: Is there a special way to start it?



sven914
08-23-09, 01:34 AM
The other day I took my car the shop for a flat repair (stupid bead leak), and I was watching the service manager pull it in. I saw him cranking the ignition for a while, and when the engine finally turned over he put it in reverse and she jolted to a stop. He started it again and just about got it out of the parking spot when the engine died again. He started it once more and put it in drive, and what do you know the engine died. Finally this idiot got her into the bay.

He came into the customer area and said, "Damn your car run terrible. How can you drive it with it stalling out all the time?"

And I responded, slightly, and rightfully annoyed, "Car never stalls on me."

And he arrogantly replied, "Well, is there some special way you start it?"

"It's got a carburettor," I said, "you have to pump the gas when you're cranking it."

It's amazing, the carburetor was used for over 105 years, yet in just under 19 it existence has been completely forgotten. I was talking to a service manager at a Cadillac dealership, who swore up and down that there was no way in hell that my 89 still had a carburettor. I even took him to my car and showed him and he said, "That's an after market intake or a different engine." :smack:

So anyone else have problems with service professionals not knowing what to do with that magical mixture control device that sits on your engine?

Dcarlson
08-23-09, 01:38 AM
Haha that made for a good laugh.

Angry Matt
08-23-09, 08:18 AM
That's part of the reason I will do everything in my power to do all my own work. It's unbelieveable that they let some of these people work on cars.

Bro-Ham
08-23-09, 08:41 AM
Hi,

Anyone can drive a fuel injected car. Carbs are for pros! :) I've had the same problem with others driving my car. I'm surprised my starter is still working after all the abusive cranking! Every so often I have to read my owner's manual to be sure I'm even starting it right.

My car starts when cold with one step down on the gas pedal and slow release followed then, with no foot on the gas, by cranking until it starts. Hot starts put the gas down half way and hold then crank. Both of these techniques are from the manual and they always do the trick.

A Cadillac lover friend of mine (he likes Sevilles from 76-79) formerly worked for me and would occasionally drive my 79 Cad since it was in the warehouse at the office. He would violently pump the gas pedal when cranking the ignition. Car would eventually start but it wouldn't be at high idle and needed to be nursed until it warmed up and he would tell me what a pile of junk the carbureted cars are. Like teaching an old dog new tricks trying to break him of that habit but he finally listened and did it the right way and then decided the car was OK except for the fact that it was yellow! :)

Another funny one...I loaned the car to my ex one time and same starting scenario. I hear three or four seconds of cranking then again and again and again and again and again.... - - no starting. I didn't know whether to laugh because it was so funny or cry because this car always takes such a licking in the hands of amateurs! :) Finally, with tears in eyes, frustrated as can be, nearly had a nervous breakdown because when I always started the car it always started right up and now the car is broken and boo hoo hoo. :)

Same with young valets at some of my favorite places. Car loving valets who start gabbing about how cool my old yellow tub is usually have a buddy with a "box" Caprice so they have half a clue about how to deal with a carbed car. When a valet looks at my car as an old heap there is trouble because they don't have an understanding or appreciation of older cars and when I ask if they know how to drive a car with a carb when handing over the keys there is usually a puzzled look of wonderment as to what foreign word is carburetor?!? My Cad's starter is going to sue me for abuse one of these days! :)

All part of the fun!

There just aren't enough carb cars left for folks to have any real need to know how to drive them.

Dave

cadillac_al
08-23-09, 10:32 AM
The only difference with a carb car is it takes one pump when cold. When warm you just turn the key. I can't believe that skill has been lost already.

cadillac_al
08-23-09, 10:33 AM
Oh yeah, in the old days almost any granny knew how to double clutch a transmission. That skill has definitely been lost.

Bro-Ham
08-23-09, 10:58 AM
Al, In the extreme summer heat here in FL my car, when already warm, won't run unless it is started while the gas pedal is half way down. My manual says to do it that way too. I can get away without stepping the gas half way down on the warm engine during the cool winter months (highs in the 70s with lower humidity).

sven914
08-23-09, 03:25 PM
Usually when my engine has been sitting over night (anywhere form 12 hours to 7 days), I pump the gas pedal 5 times (from half to full throttle) while cranking the engine. I use to follow the owner's manual procedure (fully depress the gas pedal 1-3 times before turning the ignition), and half the time I flooded it, which is just embarrassing :nono:.

If the engine is still warm, then I just punch the throttle once and the engine will light immediately. Usually if it has only been off for less than five minutes, I can get away with just turning the key and not touching the throttle, but every once in a while, it's not enough and the it will stall.

Bro-Ham
08-23-09, 03:41 PM
What about adding fuel injection to these old engines? Does it make sense? Is it economical to install? Who has done it?

sven914
08-23-09, 04:16 PM
I personally enjoy the smug sense of self satisfaction I get knowing that I drive a carburettor.

Bro-Ham
08-23-09, 04:51 PM
I like my carb too although it is a pain sometimes but it is different and fun! Being smug at 20 is all part of the fun! :) I'm thinking of two classic Frank Sinatra songs: "It was a very good year" and "that's life." :)

Aron9000
08-24-09, 01:09 AM
What about adding fuel injection to these old engines? Does it make sense? Is it economical to install? Who has done it?

I wouldn't bother myself. Lots of wiring and you'll need to upgrade your fuel pump and change around the fuel lines. Defintely worth it if you are changing out the whole engine to something new like a LS based motor out of a Camaro or late model Chevy truck.

I had a 1988 Toyota truck, 22R carbed motor/5 speed. You had to pump the gas to the floor two times when the motor was cold, no pumping required if it was warm. Other than that, it drove just like any fuel injected car I've had, got 25mpg too.

My main thing I don't like about a carbed V8 on a daily driver is the tendency for them to suck gas down like no tomorrow.

Bro-Ham
08-24-09, 08:41 AM
My main thing I don't like about a carbed V8 on a daily driver is the tendency for them to suck gas down like no tomorrow.

You can say that again...I drive my 79 Cad every day and my commute is about 10 or 12 miles each way and the top speed I can travel is 55 in the 45 mph zones. I swear I can see my gas guage going down down down. It's time to drill in the U.S. for our own oil so we can have .88 cent gas again. Maybe carbs will make a comeback? :)

sven914
08-24-09, 05:44 PM
My car gets an annual fuel efficiency of 16 mpg; I've gotten 23 between tanks. It's because it has a e-Quadrajet which electronically meter's the fuel consumption.


Maybe carbs will make a comeback? :)

The carburetor can never come back. Because of US emissions laws all vehicles sold in the US must have Sequential Fuel Injection (SFI). SFI Allows the computer to turn off the fuel to one or more cylinders in the event of a misfire as so raw (unburnt) gasoline cannot be exhausted through the catalytic converter.

I have an idea for a carbureted engine that uses variable valve timing to simulate the outcome of SFI. Variable valve timing uses oil control solenoids to lock certain valves into a closed position, and has been used to eliminate the EGR valve and revive the V8-6-4. My idea is to use it lock the intake valve on a cylinder with a misfire, effectively cutting the fuel to that cylinder.

bigdaddy1986
08-25-09, 02:16 PM
I loved the satisfaction of smashing the gas pedal to the floor in my 69 while driving and getting that big fuel smell. Hurt the gas mileage but O did it feel soooooo good

jey
08-26-09, 02:59 PM
I will admit I've never driven a carb car in my life. I would probably suck at it - I often have trouble getting the weedwacker going.

Lazarus_Rooney
08-26-09, 08:36 PM
It's time to drill in the U.S. for our own oil so we can have .88 cent gas again.

bro-ham for president

Stingroo
08-26-09, 08:54 PM
*votes*

You bet. Then the Presidential Limo could be a REAL Cadillac. LOL

Cadillac Giovanni
08-26-09, 09:17 PM
When my car is cold, I quickly pump the pedal 2 or 3 times. My friends always ask what I'm doing. I'm pretty sure I actually told them once, and either they didn't understand, or they just forgot. Now whenever they ask, I just stop, then turn my head slyly towards them with one eyebrow raised and stare at them for a bit.

They've stopped asking.

When my car is warm, though, I usually only have to bump the key, the starter barely makes one turn before the engine starts.

Bro-Ham
08-27-09, 12:06 AM
bro-ham for president

OK, skip the election and appoint me. Cut taxes, eliminate ridiculous government regulations, drill for our own oil, stop all wasteful government spending. Everyone will be rich and driving expensive cars and I will serve out the final 3 1/2 years of my term in the Bahamas with occasional trips aboard AF1 to wine country in Italy. The only presidential limousine I would ever want to ride in is Ronald Reagan's circa 1981 high-top stretch Fleetwood with the secret service folks in the original matching convertible Cadillac limousines with the running boards. Now THAT would be a new dawn in America! :)

dirt_cheap_fleetwood
08-27-09, 12:15 AM
I will admit I've never driven a carb car in my life. I would probably suck at it - I often have trouble getting the weedwacker going.

Haha, I was gonna say its no harder than starting a lawnmower or a tractor, but you seem to already have issues with those. :)

Actually, a carbed car is very easy to start, especially if there is an electric choke, which is pretty much standard on everything made in the last 30 years. I drove a '65 Fleetwood a while back and even on a cold start I didn't have to pump the pedal.

Cadillac Giovanni
08-28-09, 02:10 AM
OK, skip the election and appoint me. Cut taxes, eliminate ridiculous government regulations, drill for our own oil, stop all wasteful government spending. Everyone will be rich and driving expensive cars and I will serve out the final 3 1/2 years of my term in the Bahamas with occasional trips aboard AF1 to wine country in Italy. The only presidential limousine I would ever want to ride in is Ronald Reagan's circa 1981 high-top stretch Fleetwood with the secret service folks in the original matching convertible Cadillac limousines with the running boards. Now THAT would be a new dawn in America! :)

I Believe in Bro-Ham!

Stingroo
08-28-09, 09:00 AM
I second that notion.. as long as I get an occasional limo ride. lol

dkozloski
08-28-09, 12:53 PM
Does anyone remember the manual choke knob?

Lazarus_Rooney
08-28-09, 01:16 PM
my dad used to have a truck with one of those. hes not the patient type so that truck didnt stay too long.

Bro-Ham
08-28-09, 01:54 PM
I second that notion.. as long as I get an occasional limo ride. lol

Of course! You'll get your own Cadillac limo - - I think you'd be a great secretary of state! :)

sven914
08-28-09, 04:46 PM
Does anyone remember the manual choke knob?

I had an instructor who swore by manual chokes, and said that almost every time he had to repair an electronic or bi-metallic spring choke, he usually talked the customer into replacing it with a manual choke. I can't see anyone doing that, because he would then have to cut holes in the interior for the choke lever, pedal, or knob (what ever spare crap he had laying around his shop or whatever he felt like installing at whatever rate he felt like charging).