: Airplane Parts



sven914
07-18-09, 07:25 PM
I've been trying to find the source of my vacuum problems by replacing and color coding all of the vacuum lines. Today I found this sitting on my intake, next to the EGR valve:

http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=375&pictureid=4432
http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=375&pictureid=4433

It was not connected to anything, and was not there when I attempted to do my valve cover gaskets (unsuccessfully). I had to take the car to a local garage to have the passenger side valve cover gasket changed.

I believe it is the Differential Vacuum Delay Valve, but am not sure. Could this not being connected be responsible for my Cruise Control not working? I would also like to know where and how it is supposed to be connected (pictures would be very helpful). All of the hoses are connected to something, so the routing screwed beyond repair :banghead:.

I hate mechanics; Monro Muffler left half of my vacuum lines off when they did my intake gasket, and the ones they did put back, were put back wrong ( the ILC is now routed to a 3-way connector on the passenger side of the engine and I can't find the Anti Dieseling Solenoid):arghh:! I had to take the car back to them, ten times, before I was able to shut it off without it dieseling (and I'm sure they were just finding new homes for the lines, and not fixing their mistake).

05devilledave
07-18-09, 08:08 PM
I wish I were near your area, Id fix it right. Not all mechanics are bad. I just finished putting my 429 in my 67 fleetwood back together after new valve guides, valve seals, valve grind, and new gaskets all around. I was worried Id get the vacuum lines screwed up to the climate controls, carb, and tranny. Granted they are simple compared to your car. But before I knew it, I was done, and they all made it back to where they are supposed to be. I must have subconciusly did it. I guess its a skill I have acquired from having torn down many, many engines. I even managed to get those half inch bolts on the back of the heads that hold grounding straps and the tranny vacuum line. Sorry to hear about your vacuum troubles. I know all to well about rip off shops. I went to a midas once when I first met my wife and she had a 90 s10 blazer. I installed all new ball joints, tie rod ends, idler arm, pitman arm, and bushings. I had my wife take it to Midas just to have an alignment ONLY done. Being that she was a female, they decided she was stupid, and tried to scam her. They told her they cannot do an alignment on worn out, old front end parts. She called me and I STORMED down to midas and demanded that the manager show me the worn items. I informed him that I just installed the ENTIRE front end full of new parts. He then told me he had the wrong invoice for our vehicle. I told him to get my G.D. blazer off the lift and in the parking lot immediatly, I was taking it elsewhere. So I did.

Lazarus_Rooney
07-19-09, 12:39 AM
I feel your pain, every last bit of it. The vaccum lines on my car were almost as boned up as the ignition wires. (some of the IGNITION wires were on the wrong spark plugs, my cars ignition and vaccum systems were a biblical disaster when i bought it.) All i can tell you is that Im almost certian that part you found belongs somewhere in the vicinity of the drivers side of the carburetor. I spent several hours with a friend scratching my head and routing vaccum lines by trial and error until they were mostly right. I would love to see a proper soluition to this, because my cruise control doesnt work either and I know my car can run smoother than it does. All this leads me to wonder if theres any way to eliminate some of the lines.

perks
07-19-09, 03:09 PM
Hard to say precisely where the part should go (thankfully, I haven't had to fuss with vacuum lines in years), but I can confirm that you are correct on identifying the part as the vacuum delay valve. The part # is fairly ubiquitous among GM vehicles of that era.

sven914
07-19-09, 08:06 PM
Not all mechanics are bad.

I know they're not, I'm one of them; Associates degree in the Applied Science of Automotive technology. I don't work on my own car because I don't have anything above a standard socket set. I would never dream of working on a customer's car, and forgetting where the pieces went, and then just leaving them abandoned in the engine bay.

csbuckn
07-19-09, 11:40 PM
I think the best way to route the hoses is by the emisions sticker. This ones a little harder but you should be able to get it close. I had trouble with the anti-diesel sol also. Couldnt find it but runs decent without it.

Aron9000
07-20-09, 02:07 AM
Go buy a GM shop manual for your car(the one made by GM that the dealer would use). Its like the bible for your car, it will have a diagram for routing vacume lines.

sven914
07-20-09, 02:33 AM
Go buy a GM shop manual for your car(the one made by GM that the dealer would use). Its like the bible for your car, it will have a diagram for routing vacume lines.

Actually I have one, and have found a very nice picture of the anti-dieseling solenoid, and have something that looks like the anti-dieseling solenoid in my car, except instead of having the ILC, Vac Tank, and VDV routed to it, it has the line for the brake booster, one that runs off a T from the line for the Climate Control, and a line in from the CANP valve. I honestly have trouble reading the emissions routing on the front clip, and the one in the book isn't much bigger, so I could understand a few of the lines getting confused, but this is the equivalent of going to Burger King on a busy day, and aggravating the wait staff, so they piss on your Wopper :king:.

75sled
07-21-09, 09:37 AM
I went and had my vacuum diagram (and electrical diagram) blown up to a 4ft X 3ft sheet of paper. I went to office depot and they helped me do that for about $5. Best thing I ever did. Mine was acutally on CD and was just a file that they printed off, but i am sure they can copy a sheet of paper and do the same thing.

sven914
07-21-09, 11:04 PM
I think the problem I have reading the routing is in that is missing some key components. Where is the Cruise Control Servo?

One of my instructors from college gave me a hand drawn copy of his cruise control vacuum routing, for his 85 Electra. The diagram has a line coming from the vacuum tank, through a check valve, to the large connector of the CC servo. It then has the smaller connector routed to the firewall. Is this the correct routing for the Brougham?

codewize
07-22-09, 09:42 AM
gm/acdelco auto parts 22526610 valve asm diff delay


I say get yourself a book or at least an AllData account.

sven914
07-22-09, 05:10 PM
I just went through and hooked up the VDV, VDR, and Anti-dieseling solenoid, as it is pictured in my book. I had problems with the vacuum tank, because my diagram has two lines coming off of it and going to the anti dieseling solenoid and to manifold vacuum, so, and because Cadillac only graced me with one vacuum port to vac tank, I had to T my one line off to get it to go both places (it was already T'd into the line for the brake booster). I also disconnectedly the cruise control, because I had one line coming to it from manifold vacuum, and according to my instructor's diagram, I needed one from the vac tank (I redirected the line from manifold to the vac tank).

Now with all that said, my engine is now running-on/ dieseling. The only other problem I found with the routing was that the Canister Purge Solenoid is routed to the wrong carburetor port. The port it is supposed to go to has a large diameter hose on it, which goes to the firewall, through a hole under the brake booster. Is this the line I need for my cruise control, from the servo to the inside of the car? Could the Canister purge Solenoid not being routed right cause the run-on? Could the run-on be caused by the VDV being on upside down, or Vacuum Regulator Valve not having that foam filter over the open bottom port?