: Aldi is crazy cheap.



Jesda
11-28-09, 05:57 PM
http://www.q45.org/cpg/albums/userpics/10001/normal_100_5431.jpg

Subtract the frozen pizza and paper towels and its just over $50 for a crapton of food. The only nuisance is having to remember to bring a quarter to get a shopping cart. Plastic bags cost a nickel so I make sure to bring post office mail tubs. They're much easier to load in the car than bags anyway.

itschrome
11-28-09, 06:14 PM
yeah i went through the Aldi phase as well. how ever what i found out over time is i actually make out better shopping using coupons and only buying weekly specials at my local grocery store. not to mention the quality of the product is better when shopping sales/coupons.

dirt_cheap_fleetwood
11-28-09, 06:15 PM
I stopped buying stuff at Aldi when I came across "Artificially processed cheese food" that looked like Kraft Singles, but God only knows what was actually processed in there.

Jesda
11-28-09, 06:28 PM
I stopped buying stuff at Aldi when I came across "Artificially processed cheese food" that looked like Kraft Singles, but God only knows what was actually processed in there.

I hate "cheese food". Blech.

LS1Mike
11-28-09, 07:18 PM
We have Grocery Outlet! I loved that place when I was divorced and saving money for alcohol.
Some of the cereal was like weird runs of lucky Charms written in Spanish. I saved lots of money shopping there.

Rolex
11-28-09, 07:26 PM
There was a blurb on ABC nightly news a couple weeks ago about how well Aldi has done in the recession. Everything in the store is generic, no bags, carts cost money to use, minimal personnel to work in the store, all of which create low overhead and deliver goods to the consumer at lower cost. All the above has caused their stock to rise while chain grocery stores are laying people off and cutting back.

The financial gurus believe Aldi's business will return to it's normal dismal levels when we're past the recession.

c5 rv
11-28-09, 08:19 PM
With our usual weekly shopping, I save $25/week by shopping at Meijer (a midwest hypermarket) over chain grocery stores. I save another $25/week by shopping at Wal-Mart over Meijer. I used to avoid WM, but one of my past neighbors got a job as pharmacy manager there. When WM opened a new super center, I started shopping there.

I like going to Aldi for the European chocolates. I have to hide them from my wife.

BIG ERN
11-28-09, 08:49 PM
i,m an Aldi convert never had any bad food or anything and the prices are great they get my money every week what little i have

ga_etc
11-29-09, 02:05 AM
I'm curious to what the "flavored wraps" are?

Jesda
11-29-09, 04:09 AM
I'm curious to what the "flavored wraps" are?

Just some standard wheat wraps. Think of them as tortillas for white people.

hardrockcamaro@mac.c
11-29-09, 06:51 AM
I had no idea Aldi was in the US too.

They hit the UK back when I stated college, so around 95.

They were very cheap, even getting involved in price wars with the big UK supermarkets like Tesco over simple stuff like baked beans (4p or 6c per can in Aldi) or a loaf of bread.

The fruit and veg is fine, some of the refrigerated meat stuff is pretty good.
The refrigerated pizza bases were like cardboard though, and stuff like Bakes Beans was not as good as Heinz with somewhat tougher beans in a much more watery tomato sauce. Anything dough or pastry based was not so good.

As for the processed cheese food, all cheese singles are processed cheese that taste nothing like proper cheese and are only fit for putting on burgers imho. No way would I put cheese singles on a sandwich or something.

hueterm
11-29-09, 11:06 AM
You have to decide if you want to use your quarter for a shopping cart, or the pay toilet.

Some weekend when I'm bored, I'm going to take a handful of quarters and unlock all the shopping carts in the parking lot 5 min. before they close and then watch while the one employee at the cash register has to round them all up >:-0

ga_etc
11-29-09, 11:44 AM
Just some standard wheat wraps. Think of them as tortillas for white people.

Gotcha. The gas station I work at has flavored wraps but they're used for consumption with "tobacco".

eldorado99
11-29-09, 02:59 PM
Pork Ass Chops? ;)

DILLIGAF
11-29-09, 08:35 PM
I went through an Aldi stage myself.Canned green Beans are blems,extra stemmy,cut weird and more water in can than the popular brands.Their spaghetio's just plain suck,ravioli not much better.I don't feel Aldis is any cheaper than Wallmart if you watch the sale ads.However,Aldis is like Dollar General,both very good companys who are very in tune with their customers,and they both will continue to kick ass in this economy!

Stingroo
11-29-09, 09:24 PM
Why are there two different sales tax rates on your bill?

And food has sales tax in your state?

Aron9000
11-30-09, 12:23 AM
Why are there two different sales tax rates on your bill?

And food has sales tax in your state?

The food on his bill was taxed at the cheaper rate, he probably bought one "non-food" item that was taxed at the higher rate.

In Tennessee, sales tax is 9.25-9.75% depending on which county you are in. Grocieries are taxed at that rate as well. We still have an income tax as well, but it only taxes investment income, not your wages.

westons
11-30-09, 12:23 AM
There building one of these near my house and I plan to check it out after it opens. Im always open to saving a buck.

Stingroo
11-30-09, 12:30 AM
See, that's weird. Food isn't taxed in Florida at all, as far as I know. And our sales tax is 6.5% (or 7% in Duval county, where I just so happen to attend college).

orconn
11-30-09, 12:52 AM
Sales tax on food is travesty and a disproportionate tax on those of moderate income and larger families. When I moved to good old conservative, anti-tax Virginia I was flabbergasted to learn that there was a state sales tax on food. Even good old "tax till they scream" California doesn't have sales tax on food. It doesn't say much for the educational system in Virginia that the state legislators couldn't understand what was in a law that allowed those least able (of which there are plenty in the state of Virginia) to have a very disproportional percent of their income to be taxed while those who could well afford to pay were taxed at a very nominal rate in comparison. I have heard the merits of a flat rate tax touted, well here you have a flat rate tax on a basic commodity of life and I defy anyone to justify why one family should be taxed at 5% of their income while another family pays less than 1% of their income food food.

Stingroo
11-30-09, 12:59 AM
I agree, sales tax on food IS wrong. Honestly, I never even knew ANY state had it. I've lived in three (Florida, Maine, Taxachusetts ;)) and none of them have tax on food.

hardrockcamaro@mac.c
11-30-09, 04:31 AM
In the UK our "sales tax" is 15% and is only applied to luxury food items.
So meat, veg etc is not taxed, but nuts and chocolate are.

Stingroo
11-30-09, 02:28 PM
15%?! Wow. I can add that there to reasons I'm never moving to England. LOL

Jonas McFeely
11-30-09, 03:56 PM
See, that's weird. Food isn't taxed in Florida at all, as far as I know. And our sales tax is 6.5% (or 7% in Duval county, where I just so happen to attend college).


It depends on the county. Most counties in Florida have a food tax. The only thing not taxed that im aware of is bottled water, fruit juice, and certain domestic fruits and vegetables. I live in Seminole county, and this also applies to Orange county.

Also, sales tax is determined on a county-by-county basis. We have 67 counties. There's a lot of fluctuation, obviously. Seminole county sales tax is 7%, while Orange's is 8%. Alcohol laws vary by county as well. In Volusia county, you can buy a 30-pack of beer, but not in most other counties. In Dade county, you can buy liquor 23 hours a day. In most other counties its only 18 hours a day.

Florida laws are screwy and rarely uniform throughout the state.

Stingroo
11-30-09, 04:04 PM
Ah. Well I've lived in (so far):

St. Lucie
Martin
Broward
Duval

I know that food isn't taxed in those at least, I assumed that was state wide. Our whole state is screwy though, I'm afraid. lol And I never knew about the liquor thing. That's even weirder. Definitely explains a lot of the bad drivers in Miami now though. And I've seen those 30 packs of beer too. My grandparents used to live in DeLand, and my uncle too, and he always had his budweiser.

Hooray, I have learned something today.

Jonas McFeely
11-30-09, 04:07 PM
Ah. Well I've lived in (so far):

St. Lucie
Martin
Broward
Duval

I know that food isn't taxed in those at least, I assumed that was state wide. Our whole state is screwy though, I'm afraid. lol And I never knew about the liquor thing. That's even weirder. Definitely explains a lot of the bad drivers in Miami now though. And I've seen those 30 packs of beer too. My grandparents used to live in DeLand, and my uncle too, and he always had his budweiser.

Hooray, I have learned something today.

Glad i could be of some service. :thumbsup:

hardrockcamaro@mac.c
11-30-09, 05:30 PM
15%?! Wow. I can add that there to reasons I'm never moving to England. LOL

It used to be 17.5% sales tax, but they lowered it to 15% for a year or so to try and help the retail sector during the recession. It goes back up to 17.5% in January...

Jesda
11-30-09, 08:56 PM
How are the sales taxes in Canada? I heard they could be quite high.

Missouri is a mixed bag as far as taxes and government burdens, which I guess is what happens when you live in a swing state. You sometimes get the worst of both sides.

V-Eight
11-30-09, 09:22 PM
5% Federal (GST), Provincial sales tax (PST) varies (here in Manitoba its 7% for a total of 12%). I'm pretty sure its worse in the maritimes as they have HST on top of that. Alberta is lucky as hell because they only pay GST

Stingroo
11-30-09, 10:37 PM
My girlfriend is from Nova Scotia, and she said it was like 19% or something like that.

...I told her I was never shopping there, ever. lol

Eric Kahn
11-30-09, 11:49 PM
Subtract the frozen pizza and paper towels and its just over $50 for a crapton of food. The only nuisance is having to remember to bring a quarter to get a shopping cart. Plastic bags cost a nickel so I make sure to bring post office mail tubs. They're much easier to load in the car than bags anyway.

remember you have to send me the postal employee 44 cents for every time you use the postal tub for carry stuff other than mail :bouncy:

eldorado99
12-01-09, 12:55 AM
The real problem with Canadian taxes isn't so much with the sales tax (which is not exactly low either) its all of the other taxes we have which are also way too high, thats what we get for having "free" healthcare I suppose.

Jesda
12-01-09, 01:04 AM
remember you have to send me the postal employee 44 cents for every time you use the postal tub for carry stuff other than mail :bouncy:

I send my respect and appreciation, which is priceless and often in short supply. :D

Stingroo
12-01-09, 02:28 AM
The real problem with Canadian taxes isn't so much with the sales tax (which is not exactly low either) its all of the other taxes we have which are also way too high, thats what we get for having "free" healthcare I suppose.

Well hey, soon we may be in the same boat.

Bro-Ham for President - 2012. lol

V-Eight
12-01-09, 09:21 AM
The real problem with Canadian taxes isn't so much with the sales tax (which is not exactly low either) its all of the other taxes we have which are also way too high, thats what we get for having "free" healthcare I suppose.

I'd still rather pay a little in my taxes for healthcare than go for the American system.

hardrockcamaro@mac.c
12-01-09, 07:06 PM
I'd still rather pay a little in my taxes for healthcare than go for the American system.

Same here.
The tax contributions are way less and no company run for profit can refuse me treatment due to anything being a pre-existing condition, experimental procedure or anything else. No deductible and no loss adjuster investigating my health history either.
More money in my pocket and guaranteed cover no matter what.

Now if I could just pay less tax on my petrol I'd be a happy bunny... :D