: ? Parking brake effort ??



CTSV OWNER
06-22-04, 10:39 PM
My driveway has a slight hill. When I get out to open the garage door I have to smash the Parking brake pedal to the floor, or the car creaps down my driveway. (no a garage door opener is not a option)

Do any of you find in order to set the brake properly you have to make sure to press it to the floor? In all the other cars I have owned there is resistance before you get near the floor and they hold. I was just wondering if this is due to the 4 wheel disc setup with the tiny parking brake drum on the inside.

benjet
06-22-04, 10:51 PM
Mine did that too (my driveway has a rather heavy incline) when parked there. The dealer adjusted it so it only needed to be pressed halfway down to be fully engaged. Only problem is over time it's back to the floor, I'll have the dealer re-adjust it again soon.

We've lost 2 Denali's to this (same problem) already, hope I don't continue to have this problem on the V.

-Ben

Wienk
06-22-04, 11:34 PM
Geez, guys, I really respect most of the knowledge about our cars that you continually share through these forums. But, am I so old as to be the only one left to remember that one should put the damned car in gear before turning off the engine so it doesn't roll up, or down, the hill that one parks on? Oh, and by the way, if you have ever even visited San Francisco or another hilly city, check the instructions given in the rental car contract, or the state's driver instructions, or just use your common sense! Turn the front wheels towards the curb when you park!

Put the car in gear before you leave it parked! That is one of the beautiful things about a "stick shift"... the engine is positively "locked" to the rear wheels when the clutch is engaged.... no fluid coupling!

Duh!

Or, you could put a brick behind the wheels, but make sure it is on the "downhill" side!

benjet
06-22-04, 11:49 PM
Geez, guys, I really respect most of the knowledge about our cars that you continually share through these forums. But, am I so old as to be the only one left to remember that one should put the damned car in gear before turning off the engine so it doesn't roll up, or down, the hill that one parks on? Oh, and by the way, if you have ever even visited San Francisco or another hilly city, check the instructions given in the rental car contract, or the state's driver instructions, or just use your common sense! Turn the front wheels towards the curb when you park!

Put the car in gear before you leave it parked! That is one of the beautiful things about a "stick shift"... the engine is positively "locked" to the rear wheels when the clutch is engaged.... no fluid coupling!

Duh!

Or, you could put a brick behind the wheels, but make sure it is on the "downhill" side!Ok now I've got to say somehting bc I LIVE IN SF (I'm a native who is NEVER leaving). My V will pop out of gear, in fact it has and rolled away from me (3ft. before I leaped back to to jam on the regular brake) in a parking lot (very slight incline) while I got out to put somehting in the trunk - I have witneses who were in the car (they saw me put it in 1st) then I got out and it began rolling backwards and the stick jumped into neutral! All while the parking brake was down most of the way, but not fully depressed. They suggested I carry "chalks" :crying:

Now that I think about it I turn it off THEN put it into gear - I'll try it the other way next time. But at the same time I can get the car out of any gear (without much effort by my shift hand) while parked without using the clutch.

-Ben

P.S. Denali #1 Totaled due to parking brake failure, the other lemoned do to parking brake failure - nice to know it's the same design on the V.:crying2:

ctsvett
06-23-04, 02:41 AM
I have this problem also.. On my list to have it fixed when I take the car into the dealer.

It was somewhat sad however that I learned of the problem while test driving a V at the dealer (before mine arrived)... the salesman almost rolled into traffic because he did not set the brake the whole way down and the car started to roll... Good thing he caught it.

I am most worried if I am ever forced to valet as some places do (I NEVER valet normally, not to thread jack, cause I know what they do to your car). What happens if the valet does not set the brake the whole way down nad rolls into a wall or another car? I dont want to deal with that!

Reed
http://www.cadillacfaq.com (back up and running!)

V-Love
06-23-04, 02:51 AM
That parking brake screwed me hard. I set to the floor and stepped out of the car for a minute and it rolled into a Yukon. The Yukon bumper hit the V-emblem on the trunk. It put a nice little dent there which I haven't attended to yet cause I don't know the best way to go about it. It didn't break the paint but I am very pissed. I wonder if they would cover that at the factory.

trekster
06-23-04, 03:01 AM
I just had that parking break problem right now, as I was getting ready to open my garage. Luckily, I got the car on time or I wouldve broken the door since I left the door open and the door would've hitten the wall.

DgtalPimp
06-23-04, 10:39 AM
What gear (1st, reverse, 5th) is best to leave the V in while parked to help insure the V to stay where it is parked? I am asking a mechanical questions, not what your grand pappy told you to do.

:coolgleam

Dgtal

lasstss
06-23-04, 12:01 PM
I always throw mine into reverse. Never had a problem. Incline or not.

THe damn car rolls easily it you leave it out of gear. Problem is I dont like planting a parking brake on hot rotors. Im also due for the adjustment.

T_Dogg8
06-23-04, 12:14 PM
Geez, guys, I really respect most of the knowledge about our cars that you continually share through these forums. But, am I so old as to be the only one left to remember that one should put the damned car in gear before turning off the engine so it doesn't roll up, or down, the hill that one parks on? Oh, and by the way, if you have ever even visited San Francisco or another hilly city, check the instructions given in the rental car contract, or the state's driver instructions, or just use your common sense! Turn the front wheels towards the curb when you park!

Put the car in gear before you leave it parked! That is one of the beautiful things about a "stick shift"... the engine is positively "locked" to the rear wheels when the clutch is engaged.... no fluid coupling!

Duh!

Or, you could put a brick behind the wheels, but make sure it is on the "downhill" side!
i sure hope you put the parking brake on also. i had a friend get hit by a car in a parking lot with no one in it. it was actually pretty funny cuz we had to find the guy. he had it in gear and the car sat there about an hour or so before it rolled.

the engine might be positively locked while in gear, the only problem is, nothing positively locks the gear in place.

bryce3
06-23-04, 01:24 PM
Ben,I also live in the Bay Area and I have had bad luck with my '02 Escalade p-brake, fingers crossed with the 'V'. If you find a good shop in the No. Cali. let me know.
beeboybryce@sbcglobal.net
Sean

rabid
06-23-04, 01:28 PM
What gear (1st, reverse, 5th) is best to leave the V in while parked to help insure the V to stay where it is parked? I am asking a mechanical questions, not what your grand pappy told you to do.

:coolgleam

Dgtal
From my experience, I put the car in gear in the opposite direction from which is downhill.

Let me explain. If the front of the car is facing downhill, I put it in reverse. If the rear of the car is heading downhill, I put it in first. The reason is because the gears in the transmission will have to rotate against the direction the rear end/driveshaft is rotating, making it more difficult to start a roll.

And I put it in first instead of another gear because, well, I have had to jump start manual transmission cars and ATVs before by rolling them down a hill, and when you do so, you put it in a higher numbered gear, like second or third. The reason (I think) is because it is easier for the engine to turn over smoothly and start easier when the engine is at a lower RPM. When parked, I believe it will be more difficult to allow the engine to turn over (not start, of course) and begin rolling when the car is in first.

I too have found that I need to press the parking brake pedal hard all the way to the floor. It makes it difficult when I am only using the outside of my left foot so that I try not to scuff up the kick panel with my shoes.

urbanski
06-23-04, 04:32 PM
the V i test drove had the same "pedal to the floor" parking brake. I'll have them tighten mine when she comes in. *makes reminder*.

And i once heard to leave manuals in second while parked....

railcop094
06-24-04, 07:30 PM
I put mine in gear the other day, or thought I did, to go into a store. I remembered forgetting something and returned only to find my car out in the middle of the lot with 4 people holding it back. Had they not caught it, it would have rolled into some other cars. I thanked them profusely. I had set the parking brake but did not force it to the floor.

The best gear to leave it in is reverse since that is the lowest ratio gear in the tranny. The next best is first gear. The higher gears will just not hold it.

Vedder
06-24-04, 08:16 PM
Could 4th be better. It actually takes more power(gravity), to pull a bigger gear, right?:bonkers:

DgtalPimp
06-24-04, 08:18 PM
Vedder -- That is why i asked about fifth gear, since it should be the tallest right?

Dgtal

BUILDINGCTSAMG
06-24-04, 08:24 PM
If it came out in in an auto it would fix everything!

benjet
06-24-04, 08:25 PM
If it came out in in an auto it would fix everything!
Well yeah except Denali #1 (SUV = auto) still totalled due to failure of the parking brake.
Anyway not sure how you figure 5th being tallest, but ok.

Gear/Ratio
1st-2.97:1
2nd-2.07:1
3rd-1.43:1
4th-1.00:1
5th-0.84:1
6th-0.56:1
Reverse 3.28:1

DgtalPimp
06-24-04, 08:28 PM
Why would you want an auto V? Fixing the brake problem has zero to do with crippling a V like that. They should fix the brake issue, and move the F’ing peddle to a center mount handle.

The opinions expressed here are for amusement only, They do not reflect the opinions of management, teenage mutant ninja turtles, or your mother.

Dgtal

DgtalPimp
06-24-04, 08:29 PM
Gear/Ratio
1st-2.97:1
2nd-2.07:1
3rd-1.43:1
4th-1.00:1
5th-0.84:1
6th-0.56:1
Reverse 3.28:1
So the higher the number the more effort it takes to move the car?

Dgtal

drdsgolf
06-24-04, 08:56 PM
Yep, I've had my V three months, 3400 miles, and I have to pin the parking brake to the floor to get it to work. Waiting for my oil light to come on and get it done then.

ds

CTSV OWNER
06-24-04, 11:11 PM
Well atleast I know my car operates "normal" as the rest of everyones car acts the same. I guess I'll just shut the engine off, stick it in gear, smash the parking brake to the floor, get out open the garage door, get back in start my car back up then pull into the garage.
I wonder if I just sit there and lay on the horn if honey would come and open the door?

Now did you notice how we have to call it a "parking brake" and not a "emergency brake" sort of like "bulkhead" used to be called a "firewall"

Don't use the parking brake in a emergency and don't expect the bulkhead to stop any fires.

globed70
06-25-04, 07:55 AM
What's more irritating:

1. That the V has a foot-operated emergency brake?
2. That the foot-operated emergency brake doesn't work well?

Now on to the good stuff:

I believe that the emergency brake in the V does not engage the actual caliper/pad/rotor... I think it has an aux brake for this purpose. Anyone?

The numerically higher gear provides the most resistance to movement as the engine would have to turn more times per turn of the tire... so you present far more friction into the equation. I have always used 1st gear, but many guys use Reverse so as to put less wear on 1st, and: Reverse has an even higher numerical ratio and reverse may add more friction due to additional gears being engaged in the box.

T_Dogg8
06-25-04, 08:02 AM
I wonder if I just sit there and lay on the horn if honey would come and open the door?
that depends, do you like sleeping on the couch??:rolleyes:

DgtalPimp
06-25-04, 09:08 AM
The numerically higher gear provides the most resistance to movement as the engine would have to turn more times per turn of the tire... so you present far more friction into the equation. I have always used 1st gear, but many guys use Reverse so as to put less wear on 1st, and: Reverse has an even higher numerical ratio and reverse may add more friction due to additional gears being engaged in the box.
Thanks, this is the tech answer I was looking for.

Dgtal

CTSV OWNER
06-25-04, 10:04 AM
The parking brake is a integral drum built inside the rear rotors. It is a seperate set of shoes and independent of your normal brakes.

benjet
06-25-04, 12:08 PM
The parking brake is a integral drum built inside the rear rotors. It is a seperate set of shoes and independent of your normal brakes.
:yeah:

Raven05
06-25-04, 01:31 PM
Having "push started" many cars and motorcycles with dead batteries, I guarantee the resistance to rolling is greatest in the gears with higher numerical ratios. A large displacement bike will stop dead when you "pop" the clutch in 1st gear but will turn over and (hopefully) start in 2nd or 3rd. It's probably just psychological, but I like to park in 1st when facing uphill and in reverse when facing downhill or on level ground.

urbanski
06-25-04, 01:35 PM
Having "push started" many cars and motorcycles with dead batteries, I guarantee the resistance to rolling is greatest in the gears with higher numerical ratios. A large displacement bike will stop dead when you "pop" the clutch in 1st gear but will turn over and (hopefully) start in 2nd or 3rd. It's probably just psychological, but I like to park in 1st when facing uphill and in reverse when facing downhill or on level ground.
well, very informative.
thanks

lasstss
06-25-04, 01:51 PM
Dropped mine off at the dealer this am.

Park brake adj (too low) Interesting thing. It holds on rearward roll but not forward at the same setting.
straighten the steering wheel
bump idle
fix the drivers seat/ The bun seems to move around.

2004ctsv
06-25-04, 04:49 PM
So the higher the number the more effort it takes to move the car?

Dgtal
Yes, most power by the engine to turn the wheel. but if you're using the engine for a brake, you want the lowest gear (reverse).

thebigjimsho
06-25-04, 07:27 PM
The parking brake is a integral drum built inside the rear rotors. It is a seperate set of shoes and independent of your normal brakes.My '88 Corsica had rear drums and a hand brake. Great for tailgaters! An ultraquick yank and release would let loose a nice plume of tire smoke. Freak people out BIG TIME!

My '01 Accord coupe had rear discs and a hand brake. You could not lock those up unless on a wet road and turning. That's why discs are better than drums, better control and modulation.

Now with the V, the trouble is those nice beefy Brembo calipers in back. For as awesome the stopping power is, that's why we need independent brakes for parking.

As for what gear to leave it in, the manual specifies reverse. But I live near Boston, so, no worries here.

Redline
03-01-05, 04:32 PM
Renew an old thread (searching does help) with a new twist:
Does anyone know how to adjust the parking brake so it doesn't go to the floor?

At the dealership today they stated that it would be about 2 hours because they have to remove wheels AND rotors. I know from past experience some cars have an adjustment nut/screw somewhere between my foot and the rear wheels.

Looking for an easy fix or looking at several hours of bad television at the dealership soon.

... thanks for your support.

BeagleBrains
03-01-05, 04:59 PM
Emergency brake is meant to imply reliability and redundancy. Your regular brakes are hydraulic with two main, completely separate, actuating systems. One hydraulic subsystem will operate the left front and right rear wheel brakes, should one half of your hydraulic connections fail or leak. The other half of the hydraulic system connects to the right front and left rear wheel brakes. Emergency = fully redundant (stand alone operation) in that this is entirely mechanical. Connecting to a redundant (separate from all the other brake stuff) system, linked to both rear wheels, to actuate an independent mechanical brake in the event that all hydraulic functions are lost. Three separate systems with two different designs for safety.
The reason you have two head lights is not to keep the car symetrically balanced; two headlights provide reduncancy, when one fails. Since both lights are the same age (the remaining light is likely to die soon), you should replace both, when one burns out. Of course, turn signals are different, having a specific position/direction indicating function. Brake lights = redundancy again.

benjet
03-01-05, 05:20 PM
Emergency brake is meant to imply reliability and redundancy. Your regular brakes are hydraulic with two main, completely separate, actuating systems. One hydraulic subsystem will operate the left front and right rear wheel brakes, should one half of your hydraulic connections fail or leak. The other half of the hydraulic system connects to the right front and left rear wheel brakes. Emergency = fully redundant (stand alone operation) in that this is entirely mechanical. Connecting to a redundant (separate from all the other brake stuff) system, linked to both rear wheels, to actuate an independent mechanical brake in the event that all hydraulic functions are lost. Three separate systems with two different designs for safety.
The reason you have two head lights is not to keep the car symetrically balanced; two headlights provide reduncancy, when one fails. Since both lights are the same age (the remaining light is likely to die soon), you should replace both, when one burns out. Of course, turn signals are different, having a specific position/direction indicating function. Brake lights = redundancy again.

Only problem with that is that in a manual trans car it's a PARKING brake (not an E-Brake), and since I've had GM lemon another car for it's failure to work properly (it's a CA law that the parking brake hold the car fully on an incline), this continues to be a sore spot for me.

BeagleBrains
03-02-05, 05:41 PM
Emergency, Parking, whatever. My GM cars have usually required frequent cycling this brake to keep it adjusted, per the owner's manual. Actual operation will adjust and keep it "tight". The car should be rolling ahead, just a little, to get the proper adjustment. However, I have had very few cars in which this Parking brake actually worked.
The redundancy of design is the only point to be made. Iowa law has the same expectation, however frivolous this may be. "The check's in the mail!"

RobzBLKV
03-02-05, 06:36 PM
Edit - totally missed how old this thread was. Doh!