: Fuel pump removal pictures



planocolt
01-25-09, 01:11 PM
OK just to let everyone see the great access panel in a 99 STS and the ease of service for a fuel sender unit.

Nice access in the trunk:

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1298.jpg?t=1232905752

Herer is a picture of the lock ring: No threads!!

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1300.jpg?t=1232905854

Here you can see the ring about half relocked (see the slots )

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1304.jpg?t=1232906110

Old dirty Fuel sending unit:

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1312.jpg?t=1232906346

Problems with your fuel gauge, here is the problem, see the deposits and the corroded contacts:

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1316.jpg?t=1232906853

Note: no "Melted wires..." hmmmmmmm


http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm95/planocolt/100_1314.jpg?t=1232907050

chubbyranger
01-25-09, 01:31 PM
Did you use a lock ring tool or just pound it? I've been trying to psych myself up for this job for two years, but I suffer from fuel-a-phobia. Already bookmarked this thread. Thanks for the pix.

planocolt
01-25-09, 01:38 PM
Did you use a lock ring tool or just pound it? I've been trying to psych myself up for this job for two years, but I suffer from fuel-a-phobia. Already bookmarked this thread. Thanks for the pix.


Sooo easy, pb Blaster, Sit for 1 hour, BIG hammer and basically a huge Flathead screwdriver. It took some pounding AND all fuel lines were still connected. Once it pops, it's off. The bigger hammer theory worked here.

Total replacement time (aside from the PB blaster wait time) ~1 hour (including removing the inner trunk liner).

tateos
01-27-09, 06:59 PM
Is that similar to a BF Hammer?

Ranger
01-27-09, 08:39 PM
Did you use a lock ring tool or just pound it? I've been trying to psych myself up for this job for two years, but I suffer from fuel-a-phobia. Already bookmarked this thread. Thanks for the pix.
Don't worry about it Chubby. You're not very likely to create any sparks and even if you did, the tank is still sealed until the retaining ring is off and the pump is pulled. When I did one many years ago on a Chevy Blazer I had to pump down about a half tank of gas. Had buckets of gas all over the place.

chubbyranger
01-28-09, 07:43 PM
Don't worry about it Chubby. You're not very likely to create any sparks and even if you did, the tank is still sealed until the retaining ring is off and the pump is pulled. When I did one many years ago on a Chevy Blazer I had to pump down about a half tank of gas. Had buckets of gas all over the place.

I figured I'd run the tank down to ~3 gallons or so left before I start. Part of my hesitance is that my car has lived its whole life in the salt-laden Northeast so I expect the corrosion factor to be substantial :suspense: I suppose pulling the cover off and having a look would be a good first step. I always worry about resealing the fuel line connections so they don't leak, although these look to be fairly simple to disconnect. And since my garage isn't heated its going to be a chilly job, unless I get out my propane bullet heater :eek: Probably not the best idea :cookoo:

Ranger
01-28-09, 07:49 PM
Technically, you are better off with a full tank. An empty tank is full of fumes and much more explosive than a full tank.

chubbyranger
01-28-09, 08:11 PM
When I did one many years ago on a Chevy Blazer I had to pump down about a half tank of gas. Had buckets of gas all over the place.


Technically, you are better off with a full tank. An empty tank is full of fumes and much more explosive than a full tank.

:hmm: Why would you pump the tank down if you should start with a full tank? :confused:

Ranger
01-28-09, 09:26 PM
Because I did not have an access panel and had to drop the tank. I needed to lighten it.