: PCV Help



DopeStar 156
05-30-09, 05:04 PM
So I figured out why my '76 DeVille is idling so poor, or at least I think I have. The hose that runs from the carburetor to the PCV valve broke completely and is now disconnected from the carburetor and a small portion of hose including the metal pinch clamp are still attached. Does anyone know if I can get this broken remainder off without removing the A/C compressor? It's a pretty tight fit with the elongated compressor almost butt against the carburetor. Seems like such a big job just to replace a rubber hose, can anyone help?

77CDV
05-30-09, 07:45 PM
Sorry, dude, you're moving that compressor. No other way to get to that hose connection at the front of the carb unless you can make your hands really small. Just remove the four bolts holding the compressor to the block, then move it out of the way, leaving everything else connected. Shouldn't be that hard, really.

DopeStar 156
05-30-09, 08:09 PM
Sorry, dude, you're moving that compressor. No other way to get to that hose connection at the front of the carb unless you can make your hands really small. Just remove the four bolts holding the compressor to the block, then move it out of the way, leaving everything else connected. Shouldn't be that hard, really.

Just the bolts? I figured the lines and everything else could stay hooked up but I don't have to relieve the tension on the belt? Compressor's not gonna shoot up and smack me in the face? Hahaha.

77CDV
05-30-09, 10:36 PM
If it does that, your belts are too tight lol! But, yeah, common sense would dictate that you relieve the belt tension first. Again, not too difficult.

DopeStar 156
05-30-09, 11:25 PM
If it does that, your belts are too tight lol! But, yeah, common sense would dictate that you relieve the belt tension first. Again, not too difficult.

Good to know......

DopeStar 156
06-02-09, 11:49 PM
Well I got started on it today and it was a hell of a lot of effort to change a rubber hose but I can proudly say that my efforts were rewarding to say the least.....

First thing I did was drop the tension on the power steering pump to take the tension off the compressor (Thanks 77CDV...) I took the belt off the pulley and checked it, looked acceptable so I payed it no mind, actually all the belts/hoses looked to be in good shape so they must have been replaced prior to me buying the car. Then I took off the upper radiator hose since it bridges the compressor. The coolant in the water pump and radiator was a nice healthy green but the inside of the hose was like rust colored and a little of the coolant inside it was the same way, strange but I also decided to shrug it off. Next came the 5 bolts holding the compressor on and I picked it right up out of the way and propped it up against the fan shroud. The rubber hose remnants I took off the carb were essentially plastic, they disintegrated. Hooked up the new hose and PCV valve and put everything back on in reverse order after cleaning a lot of what I took off. The engine compartment looks a lot cleaner now but still not great. My next endeavor was pretty hard, believe it or not, the PCV elbow is ridiculously difficult to find. I work for AutoZone and we couldn't get one. Everyone else I called didn't even have a listing for it but I got lucky with CarQuest who was able to order me one. That company Help! makes one apparently, GM discontinued it. I ran out to pick up the elbow after CarQuest called me and picked it up. Threw the elbow on and completed the PCV connection and fired it up, the car runs beautifully now, better than ever. Makes sense since a leaking PCV system will cause vacuum leaks and will throw off the fuel mixture.

One issue still remains and that's that the car dogs out under acceleration. I just figured it was the ignition system so I plan on doing a tune-up from plugs all the way to rotor. The plugs in that car could be original judging by how they look......

Quick question about my cooling system but should I be concerned about that discoloration inside my radiator hose?

csbuckn
06-03-09, 12:37 AM
Cool to see it worked out. I know that when some people go look at a used car, the radiator cap is the first thing they look at. Not sure why but I would think its to see if theres oil within or on the cap. Me personally would think about my radiator if there was discoloration in the hoses, or flush the system. But good looking fluid might mean the previous owner noticed the same thing and already did the flush. Since your tranny fluid and coolant go through the radiator, I would check the tranny fluid to make sure it doesnt look mixed with coolant. But then again, the hose could just be old...

DopeStar 156
06-03-09, 01:32 PM
Cool to see it worked out. I know that when some people go look at a used car, the radiator cap is the first thing they look at. Not sure why but I would think its to see if theres oil within or on the cap. Me personally would think about my radiator if there was discoloration in the hoses, or flush the system. But good looking fluid might mean the previous owner noticed the same thing and already did the flush. Since your tranny fluid and coolant go through the radiator, I would check the tranny fluid to make sure it doesnt look mixed with coolant. But then again, the hose could just be old...

Well I was told that the radiator was new so maybe the old one was contaminating the hoses. Now the car's been sitting for about a week so the coolant in the hoses may have absorbed that discoloration. The hose's age is unknown to me but it feels soft and not brittle or dryrotted so I dunno. Ya think I should throw a set of rad hoses on the car just to be safe?

77CDV
06-03-09, 07:45 PM
With respect to your hoses, good hoses should be pliable but firm, never spongy. If the radiator was replaced before the hoses, then it's possible the old radiator did contaminate the hoses. Although, why anyone would replace the radiator and not the hoses at the same time is a curious thing. It's also possible that the rust is from a source other than the radiator. Check your engine oil for contamination and evidence of rust. Also, with the car cold, open the radiator and run your finger around as far down the radiator neck as you can. If if comes back rusty, well, guess the a-hole lied about changing the radiator (or just failed to get specific as to what decade he did it).

As to the hesitation on acceleration, the FSM recommends the following: check all vacuum hoses for splits, leaks, and proper connection; possible air leaks at carb mounting and intake manifold; bad ignition wires; sticking carb, choke or throttle linkage; misadjusted fast idle cam; faulty carb accelerator pump; misadjusted idle speed or timing; malfunctioning air cleaner snorkel damper door.

Glad to hear fixing the PCV circuit sorted out the last problem. Isn't restoring cars fun? :)

DopeStar 156
06-04-09, 01:42 AM
Isn't restoring cars fun? :)

When it works, sure..... Haha.

I handle new radiator hoses at my job all the time so the ones in my car feel like they're good. I'll have to feel around inside the radiator when I get a minute to go out there and do so....

As for my drivability issue I'm gonna check all the vac lines but the ignition system should really go. None of it looks fresh, especially the plugs. Never took one out to inspect but the last time I disconnected a wire it broke so I suppose it's time.....

Any other tips for me? I've been pretty motivated to work on this car lately....

csbuckn
06-04-09, 04:02 AM
You should probably still do the hose because it will drag that rust/discoloration back into the motor and who knows what the lower radiator hose looks like, but maybe you can just take it off and clean it out. I bet a cap, rotor, wire change would help some

77CDV
06-04-09, 02:23 PM
All the stuff I listed above is from the FSM diagnosis tree for "hesitation", which is what I'm thinking you mean when you say the car dogs out. If the ignition wires, plugs, and plug wires look bad, changing them can't hurt. Unless the distributor cap is cracked or there is obvious burning inside, I'd leave all that alone. The HEI unit is designed to last the lifetime of the car.

When was the last time you flushed the coolant? I do mine every Spring. It's overkill, I know, but I've never overheated yet, even at 75 with full AC across the southern Arizona desert in high Summer.

What else did you have in mind to work on this year? The kindest thing you can do for these old cars is to drive them. The really hate just sitting around, and let you know it by developing all sorts of expensive problems.

DopeStar 156
06-04-09, 06:24 PM
All the stuff I listed above is from the FSM diagnosis tree for "hesitation", which is what I'm thinking you mean when you say the car dogs out. If the ignition wires, plugs, and plug wires look bad, changing them can't hurt. Unless the distributor cap is cracked or there is obvious burning inside, I'd leave all that alone. The HEI unit is designed to last the lifetime of the car.

When was the last time you flushed the coolant? I do mine every Spring. It's overkill, I know, but I've never overheated yet, even at 75 with full AC across the southern Arizona desert in high Summer.

What else did you have in mind to work on this year? The kindest thing you can do for these old cars is to drive them. The really hate just sitting around, and let you know it by developing all sorts of expensive problems.

The car is pretty rough looking. Needs plenty of bodywork and interior work but for now my goal is to get the car road ready before the end of June. Here's my list from the beginning of the spring.

1. Starting problem
2. Fuel leak
3. Bad idle
4. Poor acceleration
5. Burnt out lamps changed (a few have accumulated)
6. Interior reassembled
7. Registration/Insurance
8. Wheels balanced
9. Water leaks fixed

So far I've killed off the first three, the last six still remain with a couple I'd let slide for the sake of being able to actually drive this car. This is the closest the car has been to road ready since I've bought it. Last couple years I've just been slowly (and I do stress slowly) bringing this car to road condition and so far I've done it all without the assistance of a mechanic shop, and just that of a couple friends of mine. I have never flushed the coolant since I've bought it but it looked ok. The coolant in my other car is something like 5 years old and still looks healthy.....

77CDV
06-05-09, 11:08 PM
OK, so is the car just kinda hesitating from a stop, or is it that the car is just really sluggish in accelerating? I'll post the FSM diagnosis tree for the latter when I get home. Everything else you listed is a piece of cake. Just put the interior back together, even if you have to use the old bits for now, just for the sake of driving the car this summer. Then, just enjoy the car for what she is now. Yeah, she's not all pretty like your '89, but she has her own charms and I guarantee that driving her will give you a whole new motivation to make her right again.

If it helps, watching you chug along with your '76 inspired me to pick up my '69. Like your CDV, my FWB needs lots of love and affection, but I have to say that since I got the majority of the mechanicals sorted, I've been enjoying the hell out of just cruising around in her, f-ed up body, baked interior, and all. And like my Fleetwood, your coupe has great potential, and the end result will be worth all the effort. In fact, I think you'll appreciate the car more knowing how much work you put into it to make it your own.

Now go drive that magnificent beast! :)

Craig

77CDV
06-06-09, 12:45 AM
OK, here's what the FSM recommends for sluggish or spongy acceleration: check for dirty or plugged air cleaner; malfunctioning damper door in air cleaner snorkel; igition timing off; sticking throttle or choke valve; bad EGR valve; bad distributor vacuum advance unit; worn spark plugs; carb out of adjustment, including power piston, float, metering rods, power valves, or dirt in carb air horn.

The upshot is that a major tune up should cure most of what ails the Blue Beast. Happy wrenching!

Craig

DopeStar 156
06-08-09, 07:31 PM
The vacuum advance for the distributor is connected but the line is hard and comes off easily. It doesn't fall off but it pops right off with zero effort. I wonder if it's not sealed well enough and could be causing an issue.....

77CDV
06-09-09, 02:23 PM
It's a good possibility, and should be corrected in any case (prob a good idea to replace all the vacuum hoses as they're all likely in the same shape). I'm still a fan of your planned major tune up idea. That should make a world of difference in how the car performs.

DopeStar 156
06-09-09, 08:49 PM
Yeah I still plan on changing the plugs and wires and all that. Good thing about this set up is diagnosis is pretty straight forward......

77CDV
06-09-09, 10:08 PM
Here's a little something to keep you inspired:

http://www.lov2xlr8.no/brochures/cadillac/76cadillac.html

Enjoy!

Craig

DopeStar 156
06-10-09, 10:31 AM
Here's a little something to keep you inspired:

http://www.lov2xlr8.no/brochures/cadillac/76cadillac.html

Enjoy!

Craig

I have that brochure! haha. I have that one and two from 1989 including one in plastic which I've never even handled. The other '89 I open and read and all that. My FSM and Owner's Manual for my '76 I got off eBay and were both NOS brand new never used.....