: Asphalt is expensive. How about that tar?



Jesda
10-02-08, 04:40 AM
http://www.chattsnaps.com/2008/09/tar-and-gravel.html

They recently did this in downtown St Louis. An entire street was repaved with this mixture of tar and gravel. It makes downtown look like a section of rural road, and there's loose gravel scattered about.

The good: Its cheap. Uses way less crude oil.

The bad: It eats tires and looks cheap. Durability is questionable depending on how well it was done. Gravel ends up chipping windshields, store windows, and parked cars.

codewize
10-02-08, 09:57 AM
That method is called Oil and Stone. It's been around for a long time. Soon the gravel will dissipate and usually after a few weeks they'll come and sweep up the excess.

It makes a great durable surface, usually used on secondary lower traffic roads. I don't think Oil and Stone can carry the heavy loads like blacktop, but it's perfect for the less traveled areas.

That road shown doesn't look like a typical candidate for Oil and Stone or 'Chip Seal' as they call it. They just did my road as well but I live on a back road.

Submariner409
10-02-08, 10:41 AM
Over here on the Eastern Shore the method is called "Tar & Chip". Almost every rural secondary road here is done that way. As previously mentioned you have to be careful until the surface gets flattened and compressed by traffic - bluestone chips fly everywhere and the tar in summer is no fun, either.

dkoz, Long ago, wasn't most of the ALCAN (?) Highway a mixture of gravel, tar, and rock for 1,400 miles ?? My sisters, attending U of A, Fairbanks, said you had to rig galvanized screening over and under a car to prevent the chips from eating through the undercarriage and eroding the paint.

MauiV
10-02-08, 10:57 AM
They just resurfaced the state highway outside of my neighborhood and I DREAD driving the V on it. I try to stay as far behind traffic as realistically possible since my front end already has enough chips and blemishes.

dkozloski
10-02-08, 06:34 PM
Over here on the Eastern Shore the method is called "Tar & Chip". Almost every rural secondary road here is done that way. As previously mentioned you have to be careful until the surface gets flattened and compressed by traffic - bluestone chips fly everywhere and the tar in summer is no fun, either.

dkoz, Long ago, wasn't most of the ALCAN (?) Highway a mixture of gravel, tar, and rock for 1,400 miles ?? My sisters, attending U of A, Fairbanks, said you had to rig galvanized screening over and under a car to prevent the chips from eating through the undercarriage and eroding the paint.
The major share of the AlCan highway that is in Canada is tar and chips because it is much easier to repair the frost damage than asphalt pavement. The Alaska highway in Alaska is hot asphalt. I've been over it dozens of times and never bothered with the screen. That's required by people that follow other cars too closely. Before the tar and chips it was gravel and mud. I was over that dozens of times as well. During that era the best time of year to make the trip was in the dead of winter when it was covered with snow and frozen solid.

My_favorite_Brougham
10-02-08, 06:59 PM
I forgot that other states have bad roads.. I'm spoiled here in Texas! :D

dkozloski
10-02-08, 07:17 PM
I forgot that other states have bad roads.. I'm spoiled here in Texas! :D
In Texas the big danger is dropping a wheel in a badger, armadillo, or prairie dog hole. Pots dig holes in the northern states.

Rolex
10-02-08, 10:24 PM
Several of the small roads in southern Arkansas used to be paved this way. It didn't seem to wear well or last very long. It's "black-top" (asphalt) and concrete roads in the NW corner of the state.