: Ever seen an Inline-Eight?



I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-14-09, 08:27 PM
Well I got to see one today! This is a '52 Buick Special Sport Coupe. It has a 263 CID (4.3L) I-8....it's one of the first year for OHV I-8's in Buick, and it's mated up to a three speed on the column. It's rated at 128hp, which isn't much, but the owner says it's awfully smooth and torquey, as I'd imagine an inline eight would be. 1952 was the last year Buick offered the inline eight in all their cars, and by 1953, they only offered the I-8 in their base Special series. By 1954 the I-8 was all but eradicated in Buick.

Neat stuff. The guy who owns this owns a small shop north of Cannon Falls that I sell to.

http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j313/Chadillac8705/IMG_1212.jpg
http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j313/Chadillac8705/IMG_1213-1.jpg

Stingroo
12-14-09, 08:31 PM
That's pretty awesome. That's one of the lower-end Specials (as indicated by the three portholes, instead of four), but still an absolutely epic find.

I think Packard had straight-eights in some of their cars too. Really cool stuff.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-14-09, 08:39 PM
Here's what I found on the straight eight, as far as the last years each company stopped production.

Buick-1953
Chrysler-1950
Dodge-1933
Oldsmobile-1948
Packard-1954
Pontiac-1954

itschrome
12-14-09, 09:08 PM
only I-8 i ever had the privilege of encountering was in a 1935 Duesenberg Convertible SJ LA Grand Dual-Cowl Phaeton, supercharged and good for 320hp. I use to volunteer at the Northeast Classic Car Museum in Norwich NY when I was 15. never got to ride in it though. Heard it fired up once. sweet music for the soul, that i can tell yeah. Seeing how it worth something like 2mil they dont take it out very much. damn shame as that is one pimp ass ride. i got to wax her up real nice though, It was my job to keep the whole collection there looking good.

http://www.truckchamp.com/jlh/article_images/800px-Duesenberg_Convertible_SJ_LA_Grand_Dual-Cowl_Phaeton_1935.jpg
that a pic i just googled not the from the museum, same color though.

Submariner409
12-14-09, 10:21 PM
Sheesh ! You guys should have been around to tinker with a Lincoln Zephyr V-12 flathead with 4 cylinder heads.......The thing ran so smooth you could sit a glass of water on the engine top and nary a ripple........:rolleyes: 4 and 5 speed declutching manual transmissions, floor stick. Take your foot off the gas, complete disconnect from the engine. Would coast forever. Manual knob choke on the dashboard. Mechanical spark advance on the steering wheel. Real mechanical engine gauges. NO idiot lights. NO fuel gauge. Ford flathead - distributor driven horizontally off the front of the cam. Packard 440 unshielded ignition wire. 25 cent spark plugs. Backing a Cadillac hearse into the parking place at the drive-in movies (heh, heh........). $2400 Chevelle Malibu SS, fully tricked out 327 c.i./350 hp 4 spd posi, new, on the showroom floor in 1965. Pontiac GTO 389 Tri-Power, same tricks, $2950. 0-100-0 in <22 seconds McLaren/Elva/ Traco Chevy 327.

(GTO = a 1950's/1960's European standard requiring 100 (?) 200 (?) identical cars manufactured in order to qualify for the Gran Turismo Omologato badge in road racing. Bastardized by the American Pontiac "GTO") GTO means absolutely nothing now, like CTS, XLR, other clones.

OP, second picture - see the black domed thingy by the top radiator hose? That's the case for the drop-in cotton oil filter element. Very close to a roll of toilet paper. Talk about a bitch to change without dripping oil all over the place. The air filter is an oil bath unit: the entire lower case had a cup of oil in it - air came in the middle annular opening, dropped straight down to the oil surface and made a 180 degree turn up into the intake tube. The idea was to cause particles in the incoming air to "skid" out of the airstream into the oil due to the sudden direction change. Hah !!! You think K&N filters suck ?

codewize
12-14-09, 11:05 PM
Which is interesting because in modern day Buicks, the number of ports indicates the number of cylinders.

I thought it always did. I wonder when that changed?

That's pretty awesome. That's one of the lower-end Specials (as indicated by the three portholes, instead of four), but still an absolutely epic find.

I think Packard had straight-eights in some of their cars too. Really cool stuff.

Kick94sts
12-14-09, 11:21 PM
Where's cannon falls located from the cities?

Stingroo
12-14-09, 11:48 PM
No, in the old days, the higher ended vehicles always had four portholes. They were special. The portholes of today are bastardized just like the GTO name from Pontiac. :(

I love the older Buicks though. My uncle has a '62 (I believe) Buick Special. It's a gorgeous car, fully restored, and turns heads literally EVERYWHERE it goes.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-15-09, 12:50 AM
Where's cannon falls located from the cities?

About a half hour south of the cities on HWY 52, or halfway between Rochester and Inver Grove Heights.

Kick94sts
12-15-09, 02:04 AM
Ah, quite aways from me then, lol.

dkozloski
12-15-09, 02:09 AM
FWIW. All Buicks of all years clear back to the first ever built are valve in head. The first year for the Buick in-line 8 was 1931. The previous engine was an inline six that became the famous GMC 270/302 6 cyl.
A notable year was 1941. Buick featured the Dual carburetor Century that was guaranteed to go 100MPH. Buick was a very highly regarded stock car racer in the 30s, 40s, and 50s.

ga_etc
12-15-09, 02:36 AM
Even if it's not the highest model, that '52 Buick is a very good looking car. I would love to see how it turns out when he is finished with it.

EcSTSatic
12-15-09, 11:15 AM
The Roadmasters had 4 portals per side.

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/1950-1952-buick-roadmaster-1.jpg

Stingroo
12-15-09, 11:45 AM
Correctomundo. Not to mention looked absolutely gorgeous. :drool:

concorso
12-15-09, 03:01 PM
No, in the old days, the higher ended vehicles always had four portholes. They were special. The portholes of today are bastardized just like the GTO name from Pontiac. :(

I love the older Buicks though. My uncle has a '62 (I believe) Buick Special. It's a gorgeous car, fully restored, and turns heads literally EVERYWHERE it goes.The new Lucerne uses a Porthole per cylinder...whats wrong with that?

On top of this, Buick wasnt the first to use portholes...

dkozloski
12-15-09, 04:15 PM
Pontiac stole the GTO name in the first place. It was initially a class designation by FIA rule makers and was an acronym for Gran Turismo Omologato; conforming to Grand Touring class. The most famous and desirable GTO was the Ferrari GTO. An authentic Ferrari GTO sells for a price in the multi-millions. I've never heard of a Pontiac that could match that.

orconn
12-15-09, 04:38 PM
I've always loved the sound and smoothness of a straight eight. That's what I always like about my Dad's Packards
I do remember the Buick straight eights with Dyno-flow sounded sluggish. Alfa-Romeo also used the straight eight cofiguration in some of their GP and race cars. I quess the main draw back for the engine was the length of its block and its' weight, both of which exceeded a v-8. Maybe Sub or dkoz could tell us more why the straight eight lost favor. I remeber those big senior series Packards of the 1950's were really smooth and quiet ... a perfect combination for a true luxury sedan.

sven914
12-15-09, 04:46 PM
Straight 8?

How about a V-16?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/91/Cadillac452engine.jpg/724px-Cadillac452engine.jpg

http://www.sigbrokers.com/images/1930-Cadillac-V16-Phaeton.jpg

orconn
12-15-09, 05:40 PM
^^^ Actually my first step father had a coupe version of the V-16 Cadillac pictured above. Even though the car was a year old when he got it as payment for a debt he really didn't think that highly of the car. He said it was very cumbersome around town, but went like a train when he used it to inspect his investments in the California deserts. If I remember correctly, I think he told me his favorite car of that era was his Jordan Playboy. The old gentleman lived to be 103 years old and bought his last new car in 1968 an Olds Toronado fully loaded!

dkozloski
12-15-09, 06:16 PM
I've always loved the sound and smoothness of a straight eight. That's what I always like about my Dad's Packards
I do remember the Buick straight eights with Dyno-flow sounded sluggish. Alfa-Romeo also used the straight eight cofiguration in some of their GP and race cars. I quess the main draw back for the engine was the length of its block and its' weight, both of which exceeded a v-8. Maybe Sub or dkoz could tell us more why the straight eight lost favor. I remeber those big senior series Packards of the 1950's were really smooth and quiet ... a perfect combination for a true luxury sedan.
Long flexible crankshaft, hard to cool all the cylinders evenly, poor fuel distribution in the long manifold, lubrication problems, lack of stiffness with the long crankcase; to name a few.