: OK, what's my 1st mod & when should I do it?



Gary Wells
07-12-09, 02:32 PM
Auto, brand spanking new, 30 miles on the clock, what should be my 1st mod & should I do it now, wait until it is broken in, wait until the warranty expires, or not do it at all? I'm also thinking dyno before any mods are done and regardless of whether any mods are done.

SlvrBullIT
07-12-09, 03:31 PM
Well I guess it's up to you, really.....
I just got my V 3 weeks ago and am "gently" breaking it in, fluid change soon. Do we go buck wild and do the intake and exhaust right away or one piece at a time?????
I'll probably start with intake first after bone stock dyno, CAI and tune somewhere around the 2000+ mile mark then dyno post install.
Next I plan on pulley, HX upgrade, header, catback, tune then dyno around 6-8K mile mark. I'm reserved with the exhaust part until reliable O2 sensor placement is figured out on the heads. I'm not breaking into the engine for heads or cam work until 15K miles or later, as more "stuff" comes out for the V and more data comes out for what the 6L90 transmission can or can't take.
Just my opinion of course.... Some people have already gone nuts and totally modded, the thrill seekers will hopefully keep us informed on how the mods affected their motor and drivetrain.

mighty_quad4
07-12-09, 03:45 PM
Auto, brand spanking new, 30 miles on the clock, what should be my 1st mod & should I do it now, wait until it is broken in, wait until the warranty expires, or not do it at all? I'm also thinking dyno before any mods are done and regardless of whether any mods are done.

no offence, but go to a driving school first before you worry about making the car faster. pretty much any drivign school is ok. theyll teach you proper line and best of all they ll teach you practical defensive driving techniques wheon the street.

the "driver mod" is the single most important mod you can make. make it FIRST.

SlvrBullIT
07-12-09, 04:01 PM
^^^
/agree
If one was near me here in New Braunfels Texas I would go, but I may have to go to one like Bondurant.....
Anyone have any other suggestions?

Gary Wells
07-12-09, 04:16 PM
I do believe that a driving school such as the ones done by Bob Bondurant are beneficial as a general rule, but depending upon one's goals, the cost of such a course might exceed the value gained in some cases. I do not intend on tracking the car, but an occasional spirited stoplight excursion might be interesting. I rarely play on the street, as this is the People's Republik of Kali and they can and will, in most cities, counties, & jurisdictions take your car on the spot for speed contest and crush it. Although it's hard to believe, they really don't care it it is paid for, under lien, in someone else's name, or your wife's car. And you can kiss your license good-bye too. But I do appreciate the suggestion of the school and I might look into it. What driving schools & courses have you been to?

KatMcRat
07-12-09, 04:59 PM
Pat went to Bondurant probably 5 years ago and loved it. I went to Spring Mountain 2 years ago and went though it at Pat's request. Spring Mountain had a defensive driver portion that Bondurant didn't unless they have changed. They would pull our ABS fuse and get the concrete wet so we would know what the corvette would do in those situations. I completed the class but it just confirmed my love for drag racing over road racing.

For Christmas this year we are going to Frank Hawley's drag racing school in October in Vegas for us both to become licensed to run 9's :burn:

Just an FYI for anyone else that is reading this. Spring Mountain is now running a class for teens. My kids will be going to this class as soon as they get their license.

Gary Wells
07-12-09, 05:21 PM
You're a brave woman, KatMcRat, I don't go that fast in my sleep. I have heard that upon completion of the Frank Hawley course, a person have a real respect for what a drag car feels like at that speed.

KatMcRat
07-12-09, 06:31 PM
You're a brave woman, KatMcRat, I don't go that fast in my sleep. I have heard that upon completion of the Frank Hawley course, a person have a real respect for what a drag car feels like at that speed.

Well Pat created a monster 7 years ago when I made my first pass in his 2000 SS now he has to live with her :histeric:

I have gone 10.59 in Casper and my goal is to run a 9.999 in him after Pat gets done playing in the dirt and salt :bouncy:

Luna.
07-12-09, 11:33 PM
Auto, brand spanking new, 30 miles on the clock, what should be my 1st mod & should I do it now, wait until it is broken in, wait until the warranty expires, or not do it at all? I'm also thinking dyno before any mods are done and regardless of whether any mods are done.

No matter what, I'd get a dyno run prior to the installation of any mods. It's the only real way to determine if your modifications are doing any good or not.

As far as what mods, that all depends on your goal(s). If you just want a little more power, then get a TUNE and call it a day. It's easily the best bang-for-your-buck in my opinion. I bet you get in the neighborhood of 50rwhp.

At the moment, that's all I have and it is quite a nice ride. For me, it ISN'T enough, so I'm going to go a little further. How much? That's a hard call.

I keep going back and forth, for having a, say, 700rwhp car would be REALLY COOL, but the problem then becomes traction. I bet 700rwhp in a CTS-V wouldn't get traction until like 70 mph and even then I bet it's questionable...

As such, I'm shooting for somewhere in the neighborhood of 600rwhp (I'll probably be a little under), for I'm willing to bet the tires won't go koo-koo at that power level.


no offence, but go to a driving school first before you worry about making the car faster. pretty much any drivign school is ok. theyll teach you proper line and best of all they ll teach you practical defensive driving techniques wheon the street.

the "driver mod" is the single most important mod you can make. make it FIRST.

Good advice

Prof
07-13-09, 09:06 AM
Another concept that has served me well over the years...

First things first. A decision up front about what your end goal really is...will save lots of false steps. By no means do you have to do it all at once, but knowing where you are going is critical in making the decisions in route.

I have a an SRT 10 that gets lots of modification attention...the CTS V is a daily driver and will continue to be so. If it were the "fun vehicle" my approach would certainly be different.

Plan your work and work your plan.

Gary Wells
07-13-09, 11:33 AM
Well, so far I think that it is going to be:
Stock configuration dyno run
Remove the lower end of the air cleaner box & brake duct.
tune
re-dyno
stay there for a while

Gary Wells
07-13-09, 01:59 PM
I appreciate all of the suggestions & comments, and I think that I will stay pretty light at least for a while. I am deliberately avoiding stetting any specific goals right now as I pretty much want to play it by ear. I would rather take it slow, even though it generally costs more in the long run, to avoid having to say, I wish that I would have stopped when I had a 12 sec car, a statement which I have heard from quite a few turbo brick peeps when they got down into 10's before realizing that it took some of the fun out of the game. I believe that I would like to see the car a tad quicker without giving up too much reliability and or smoothness. Thanks again for everybody's input.
TIA/R: Gary Wells