: Clutch reservoir sediment / contamination



SFBayV
10-16-08, 05:41 PM
I've only been able to find one thread here and nothing on the FAQ regarding the clutch reservoir having a dark sediment-like substance in the fluid. has anyone else seen this or have any ideas as to the cause? I'm having my clutch system bled by the dealer, but I don't recall ever seeing anything such as this. I'm wondering if any of the hoses or seals are deteriorating.

YoshiV
10-16-08, 06:14 PM
It's from the hose that comes off the fluid reservoir...

NormV
10-16-08, 06:21 PM
Seems all GM clutch systems are similar. If flushed annually you not have any residual. You may find that it comes back in a week or so of daily driving. Just keep cycling new stuff in and you'll have it clean.

Norm

SFBayV
10-16-08, 06:37 PM
Thanks everyone. I'll point that out to the dealer. Hopefully the flush / bleed will clear it it out, and I'll monitor it on a regular basis. Thanks again.

Rey
10-16-08, 10:24 PM
I never bother to flush either the brake or clutch. There is a very, very small level of fluid circulation in the systems. That's why the fluid in the reservoir becomes black. If there was no circulation your reservoir would look clear. So, if you just use a simple, cheap turkey baster and draw out the old fluid and squirt in new fluid you will be sort of "flushing" your system. True, a good bleeder flush is the best method, but it is a lot of work; and I submit that over the life of a vehicle the difference is slight. Consider that most vehicles last several hundred thousand miles and never have their fluids changed.

SFBayV
10-17-08, 01:16 AM
Thank you Rey. I should say my reason for wanting the flush / bleed is due the fact that when I first purchased the car in the beginning of August, the reservoir was empty. Even though I can't say as to how low in the line the fluid was, the clutch wasn't disengaging properly so the reservoir was the first area that I inspected. This was when I noticed the sediment in the fluid. The system may have air trapped in it, so I believe that a full bleed at the dealership is warranted.

One thing that the service adviser told me was that the reservoir being empty was a normal occurrence brought on by normal clutch wear. That sounds like an awful lot of clutch wear to me. Particularly with a clutch that exhibits no sign of slippage.

robertb
10-17-08, 08:54 AM
I never bother to flush either the brake or clutch. There is a very, very small level of fluid circulation in the systems. That's why the fluid in the reservoir becomes black. If there was no circulation your reservoir would look clear. So, if you just use a simple, cheap turkey baster and draw out the old fluid and squirt in new fluid you will be sort of "flushing" your system. True, a good bleeder flush is the best method, but it is a lot of work; and I submit that over the life of a vehicle the difference is slight. Consider that most vehicles last several hundred thousand miles and never have their fluids changed.

I respectfully disagree. I have been flushing my brakes and clutch reservoir before each track event. The brake flush is obvious (and frequently required by the various clubs). I also noticed the low fluid level and the high contamination of the clutch fluid when I first started using my V for track events. I do notice a difference in the clutch function if the fluid was dirty after it is flushed, i.e. smoother action and easier shifting. So, I would strongly recommend flushing the clutch fluid an some regular basis. Repairing the clutch itself has to be more expensive in the long run.

Robert

lollygagger8
10-17-08, 09:00 AM
That reminds me to go turkey baste mine out! Thanks!!

PISNUOFF
10-17-08, 09:58 AM
I respectfully disagree. I have been flushing my brakes and clutch reservoir before each track event. The brake flush is obvious (and frequently required by the various clubs). I also noticed the low fluid level and the high contamination of the clutch fluid when I first started using my V for track events. I do notice a difference in the clutch function if the fluid was dirty after it is flushed, i.e. smoother action and easier shifting. So, I would strongly recommend flushing the clutch fluid an some regular basis. Repairing the clutch itself has to be more expensive in the long run.

Robert

:yeah:

Otherwise the burned up, dirty, water impregnated junk fluid at the very ends of the lines never gets replaced.

a64pilot
10-18-08, 05:13 PM
It's not just GM. My Miata does exactly the same thing. I use the little rubber bulb you get at pharmacies for kid's noses. Smaller and less likely to drip. Anyway I suck out and put new fluid in every oil change. Funny how the brake fluid stays clean, but the clutch get's nasty quick.