: want to upgrade my memory RAM. input needed



yourgmsolutions
11-16-08, 11:21 PM
so many choices. but I know so little. anyway, I founded something that seems to be ok, but don't understand the difference between those two.

here is the link below. but if there are better choices, please let me know. thanks

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010170147+50001183+1052107965+1052308477+105240 7862&Configurator=&Subcategory=147&description=&Ntk=&SpeTabStoreType=&srchInDesc

Submariner409
11-17-08, 10:49 AM
Take a look at your computer manual and/or build tag. That will give you the size and speed of the current RAM card. Most PC's and laptops have space for 2 cards, so if your unit has, say 512 mb of RAM, you could go to one more for a total of about 1 gig or buy a matched 2-pack of cards (Ultra sells them) to get the same brand/performance in each card. Processors and motherboards determine just how much memory you can have "on the board", so maybe you need to talk to a local geek.

Bottom line is that you need to know your computer's installed hardware and current speed/configuration before sticking more cards in.

yourgmsolutions
11-17-08, 12:52 PM
I already have 1 gig of memory. but need more. mother board has slots for two more cards. speed of current RAM cards is 400 and they are 2x512 corsair.

gfourth
11-17-08, 01:54 PM
I already have 1 gig of memory. but need more. mother board has slots for two more cards. speed of current RAM cards is 400 and they are 2x512 corsair.

What type of RAM is it? DDR? DDR2? Nevermind, saw your link.

Make sure you match your current RAM's type, ie: DDR, DDR2. The different types have different number of pins, so if you get the wrong stuff it's like trying to fit a square peg in a round hole; they won't fit in the slots.

It's okay to buy Ram that is rated faster than your current RAM, ie: if you have say PC2700, its okay to run PC3200.

The most important is to make sure you run either two sticks OR 4 sticks of RAM. If your computer is somewhat newish, then it will be dual channel. Running only one stick, or 3 sticks will limit it to single channel and severely limit the RAM access bandwidth.

CIWS
11-17-08, 06:40 PM
http://www.jdoqocy.com/image-3235443-10521304
so many choices. but I know so little. anyway, I founded something that seems to be ok, but don't understand the difference between those two.

The two sticks are built with different chips on the ram sticks, one (64) being slight more expensive to manufacture. In the end game no real difference as both sets are the same size (memory capacity), no heat spreaders and CAS 3 timings. The motherboard will try and set the timings based on the slowest RAM in the board if you mix.

Personally I've never been a big fan of mixing, especially with RAM being low right now.

yourgmsolutions
11-17-08, 09:35 PM
thanks guys for input. I guess I'll just throw away my current RAM, and just buy 4 sticks of 1 gig each.
with 4 gig of RAM memory my computer should be flying.
based on revews, Kingston should be ok brand

mythy
11-17-08, 09:40 PM
Whats your PC specs? Mobo/CPU Kingston is ok.. Corsair is better Geil is great as well along with Patriot and OCZ


Personally I killed pairs from every manufacturer so I cant really recommend one over the other...

AMGoff
11-18-08, 01:52 AM
Just go to Ramseeker.com and find whoever's selling PC3200 modules for the cheapest price... Don't get too caught up in manufacturer's claims and buzz-words. In the rare event that any of the chips are bum (which can happen with any manufacturer), simply send them back and order from the next one up.

Some people swear by certain names, but honestly... I would never waste the extra money on Kingston or any other "big" name simply for the sake of buying the badge... Over the years, I've found it's simply not worth the difference in price for an imperceptible performance increase that'll probably only register on a benchmark utility.

CIWS
11-18-08, 09:36 AM
Most name brand companies "Value Ram" is fine for normal applications of the PC (Corsair, Kingston, Crucial, etc). If you were an "enthusiast" who pushed their box beyond standard limits, I would recommend something different.

codewize
11-18-08, 10:32 AM
Corsair and Crucial are far from Value RAM. Crucial is probably some of the best memory made and it's all I'll put in a mission critical box.

I would get a well known brand of the fastest memory your board supports. If it allows for ECC then do that too. If the board supports dual-channel then install in pairs in the proper banks. It sounds like the board is pretty old if it's 400MHz

I guess it depends on what you want the box to be really. I'm rambling from my perspective.

CIWS
11-18-08, 12:05 PM
Corsair and Crucial are far from Value RAM. Crucial is probably some of the best memory made and it's all I'll put in a mission critical box.

A lot of the companies sell sticks that they call "Value Ram". I'm running 4 Gigs of Corsair's "Value Ram" in a couple of my 939 pin boxes. Works just fine at spec. They are usually bare sticks, no heat spreaders and lower CAS timings.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145579

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820146841

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820134008

Submariner409
11-18-08, 04:29 PM
Sort of along the same lines, 1. How much, or what determines, the amount of RAM a given computer will handle, and 2. My creaky ol' PC runs a 4 year old Pentium 4 processor. Is there any sort of a meaningful processor upgrade?

I'm not a gamer or video player......basic computer/Internet duffer.

yourgmsolutions
11-18-08, 05:31 PM
my comp is 3 years old. so i assume its a junk to this day standats

AMD Athlon(tm) 64 Processor 3000+
CPU speed 1800 MHz

I founded some good deal on crucial RAMs
the only question I have is, when I read reviews, few people said that when they bought RAM chips, it was DOA. I'll be ordering 4. so if one of them lets say will be deffective, how would I know that? or is there another way to test them?

gfourth
11-18-08, 05:50 PM
my comp is 3 years old. so i assume its a junk to this day standats

AMD Athlon(tm) 64 Processor 3000+
CPU speed 1800 MHz

I founded some good deal on crucial RAMs
the only question I have is, when I read reviews, few people said that when they bought RAM chips, it was DOA. I'll be ordering 4. so if one of them lets say will be deffective, how would I know that? or is there another way to test them?

If a RAM stick is DOA, the PC will not boot up; it won't get past POST. In other words, it won't get past the point where your computer beeps right after you power it on.

If a RAM stick is failing, you'll usually get BSODs (Blue Screen of Death).

CIWS
11-18-08, 10:19 PM
If you suspect you may have funky RAM that's causing system errors and/or BSOD you can run Memtest86 and it will run it through various read/write tests and look for errors.

http://www.memtest86.com/

CIWS
11-18-08, 10:24 PM
Sort of along the same lines, 1. How much, or what determines, the amount of RAM a given computer will handle, and 2. My creaky ol' PC runs a 4 year old Pentium 4 processor. Is there any sort of a meaningful processor upgrade?

I'm not a gamer or video player......basic computer/Internet duffer.

1. The motherboard's chipset and BIOS. There will be a max amount that can populate the board in various configurations.

2. Not that's worth the money now. Save your beans and upgrade the system when you have to due to operating system / software requirements.

dkozloski
11-18-08, 11:01 PM
A lot of machines won't recognize over 3 gigs of RAM unless you're using a 64 bit operating system. You can install 4 gigs but the machine will only see and use 3 gigs.

CIWS
11-19-08, 08:35 AM
A lot of machines won't recognize over 3 gigs of RAM unless you're using a 64 bit operating system. You can install 4 gigs but the machine will only see and use 3 gigs.

A lot of those era boards they describe above wouldn't populate over 2-3 gigs.

ewill3rd
11-19-08, 10:23 PM
I'd also find out what mobo you have and make sure it will support 4GB before you go buying it.
A lot of older boards won't handle too much RAM. It can't address it all.
Some new boards will handle like 8GB, not sure what the highest is right now but lots of memory is cheap these days, I remember when I was paying $1 a Meg!!!
(that would kill you by today's standards)

The guys that say their RAM is DOA probably murdered it with ESD.
I make sure to ground myself and wear latex gloves when handling any IC components.
I haven't lost a part yet since I started doing that. At least not during assembly :D

codewize
11-19-08, 10:37 PM
OK I see what you're saying. So you would think that the Balistix from crucial would be the high end stuff, which it is. But I have to say their mainstream product, I believe, are far superior to many others.

Additionally, the MoBo has a max RAM spec. If RAM has or is failing set the BIOS to do an extended memory test on POST and it'll tell you. Or if it's shot all together you'll get a specific set of beeps. I think 1 long and 3 short?

Windows XP Pro will recognize and use up to 3.5 GB

On a builders note I replace my PC about every 5 years. I get away with that duration because I usually try to use the latest and greatest parts regardless of cost, within reason of course. This way I'm not looking to upgrade in 12 months and I'm not recommissioning my PC on 36 months. I usually get away with about 5 years.

Right now I'm working on a Pentium D 3.4GHz with 2 GB RAM that was assembled on Nov 23, 2005. Still works fine. I also make sure to use a higher end MoBo such as a Supermicro either hi-end workstation or entry level server board. The total cost at build time as around $1400 cost.


A lot of the companies sell sticks that they call "Value Ram". I'm running 4 Gigs of Corsair's "Value Ram" in a couple of my 939 pin boxes. Works just fine at spec. They are usually bare sticks, no heat spreaders and lower CAS timings.


http://www.jdoqocy.com/image-3235443-10521304http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145579 (http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-3235443-10521304?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newegg.com%2FProduct %2FProduct.aspx%3FItem%3DN82E16820145579)

http://www.jdoqocy.com/image-3235443-10521304http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820146841 (http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-3235443-10521304?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newegg.com%2FProduct %2FProduct.aspx%3FItem%3DN82E16820146841)

http://www.jdoqocy.com/image-3235443-10521304http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820134008 (http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-3235443-10521304?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newegg.com%2FProduct %2FProduct.aspx%3FItem%3DN82E16820134008)

dkozloski
11-19-08, 11:51 PM
I'd also find out what mobo you have and make sure it will support 4GB before you go buying it.
A lot of older boards won't handle too much RAM. It can't address it all.
Some new boards will handle like 8GB, not sure what the highest is right now but lots of memory is cheap these days, I remember when I was paying $1 a Meg!!!
(that would kill you by today's standards)

The guys that say their RAM is DOA probably murdered it with ESD.
I make sure to ground myself and wear latex gloves when handling any IC components.
I haven't lost a part yet since I started doing that. At least not during assembly :D
I have seen the time when 16k bits not bytes of RAM cost $44,000.

codewize
11-20-08, 12:59 AM
Things have certainly changed. When I built my first homemade PC back in 93' I think I paid well over $300 for 32 Megs on a screaming DX2 66MHz system. Not to mention the insanely large 730 meg hard drive.

My dad worked for IBM for several years. When he started fresh out of the service he said that memory was a room you walked into. Each room was 1 meg and there were guys specially trained to go in and fix parity errors, manually.

My first real PC, after the PC Junior, was an IBM PS/2 model 60 running at 16 MHz with 1 meg of RAM and 2, count them 2 60 Meg hard drives. My dad told me I'd never fill it up and that there were large business' running on less computer than that, LOL. There was also a warning sticker on the top of this tower warning about the weight of almost 70#

yourgmsolutions
11-20-08, 01:32 AM
first PC I saw in person was in 1993. and first PC I own was like in 1996

ewill3rd
11-20-08, 07:48 AM
The first thing I had that was close to a computer was a Vic 20.
The first PC I bought was a 486 SX 33 with 4MB of RAM and a 120 MB hard drive.
I paid over $1,600 for it and it was junk.

I am building a Core 2 Duo 3.0 GHz system for a friend that specs out nicely for just under $1,000 plus a 26" flat display that cost her $400.
I wish I had the dough to build myself a new one, and I wish this one would die.... I mean it is okay for what I use it for but it is aging.
I saw Intel just came out with something new... an i7?
Looks interesting.

Submariner409
11-20-08, 09:56 AM
This is sort of off the RAM topic.....Back in 1962 I went through Career Counselor School (U.S. Navy) at Bainbridge, Maryland. A day field trip was to the Social Security headquarters outside Baltimore. SS had just installed the latest UNIVAC computer - I have no idea of the "size" in bytes, but the "computer" was almost the same cubic size as a large school classroom !!! All vacuum tubes, thousands of them, and thousands of plexiglas-board hand-wound ferrite doughnut/copper logic matrixes. The whole thing was forced ventilation, and the resulting heat was used to buffer the building heat system in the winter !! It was fed by banks of huge 3/4" tape machines fed by 250 female punch-card operators. IBM cards, remember ?? All data was entered by the punch cards, and the women started, stopped, and took breaks by a timed bell system. How things change......Your PC has more data capability today than all of SS had 50 years ago.

codewize
11-20-08, 12:17 PM
Up I'm with you on that. A little before my time to remember but I do remember punch cards. I had boxes of them my dad brought home for us to play with.

This is all to funny. I also remember learning about UNIVAC in school.

urbanstyles
11-21-08, 04:49 AM
Keep in mind that you may be limited by your operating system as to how much memory is available for use. Unless you have Vista.. which blows and should be turffed immediately. My guess is you are running XP in which case anything over 4 gigs is a waste. With the low prices of new equipment these days you may find better value in replacing more than just your memory. You can do a new processor and board for less than $300 that will fly much more than simply doubling your RAM.. all depends on your budget.

ewill3rd
11-21-08, 07:51 AM
I am often torn between upgrading and replacing. The cost savings is not much compared to the performance increases. 4 years is a good replacement timetable, which puts me overdue actually on this one.
Sometimes it is worth spending a bit more to start over than it is to "save" money and keep what you have with an upgrade or two.
I have too many computers now actually. Including my wife and mother-in-law there are 6 computers networked and I have 2 more at work. I actually sold off one of my other old ones but I bought one more.
What can I say? My wife's work makes her get a new 'puter every 4 years and they told her she could have her old one for $50!!
I dropped in some memory I had laying around and I might get a vid card for it, but it is a 3.0 GHz P4... would have been stupid to pass that up.

codewize
11-21-08, 11:19 AM
LOL I hear that. At last count I have in use 5 PC's plus my laptop. Then there's my wife's laptop and a couple computers sitting in the hallway.

4 years is a great rule of thumb. That's about what I budget for with my clients as well. I try to stretch mine to 5 but that's really about the limit. Then I recommission my workstation into my new file server.

ewill3rd
11-23-08, 09:22 AM
All this talk about memory had me doing some research last night, this rig I am going to build next week... well I had to change my mind on the memory. I couldn't figure out why this was so much cheaper than the others but after a tad of investigating I see why. I think I might switch to another brand to keep the price low but get better performance out of the chips.
Amazing what you can learn in just a short time.... I am still itching to build myself a new monster!
The two rigs I rely on most are aging rapidly.
This one here is pretty stable until you plug in a USB device like a jump drive. Then it starts randomly rebooting.
I think it is the mobo, it has had this issue for a long time. It gets worse with the printer I use and the crappy software it comes with.
They have issued like 4 updates to address the problem but it still does it if I plug in anything else USB.
:(

codewize
11-23-08, 10:56 AM
That's interesting. I've seen that USB problem on several brands of computers as well. You'll also see BSOD, Boot failures and such. I've seen that on Acer, Dell and HP systems, newer systems not 4 and 5 year old units.

PatrickHMS
11-23-08, 10:59 AM
According to the configuration of your PC, and what Operating System you are using, 4GB
of the correct (type/speed/specs) RAM might not be appreciably faster than 2GB. As
mentioned above, using RAM in even # or pairs of sticks (preferably matched) is important.
But at some point, some configurations and some Operating Systems will only recognize a
certain amount of RAM, and anything above that will be overkill and not even used by the
Operating System.

As mentioned above, when you use unmatched sticks of memory, your PC will adjust
everything down to the speed of the slowest recognized module of memory you have installed.
But if your PC requires PC3200, that is pretty old technology for a PC, you likely are running
with Windows XP, and whatever RAM upgrade you make will be the the cheapest performance
upgrade you can do to any PC of that era and technology.

Also consider Craigslist as a source for parts, especially for an older PC, where you can usually
get some real deals on all kinds of PC parts for older PC's. I often look there before I even go to
a retail store.

Just keep in mind that someday in the near future XP will intentionally be caused to
become obsolete and no longer supported, and many of these PC's will not be able to
run Vista efficiently, so be aware of that before you put too much money into an older PC.

PatrickHMS
11-23-08, 12:40 PM
For that age PC, we now know that the amount of memory that will be recognized by any system can be limited to what limits are set by the mfg of the PC, or of the motherboard (a motherboard that might accept 2g as max, might still only accept 1G at the system level (by the Mfg.), or by the Operating System (generally limited to 3.5G) under Windows XP or XP Pro.

Another currently cheap resolution is to determine the max speed processor your current motherboard will allow. These may be available new, or used on eBay or Craigslist. After RAM has been upgraded, correct CPU upgrade will max out what your system can do, but only spend money that you are willing to not recover as these parts will soon be obsolete, as they have already seen their best marketable years.

I have an old 2002 era Socket "A" motherboard maxed out with 1G memory (limited by the Mfg of the System (although the Mgf. of the motherboard would have allowed 2g), and an XP 2600 CPU running Windows XP. This PC runs at a clockspeed of 2.13GHz which is plenty fast for internet, email, surfing, and that sort of thing.

I also built an Intel Core 2 Duo based machine that runs at 3.2GHz clockspeed that will do just about anything I want to do with it.

Good luck, and have fun...

ewill3rd
11-23-08, 06:31 PM
Code, I am using an old Asus P4P800 Deluxe.
It has been a good board all except for this random reboot junk. Anytime I leave a jump drive plugged in I never know when it will randomly reboot, it usually does it at exactly the wrong moment.

I ordered 2GB of OCZ performance memory instead of the Kingston with the CAS Latency of 6. I could have gone higher but I got some 5 instead. I'll have to tweak the BIOS a bit when I get it all running... did I say that already? LOL

codewize
11-24-08, 09:37 AM
You know this is sad but I'm an authorized OCZ reseller, mostly because I'm very fond of PC Power and Cooling power supplies and I guess OCZ owns them now.

Until this thread came up I had no idea they made memory. I guess I can assume the RAM is as top notch as the PSU's.

ewill3rd
11-24-08, 08:42 PM
I had never heard of them but this stuff comes pretty well recommended on their site and it looks fine, at least better than the kingston I was looking at.
I hate to buy brands I have never heard of, but after a bit of research I think I'll be just fine.