection (through a business associate) to some engineering types at Goodyear. As you may recall, they're rather sensitive to issues involving tire pressure, but I wouldn't want to bother them for something like this, especially since it seems rather ridiculous on its face value...

I threw a call into a buddy whose an instructor at the local police academy that's running right now. They're a very large department (several hundred sworn) and they have their own stand alone academy. He does firearms/tactics but I asked him to reach out to the EVOC instructors for their opinion...(he chuckled a little when I told him why)...should be interesting.

We (him and I) and other LEOs/military-types always find civilian experts interesting to say the least. Unless they've worn the uniform and/or strapped on a gun/badge most operators only interest in "specialized" training is getting out of whatever is was they would have been normally doing that day. For instance, no one in their right mind would turn down a few days in Phoenix beating the ever loving snot out of a C6 Vette @ Bondurant's school but LEOs/military are typically cynical types and aren't going to change what they're doing overnight, especially when they're told by someone whose never done the job before that "they're doing it wrong..."

That doesn't mean that agencies don't know any better either. There's sure some super sexy website and videos out there that have them lining up and paying big bucks, but there's no way you're gonna get an entire police department to shoot like Rob Leatham or Jerry "The Burner" Barnhart, especially with 20+ pounds of duty gear on and a metric ton of adrenaline going through them too. I'm sure IPSC matches can get very tense, but that would pale in comparison to responding to a shots fired, officer down call...

As much as I hate the term, some of this stuff is just "a tool for the toolbox" and until it's thoroughly vetted in the real world/street successfully, it's just theory and a hot topic for (internet!) debate... :want:

WaterKing
06-25-10, 10:48 AM
Thank you Tech80 for your comment on use of nitrogen fills but I do disagree about the snake oil connotation. Maybe not cost effective...definitely a factor with the gouging being done by some providers. The arguments both pro and con are overwhelming, passionate, and inconsistent.....But the usual bottom line results seem to be that the cost benefit is negligible for the user who maintains proper air pressure. That is NOT the average user but it might be true for the ones who usually frequent these forums. Commercial benefits of N2 fills are proven and mandated in many industries.

I do it for MYSELF because: 1. IMHO it is not the N2 that is important-- its is the displacement of contaminants and particularly moisture reduction by the clean N2 fill that is pertinent. Any user of an air compressor would know the amount of water vapor that compressed air can have by the water dribbling across their hand out of the fittings while they use air tools. Water vapor is proven to create greater pressure deviations under temperature change than any other component introduced during filling. If I lived in Arizona/Nevada this might not be as important. 2. Gas station compressors/my compressor/portable compressors usually have no or ineffective driers and filters. 3. It is documented that tires with N2 fills vary less during temperature changes and lose less pressure over time. Proving why is not important to me. Would I pay the ridiculous prices charged by some? NO! But since it is available to me for <$5 per wheel I do it and recommend that anyone who thinks the cost/benefit acceptable to them do it as well. That was my BAD, but they are MY reasons. It's like the synth/dino debate.

Debate aside, keeping the correct air pressure for the tire/wheel/vehicle/conditions is more important than what you fill it with. I was really trying to find out if anyone was using temperature reading devices to derive what that pressure should be for their conditions since that could vary so greatly. I think it unlikely that my 305/45R24 FALKEN ZIEX S/TZ 04's would need the same pressure as the stock 22's and was hoping hvcone would chip in because he has had many similar vehicles with apparently different tire wheel configurations and would like to know if they required different pressures and how he resolved it.

WaterKing
06-25-10, 11:33 AM
Escalade132, sorry, did not mean to thread jack.....on my 2008 EXT with 22" Bridgestones, I use 35 front/36 rear COLD. Goes to 37 all around after driving. No uneven wear after 15k miles.