: Fuel Gauge Damage by High Sulphur Content



growe3
05-29-04, 12:37 AM
For those of you that may have damaged fuel gauges, attached is a link that explains how gasoline with to high of a sulphur content, has ruined many gauges by corroding the electrical contacts with sulfur.

Maybe some of you have been effected by this contaminated fuel.

-George

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...e/sulfur_in_gas (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&ncid=&e=9&u=/ap/20040529/ap_on_bi_ge/sulfur_in_gas)

S10xGN
05-29-04, 11:41 AM
Hmmm, that sounds fishy as all h#ll to me! I work in a refinery and make gasoline blending stock. The stuff we make has less than 2PPM (parts per MILLION) of sulphur in it. There are other components from other units in our refinery that have more than 2PPM's but after suitable blending, not enough to do that kind of damage. Someone at their blending plant must have mixed in a tank of untreated naptha or gasoline. For that kind of damage to be occuring, this "gasoline" would have to be hurting way more than the fuel gauge! And it's my opinion that the fuel gauge would be the last thing to see "damage" as the corrosion could not take place without oxygen being present, unless there is "enough" oxygen in the reformulated fuels. I dunno, just sounds too hokey to me...

JimD
05-29-04, 12:27 PM
Similar report in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 29, 2004, p G3; attributed to Associated Press.

AP says the "high sulphur" gasoline came from the Motiva Enterprises refinery in Norco, LA, and ended up in Shell and Texaco stations in New Orleans as well as Miami, Tampa, Sarasota and Fort Lauderdale, FL. The gasoline is no longer being sold.

eldorado1
05-29-04, 12:35 PM
The problem is the silver contacts on the fuel level sender... Silver doesn't require oxygen to 'corrode'. In fact, your silverware does the same thing when exposed to various household compounds containing sulfur (mayo, eggs, mustard are a few). Ag + S = AgS (silver sulfide) Anywho... somebody dropped the ball on that one.

bigred
05-29-04, 12:40 PM
The problem is the silver contacts on the fuel level sender... Silver doesn't require oxygen to 'corrode'. In fact, your silverware does the same thing when exposed to various household compounds containing sulfur (mayo, eggs, mustard are a few). Ag + S = AgS (silver sulfide) Anywho... somebody dropped the ball on that one.
Anyone who lives in Texas, Oklahoma, or other oil drilling regions knows that anything silver in the house will turn black very quickly when there is an H2S leak from a well!

S10xGN
06-01-04, 11:07 AM
Sorry! I wasn't aware there were silver contacts in the sending unit... :canttalk:

chiefster
06-01-04, 05:41 PM
Does anyone know if this could cause an DTC code of C1277- REQUESTED TORQUE SIGNAL CIRCUIT MALFUNCTION.

After disecting the the DTC code Icame up with the following:

C = Chassis
1 = MFG
2 = Fuel & Air Metering (Injector)
77 = Fault (I guess that this is the particular area of interest)

PLEASE!!! someone help. I think that this may be because of the gas issue here in Fort Lauderdale, but I am not really sure. It happened the same day that the reports came out on the news. Anyone that knows what this error code is for, please help. Thanks

growe3
06-05-04, 10:15 PM
It sounds more like a transmission signal fault. I don't believe it would have any connection to the high sulphur gas problem.

These error codes can be inttermitent faults, so unless it keeps returning I would not worry about it.


Link below has the complete OBDII codes listed if you are interested.
http://myweb.accessus.net/~090/dtcobd2.html#cha

-George

Smokey
06-08-04, 03:18 PM
I read that the "high" sulphur content in the fuel used in the US had caused some premature engine wear in the 98-99 V8 Jaguar motors that used the Nakasil (not sure on spelling) cylinder coating.

BeelzeBob
06-08-04, 10:54 PM
I read that the "high" sulphur content in the fuel used in the US had caused some premature engine wear in the 98-99 V8 Jaguar motors that used the Nakasil (not sure on spelling) cylinder coating.

I don't know about Jag engines but BMW had a HUGE problem with this....

The byproducts of combustion with the high sulfur fuel will creat sulfuric acid...which will strip the nikasil coating off the cylinder bores and cause the bores to scuff and score and fail. Only recourse is to replace the engine.

caddyshack24
06-08-04, 11:23 PM
Damn, I've used gas from both Texeco and Shell, in Central Florida.
I filled my tank at Shell, 93 grade, sometime later I noticed that my gauge was acting up.. seems to lose 20-30 MPG then re-finds it later down the road.

I'm positive it's something fuel sender related, do i have a claim or should i just say screw it?

I fuel up at Cheveron now, meant to get a sample and do the water/alchohol test.
You know, add water to seperate the two.

eldorado1
06-09-04, 01:28 PM
the water/alchohol test.
You know, add water to seperate the two.
Now you've got me curious... what's this?

BeelzeBob
06-09-04, 02:30 PM
Now you've got me curious... what's this?

Alcohol has a greater affinity for water than gasoline....and gasoline does not mex with water......sooooo.....mix an equal amount of water with a quantity of gasoline. Shake the mixuture up and let settle. See if the amount of "water" changed. If it did, then there was alcohol in the gas that combined with the water increaseing the apparent volume of water.

If you have a 200 or 250 ml graduated cylinder it is easy....put in 100 ml of water and 100 ml of the fuel inquestion. Shake (don't stir) and let settle. If the water level is now at 105 ml then the fuel was 5% alcohol........

eldorado1
06-10-04, 11:26 AM
That is awesome... I wonder how much they're putting in without telling me........ I think it's time to test the local gas stations ;)

N0DIH
06-26-05, 05:13 PM
I have heard the semi's have talked about having to deal with low sulfur diesel. All the talk I have heard makes it sounds like a bad thing. Is it bad in diesels?


I don't know about Jag engines but BMW had a HUGE problem with this....

The byproducts of combustion with the high sulfur fuel will creat sulfuric acid...which will strip the nikasil coating off the cylinder bores and cause the bores to scuff and score and fail. Only recourse is to replace the engine.

BeelzeBob
06-27-05, 02:30 PM
There is a real need for low sulfur diesel fuel in the US so that automotive diesels have a chance at meeting the emission requirements. The amount of sulfur is not carefully controlled in diesel fuel and the "standards" for sulfur in US diesel fuel is pretty high compared to the rest of the world/Europe. Low sulfur diesel fuel is coming. It is not a bad thing for Class 8 diesels (semis) but making the low sulfur diesel fuel makes it slightly more expensive (at least that is the refineries excuse for raising the price) so it costs more at the pump which raises the price of diesel for all users. The only bad thing about the low sulfur diesel fuel is the price in other words.