: My 21st Birthday!



93DevilleUSMC
12-29-07, 04:23 AM
Well, I am 21 as of today, December 29th, 2007. Feel free to leave some birthday posts in this thread! Happy New Year and God Bless to all of you.

Semper Fi!

-Josiah

dkozloski
12-29-07, 04:33 AM
Happy Birthday! Keep your head down! Don't do anything you wouldn't do on a bicycle.

gary88
12-29-07, 04:45 AM
Happy bday! Hope you have a good one.

93DevilleUSMC
12-29-07, 04:50 AM
Happy Birthday! Keep your head down! Don't do anything you wouldn't do on a bicycle.

Hmm...I can think of some nasty stuff to do on a bicycle :banana:


Happy bday! Hope you have a good one.

Thanks! Didn't you just have one yourself?

Cadillacboy
12-29-07, 08:50 AM
Happy Birthday !!!!!

EcSTSatic
12-29-07, 11:17 AM
Happy Birthday!!
I remember my 21st. Before then, I was able to drink on base and overseas, but when I got stationed back at MCAS El Toro in CA I had to wait until I was legal to have a drink in town.

Semper Fi

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-29-07, 11:57 AM
This is the last important birthday you'll get to experience for 19 years, so enjoy it while you can! Happy Birthday!

Rolex
12-29-07, 01:51 PM
:bdmuffin::cake:

Have a good one. :cheers:

gdwriter
12-29-07, 06:13 PM
If you're really lucky, your insurance rates will go down a bit. Have a good one!

Ranger
12-29-07, 06:18 PM
Happy Birthday :cake:

RightTurn
12-29-07, 06:23 PM
:bdmuffin: :cheer: :nik: :nik: :cheer: :bdmuffin:
:rave::rave:
:nanaparty::nanaparty::nanaparty:

Happy Birthday!!

N0DIH
12-29-07, 06:36 PM
Mine went down more when I turned 21 than when I turned 25. Hope it does for you, make sure you call them to be sure to get the lower rates!

Happy Birthday! And thanks much for your service in the Service to protect and guard our great country!! I spent 8 years in the Army, and I sure love to know that the legacy of our Soldiers, Sailors, Aarines and Airmen continues on!

93DevilleUSMC
12-30-07, 06:21 AM
Happy Birthday!!
I remember my 21st. Before then, I was able to drink on base and overseas, but when I got stationed back at MCAS El Toro in CA I had to wait until I was legal to have a drink in town.

Semper Fi

I guess you must've gotten hammered on your 21st? What's the story behind that? Semper Fi to you, too!


This is the last important birthday you'll get to experience for 19 years, so enjoy it while you can! Happy Birthday!

Yeah, the next one is the big, dreaded 4-0. I'd better enjoy the ladies while I don't need Peter North pills. ;-)


:bdmuffin::cake:

Have a good one. :cheers:
A toast to you, too, sir! Hey, speaking of 21, I can buy a weapon now. :-)


If you're really lucky, your insurance rates will go down a bit. Have a good one!

Let's hope so, and thanks!


Happy Birthday :cake:

Thanks, man!



:bdmuffin: :cheer: :nik: :nik: :cheer: :bdmuffin:
:rave::rave:
:nanaparty::nanaparty::nanaparty:

Happy Birthday!!
Thank you much!


Mine went down more when I turned 21 than when I turned 25. Hope it does for you, make sure you call them to be sure to get the lower rates!

Happy Birthday! And thanks much for your service in the Service to protect and guard our great country!! I spent 8 years in the Army, and I sure love to know that the legacy of our Soldiers, Sailors, Aarines and Airmen continues on!

I didn't know you were prior Army! Thanks for serving, and for building up your part of that legacy you mentioned. God Bless!

My birthday was so awesome...I got to hang out with a girl I know and her family and watch Liddell tear Silva a new one, and watch St.-Pierre rip Hughes' arm off! (Those who know what I'm talking about, and/or saw the event, repost!)

Thanks to all for the birthday wishes!

N0DIH
12-30-07, 10:11 AM
....
I didn't know you were prior Army! Thanks for serving, and for building up your part of that legacy you mentioned. God Bless!

My birthday was so awesome...I got to hang out with a girl I know and her family and watch Liddell tear Silva a new one, and watch St.-Pierre rip Hughes' arm off! (Those who know what I'm talking about, and/or saw the event, repost!)

Thanks to all for the birthday wishes!


Yup, spent 8 years in "Target Acquisition Radar Support", and actually one of my all time best instructors was a Marine. Got his E8 while I was one of his students. We had 3 Marines going through an Army school, with all Army/Civillian instructors and the one Marine. He was great. And a car guy too! We talked and got him started on a 80 T/A with a 455 swap/buildup, but some neighbors in gov quarters complained.... Idiots, had a nice black Bandit T/A he found too.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-30-07, 03:23 PM
Yeah, the next one is the big, dreaded 4-0. I'd better enjoy the ladies while I don't need Peter North pills. ;-)


Say what you will about Peter North's pills, I enjoy taking those now on a daily basis.

93DevilleUSMC
12-30-07, 07:41 PM
Yup, spent 8 years in "Target Acquisition Radar Support", and actually one of my all time best instructors was a Marine. Got his E8 while I was one of his students. We had 3 Marines going through an Army school, with all Army/Civillian instructors and the one Marine. He was great. And a car guy too! We talked and got him started on a 80 T/A with a 455 swap/buildup, but some neighbors in gov quarters complained.... Idiots, had a nice black Bandit T/A he found too.

Target Acquisition Radar Support; is that related to Artillery or Air Defense, or some combo of both? By the way, was that Marine an E-8 Master Sergeant or an E-8 First Sergeant?

T/A; TransAm?

93DevilleUSMC
12-30-07, 07:42 PM
Say what you will about Peter North's pills, I enjoy taking those now on a daily basis.

Hahahaha I should use that as a sig!

JimHare
12-30-07, 07:57 PM
21? Sheeeeeeit, I have clothes older than that. :)

But HB anyway. Be careful, enjoy yourself, and let's hope you have another 60 or so..

N0DIH
12-30-07, 08:51 PM
Arty, I worked on AN/TPQ-36's and AN/TPQ-37's, as well as others like AN/PPS-5, AN/TPS-25, AN/TPS-58, AN/TRS-2, and the M90 Radar Chronograph. You have Marines who probably do the same thing and they are all Army trained from Ft. Sill.

Master, he wasn't in a command position there, but if he PCS'd to a new station I am sure he would be Top. I wouldn't be surprised if he is still in an a CSM by now. Wish I could remember his name, cool guy. He got promoted while we were in school, so it took some getting used to.

Apparently Marines who get chosen for Radar are pretty rare indeed, you don't get a choice (back then at least) so if you got sent to Radar school you were one of a VERY small group of Marines. In the Army we had only 70 of us WORLDWIDE, so you can imagine the Marines had less, I had heard only 8 WW.

The Q37's were my baby, something the Marines DON;T want, good for long distance battlefield, but a big handful to deal with. The Q36's were very good for the Marines. The class I was with was the LAST class to get only Q36 training.


Target Acquisition Radar Support; is that related to Artillery or Air Defense, or some combo of both? By the way, was that Marine an E-8 Master Sergeant or an E-8 First Sergeant?

T/A; TransAm?

93DevilleUSMC
12-31-07, 01:17 AM
21? Sheeeeeeit, I have clothes older than that. :)

But HB anyway. Be careful, enjoy yourself, and let's hope you have another 60 or so..

Thanks, I certainly will!

93DevilleUSMC
12-31-07, 01:37 AM
Arty, I worked on AN/TPQ-36's and AN/TPQ-37's, as well as others like AN/PPS-5, AN/TPS-25, AN/TPS-58, AN/TRS-2, and the M90 Radar Chronograph. You have Marines who probably do the same thing and they are all Army trained from Ft. Sill.

Master, he wasn't in a command position there, but if he PCS'd to a new station I am sure he would be Top. I wouldn't be surprised if he is still in an a CSM by now. Wish I could remember his name, cool guy. He got promoted while we were in school, so it took some getting used to.

Apparently Marines who get chosen for Radar are pretty rare indeed, you don't get a choice (back then at least) so if you got sent to Radar school you were one of a VERY small group of Marines. In the Army we had only 70 of us WORLDWIDE, so you can imagine the Marines had less, I had heard only 8 WW.

The Q37's were my baby, something the Marines DON;T want, good for long distance battlefield, but a big handful to deal with. The Q36's were very good for the Marines. The class I was with was the LAST class to get only Q36 training.

Yeah, we probably do have Marines who do that. In fact, I'm certain there are just because of the HIMARS system the Corps is using now. HIMARS is to the Corps what MLRS is to the Army. However, it would not surprise me at all to hear that that particular MOS has been eliminated.

Isn't the Q36 used to track enemy arty strikes and trace the shells back to the enemy`s own cannons?

N0DIH
12-31-07, 03:50 PM
Sir, yes sir!

Yup, Q36 is generally intended to work closer in with lighter units (brigade level) and mortars, etc.

The Q37 is the longer range, can track missiles even with right software and V8 mods. The Q37 is the monster, stupid amounts of RF power (billions of watts!) and can track just about anything that flies in a ballistic trajectory. Considered a Corps asset, typically stays with the MLS (and now HIMARS most likely). Gotta have the good range.

Is MLS being phased out? Wow, that was "new" when I was in! They were phasing IN MLS to replace much of the older non Paladin M109's (Paladins and HIP's were out yet). I can say in Gulf War I the MLS was able to drop a LOT of ordinace on the enemy. I have lots of video footage of it when I was there, a couple people brought cameras. Nothing like what is going on today. But what is going on today, is what we were truly expecting to happen then.

Both radars do "friendly" and "hostile" file (incoming or outgoing) to do radar registrations (track how accurately the guns are) or track the bad guys firing on you and you can send back fire before they even hit the ground.

Radar is key, "eyes of thunder" (another one of my screen names, just can't recall where!), as Artillery is often known as Thunder, EyesofThunder is often what radar is called. Of course a friend of mine who was a forward observer might not like that, as that is what he was too!

I just fixed the darn things, I was 2nd and 3rd shop (DS and GS repair) and key to the Depot repair on site if it went down. We didn't send back to Depot unless it was catastrophic. Else Depot came to us and assisted DS/GS (me).


Yeah, we probably do have Marines who do that. In fact, I'm certain there are just because of the HIMARS system the Corps is using now. HIMARS is to the Corps what MLRS is to the Army. However, it would not surprise me at all to hear that that particular MOS has been eliminated.

Isn't the Q36 used to track enemy arty strikes and trace the shells back to the enemy`s own cannons?

93DevilleUSMC
12-31-07, 10:24 PM
Sir, yes sir!

Yup, Q36 is generally intended to work closer in with lighter units (brigade level) and mortars, etc.

The Q37 is the longer range, can track missiles even with right software and V8 mods. The Q37 is the monster, stupid amounts of RF power (billions of watts!) and can track just about anything that flies in a ballistic trajectory. Considered a Corps asset, typically stays with the MLS (and now HIMARS most likely). Gotta have the good range.

Is MLS being phased out? Wow, that was "new" when I was in! They were phasing IN MLS to replace much of the older non Paladin M109's (Paladins and HIP's were out yet). I can say in Gulf War I the MLS was able to drop a LOT of ordinace on the enemy. I have lots of video footage of it when I was there, a couple people brought cameras. Nothing like what is going on today. But what is going on today, is what we were truly expecting to happen then.

Both radars do "friendly" and "hostile" file (incoming or outgoing) to do radar registrations (track how accurately the guns are) or track the bad guys firing on you and you can send back fire before they even hit the ground.

Radar is key, "eyes of thunder" (another one of my screen names, just can't recall where!), as Artillery is often known as Thunder, EyesofThunder is often what radar is called. Of course a friend of mine who was a forward observer might not like that, as that is what he was too!

I just fixed the darn things, I was 2nd and 3rd shop (DS and GS repair) and key to the Depot repair on site if it went down. We didn't send back to Depot unless it was catastrophic. Else Depot came to us and assisted DS/GS (me).

No, MLRS isn't being phased out. I said "MOS" meaning "Military Occupational Specialty".

So, the Q36 would be really good for finding an insurgent position after they do a mortar attack. The Q37 could do the same thing, but it's really good for locating divisional artillery and ordering it wasted. Do I have that about right?

The former CO of my Civil Air Patrol unit, a retired Army major, was a cannon cocker during the first Gulf War. He used to tell me about how the MLRS used to blow square kilometers of enemy off of the map with one volley. :)

When I go back in, I would love to go Artillery.

Ranger
12-31-07, 11:20 PM
When I go back in, I would love to go Artillery.
You're going back?

93DevilleUSMC
12-31-07, 11:28 PM
You're going back?

I'm planning to, yes. I haven't decided which service, or if I'll be going into a police department. Either way, my 21st year is going to an interesting one..

Ranger
12-31-07, 11:54 PM
Then that begs the question, why did you get out?

93DevilleUSMC
01-01-08, 12:03 AM
Then that begs the question, why did you get out?

I got out because of a hip fracture.

N0DIH
01-01-08, 04:44 AM
Owch!

Hope you get better soon!

I never worked much with the Arty guys (13B is the MOS #, or 13 Bang Bang as we called them), but seeing them boys out down range launching projo's was awesome. Back in the rear they were not doing a whole lot, but in the field, they were having a blast (pun intended)....

Can we say Copperheads? Yeah! Those are some neat rounds. Or ATACMS too (for MLRS).


I got out because of a hip fracture.

93DevilleUSMC
01-01-08, 07:15 AM
Owch!

Hope you get better soon!

I never worked much with the Arty guys (13B is the MOS #, or 13 Bang Bang as we called them), but seeing them boys out down range launching projo's was awesome. Back in the rear they were not doing a whole lot, but in the field, they were having a blast (pun intended)....

Can we say Copperheads? Yeah! Those are some neat rounds. Or ATACMS too (for MLRS).

I'm getting there! I was discharged on 1 August 2006. I still have some pain, but it's getting better. I was limping when they sent me home. I don't limp anymore. I'll have to tell that story in a member introduction, which I haven't done yet.

Apparently the U.S. Army also has the HIMARS, as well as the Marine Corps. This article doesn't specifically say that the HIMARS is in the Army's inventory, but it does say that the Marine Corps arranged with the Army to buy 40 of these. That's unusual, because normally the Corps buys through the Navy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Mobility_Artillery_Rocket_System

Also, here's an article on the Copperhead.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M712_Copperhead

N0DIH
01-01-08, 01:07 PM
Glad you aren't limping anymore, any pain still? When I was in anyone getting a medical discharge was pretty rare, but with the service changing how it is, almost too commonplace. Wow. Such a change.

It was always interesting on the radio when they did a Copperhead fire. "Copperhead! Copperhead! Copperhead!" was announced first, the FISTer's had the target painted and off it went. The Arty's guided bomb essentially, launched from a M109 or similar tube. Pretty cool. So wonder how much different Excalibur is? Hmmmm, things are changing so much. And in only 11.5 years since I got out. But I know they were still deploying changed that they learned from Desert Storm. The MLRS trailers and Q37 trailers were 2 big changes for us.

Are the MLS being phased out, or just being left to the heavy Armor divisions? I was in 1st Armor Division (Old Ironsides). We were very heavy with M1's and Artillery/MLRS, and in 1990, supposed to be much heavier MLRS, but we ended up getting deployed to the Gulf and didn't get the MLRS rollout. We were turning significant numbers of M109's to become MLRS's.

If anyone wants to see an ATACMS launch
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Army_mlrs_1982_02.jpg

Or a live MLRS launch (we did launches in Iraq like this only with 30-60 launchers at a time!)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HPApt0hbaU&feature=related

I got to see these in person up on a mountain in Iraq looking down at 3rd Armored Division. We thought it was strange 2 "SPILS" were sitting back a ways, and then they launched.... COOL! 2 stage missile. The second stage launched in the clouds at night, very COOL!

another single rocket launch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brkrybAm8f4

Now, in the Gulf, these babies fired almost continuously for a few DAYS.... We even got a broken fin on a rocket and it took off at some bizzare angle (straight up), got that on tape too. I'll try to see if I can figure out how to get the footage to the net....

N0DIH
01-01-08, 01:58 PM
Not sure why the youtube links aren't working...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HPApt0hbaU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brkrybAm8f4

93DevilleUSMC
01-02-08, 02:12 AM
Not sure why the youtube links aren't working...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HPApt0hbaU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brkrybAm8f4

That's about 8,000 munitions dropped on a grid square, or even a smaller target, and all 8,000 of these nasty things are each seeking out human and vehicle targets to fall on. :cool:

N0DIH
01-02-08, 02:16 AM
Yes, the do, and the morons who find the unexploded ones and carry them in their cargo pockets were not exactly the brightest light bulbs in the bunch..... Legs go by by that way. Tires blown off rims. Even 2 idiots tried to play catch with one.... Yeah, they say around 5% don't go off. So don't stick around there once the area has been peppered with them.

Even if you are in a tank, you are gonna get one heck of a headache from them.

93DevilleUSMC
01-02-08, 03:47 AM
[QUOTE=N0DIH;1348210]Yes, the do, and the morons who find the unexploded ones and carry them in their cargo pockets were not exactly the brightest light bulbs in the bunch..... Legs go by by that way. Tires blown off rims. Even 2 idiots tried to play catch with one.... Yeah, they say around 5% don't go off. So don't stick around there once the area has been peppered with them.

Even if you are in a tank, you are gonna get one heck of a headache from them.[/quote

Let me guess; these morons were Iraqi Regulars? Carrying unexploded ordinance in the cargo pockets sounds like something one of them would have done.

ewill3rd
01-02-08, 09:32 AM
Sorry I am late on this one.
Is it possible to offer a belated "Happy Birthday" or at least ask how it was?

I vaguely recall 21, not really though. I am on the cusp of that "19 year later" birthday mentioned previously.

The main reason I am posting is to offer my appreciation for your service. My dad did 20 in the USAF and his health is faltering, but I am proud of what he did for his country, and for what you did too!
God bless you sir.

N0DIH
01-02-08, 02:38 PM
Nope, they were US Army (non Arty guys who were in HHQ Divarty, they never saw them before, supply people, desk jockeys, etc. Idiots....) I had never even heard of them before then, but I wasn't messing with jack, I was a couple years working on AH1 Cobras, on Armament (I was the guy who loaded missles, rockets and guns, and did all the work on them). Word spread like wildfire of them. Mainly for me I was working with the Radars and very close to the MLRS (lets see, Flash and Boom time wise, was almost indistingishable.... that is how close!)


...Let me guess; these morons were Iraqi Regulars? Carrying unexploded ordinance in the cargo pockets sounds like something one of them would have done.

When I was in, Iraqi regulars were the bad guys.... Most surrendered to us, which was a REAL pain in the posterior... You are prepared to do your job, but are you prepared to do your job and have 50-100 enemy combatants surrendered to you? And STILL do your job? Yeah, things were a mess. Most of the time they had to disarm them and then send them south. Nothing we could do....

ewill3rd
01-02-08, 06:24 PM
BTW, my thanks go out to all you guys who have served. Even the ones that served State Side.
It is still honorable, and appreciated.

93DevilleUSMC
01-03-08, 04:45 AM
Sorry I am late on this one.
Is it possible to offer a belated "Happy Birthday" or at least ask how it was?

I vaguely recall 21, not really though. I am on the cusp of that "19 year later" birthday mentioned previously.

The main reason I am posting is to offer my appreciation for your service. My dad did 20 in the USAF and his health is faltering, but I am proud of what he did for his country, and for what you did too!
God bless you sir.


BTW, my thanks go out to all you guys who have served. Even the ones that served State Side.
It is still honorable, and appreciated.


Thanks for the birthday wishes! For my birthday, I watched George Saint-Pierre beat the crap out of Matt Hughes.

Thanks also for the appreciation of service comments. Tell your Dad that I said the same.

93DevilleUSMC
01-03-08, 04:52 AM
Nope, they were US Army (non Arty guys who were in HHQ Divarty, they never saw them before, supply people, desk jockeys, etc. Idiots....) I had never even heard of them before then, but I wasn't messing with jack, I was a couple years working on AH1 Cobras, on Armament (I was the guy who loaded missles, rockets and guns, and did all the work on them). Word spread like wildfire of them. Mainly for me I was working with the Radars and very close to the MLRS (lets see, Flash and Boom time wise, was almost indistingishable.... that is how close!)



When I was in, Iraqi regulars were the bad guys.... Most surrendered to us, which was a REAL pain in the posterior... You are prepared to do your job, but are you prepared to do your job and have 50-100 enemy combatants surrendered to you? And STILL do your job? Yeah, things were a mess. Most of the time they had to disarm them and then send them south. Nothing we could do....


Haha lol...wow. The bit about the mines in the pockets is funny in a cruel and unusual way, but darkly funny nonetheless.

How many POWs did your unit have to deal with?

N0DIH
01-03-08, 01:06 PM
In combat the unit I was attached to (B/25FA) almost gets disbanded, basically each and all Radars take off to the their respective combat assignments, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Brigades for the Q36's and the MLRS BN's for the Q37's. I was DS/GS support (basically your job at the dealer would be DS/GS support, you can do anything to the car short of a factory rebuild), and then we would have Depot come to use or send the Radar to Depot if it is that bad, but that is pretty rare, usually they came to us. Supply, HQ, Maintenance (vehicles, like the tow truck, motor pool guys, etc), NBC (Nuke, Bio, Chem), etc stayed together. We stayed with them, as we were more or less central to all Radars, we typically stayed closer to the Q37's as they were most problem prone. The brigade units got quite a few, they were out much farther, typically with us they kept steering us away from the POW's, so personally, I never did see them, but the Radar operators had a lot, drive them batty and was scary, you just didn't know if someone was wired up or not, and they had fire missions to run, they really got messed up having to worry about that. No one spoke a word of Iraqi at all, no translators at all around (we were WAAAY to far away for translators to come to us). The radar sections are fairly thin, we don't have extra manpower for security. The "plan" was always we would get a group of 11B's to stay with the Radars to provide that security, or MP's, but it never happened that way once the poop hit the fan. We did get Chapparels (now replaced with Avengers), so we have AAA, Air Attack Artillery with us (that helped) and early on we had a lot of A10's that hung around, but once we started firing MLRS, they split. The Chaparels were slow and cumbersome, they had a real hard time keeping up with the wheeled vehicles, they had old tracks that would tough to do 25 mph. Glad they got replaced.....

We had a few casualties, those boneheads, and one guy stepped on a land mine and got hurt (we were in the midst of minefields), and we lost 1 ammo filled tank to a land mine. It burned for hours. Nothing we could do, no fire dept to call..... That was one hot fire too. One guy (a medic) fell into our trash pit (20x20x10 feet) at night and really screwed up his arm. It was soooo black at night, you could not see a thing. And you didn't dare use lights, those could be seen by the enemy. So he misjudged where he was and got hurt for it. They used 2 shots of morphine on him for the pain, he got sent back to Germany where we were out of.

Heck I even got lost driving out there at night, it was sooo black one night, they had the only night vision (NODS) out on a guard point and we didn't get them that night, and we left one guard point to get to another only a mile away and never found the second one. We must have been off a couple degrees, and then trying to find it, we got even more messed up. We had a compass, but that didn't help much at all. We ended up 10+ miles off course in 2 hours. I finally saw a convoy and just jumped in, and later found my way back. Messy of a night. Got shot at by a bedowin when we came up on his goats and sheep! We split in a hurry! The desert is not like any place you have ever driven at night. Flat nothing out there, just barren and featureless.

93DevilleUSMC
01-04-08, 07:28 AM
In combat the unit I was attached to (B/25FA) almost gets disbanded, basically each and all Radars take off to the their respective combat assignments, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Brigades for the Q36's and the MLRS BN's for the Q37's. I was DS/GS support (basically your job at the dealer would be DS/GS support, you can do anything to the car short of a factory rebuild), and then we would have Depot come to use or send the Radar to Depot if it is that bad, but that is pretty rare, usually they came to us. Supply, HQ, Maintenance (vehicles, like the tow truck, motor pool guys, etc), NBC (Nuke, Bio, Chem), etc stayed together. We stayed with them, as we were more or less central to all Radars, we typically stayed closer to the Q37's as they were most problem prone. The brigade units got quite a few, they were out much farther, typically with us they kept steering us away from the POW's, so personally, I never did see them, but the Radar operators had a lot, drive them batty and was scary, you just didn't know if someone was wired up or not, and they had fire missions to run, they really got messed up having to worry about that. No one spoke a word of Iraqi at all, no translators at all around (we were WAAAY to far away for translators to come to us). The radar sections are fairly thin, we don't have extra manpower for security. The "plan" was always we would get a group of 11B's to stay with the Radars to provide that security, or MP's, but it never happened that way once the poop hit the fan. We did get Chapparels (now replaced with Avengers), so we have AAA, Air Attack Artillery with us (that helped) and early on we had a lot of A10's that hung around, but once we started firing MLRS, they split. The Chaparels were slow and cumbersome, they had a real hard time keeping up with the wheeled vehicles, they had old tracks that would tough to do 25 mph. Glad they got replaced.....

We had a few casualties, those boneheads, and one guy stepped on a land mine and got hurt (we were in the midst of minefields), and we lost 1 ammo filled tank to a land mine. It burned for hours. Nothing we could do, no fire dept to call..... That was one hot fire too. One guy (a medic) fell into our trash pit (20x20x10 feet) at night and really screwed up his arm. It was soooo black at night, you could not see a thing. And you didn't dare use lights, those could be seen by the enemy. So he misjudged where he was and got hurt for it. They used 2 shots of morphine on him for the pain, he got sent back to Germany where we were out of.

Heck I even got lost driving out there at night, it was sooo black one night, they had the only night vision (NODS) out on a guard point and we didn't get them that night, and we left one guard point to get to another only a mile away and never found the second one. We must have been off a couple degrees, and then trying to find it, we got even more messed up. We had a compass, but that didn't help much at all. We ended up 10+ miles off course in 2 hours. I finally saw a convoy and just jumped in, and later found my way back. Messy of a night. Got shot at by a bedowin when we came up on his goats and sheep! We split in a hurry! The desert is not like any place you have ever driven at night. Flat nothing out there, just barren and featureless.

So, if the Iraqis sent infantry to do a raid, you guys would have been in some trouble unless you got A-10s in fast. Did you guys ever get the minefield cleared?

How'd your medic make out on his injury? Did he get to stay in the Army?

My DIs used to make us stand completely still in the trees where the sand fleas where concentrated. The idea was to teach us not to give our positions away, which they said could be done by something as small as a scratch of your arm: I can imagine what a flashlight in pitch darkness would have done in terms of drawing fire. Did the enemy have anything close to that minefield?

EcSTSatic
01-04-08, 11:26 AM
I can imagine what a flashlight in pitch darkness would have done in terms of drawing fire. Did the enemy have anything close to that minefield?

That's where the "three on a match" story comes from. At night, by the time the 3rd grunt was lighting his cig from the same match, the enemy would have drawn down on him and he was toast.

93DevilleUSMC
01-04-08, 02:37 PM
That's where the "three on a match" story comes from. At night, by the time the 3rd grunt was lighting his cig from the same match, the enemy would have drawn down on him and he was toast.

Did you ever take fire because of something like that?

EcSTSatic
01-04-08, 02:48 PM
Did you ever take fire because of something like that?

No way. We were trained better than that. Even in boot camp the DI's demonstrated how easily a match could be seen far, far away at night.

N0DIH
01-04-08, 03:13 PM
We moved through many minefields, no idea if they ever got cleared. The M1's made way with the mine rakes, we followed. Don't deviate from the "safe" path. Honestly, you don't really train for this, isn't too hard, but remember, there is no communications between vehicle to vehicle. No radios, just sight, IF you can see someone well enough. So you learn quick that minefields are in your path as all of a sudden no one is making "extra tracks" and driving all over like officers and HMMWV's all to often do... Things are likely different now.

Our Col (full bird) ticked off the AF Col or Gen that was keeping the A10's around early on, because they had to clear them so we could do fire missions, so whatever was said, after the first day or so, they never came back. We had Apache's and Cobra's, so we had a killer air support (better than A10's in my book!) from 1AD already.

The medic got a trip back to Germany, I don't think I saw him again, but he likely was still in. I can't imagine it that bad, but you never know, he messed it up good, his arm was like bent up behind him. And he had to get out of the hole alone, in the dark, and no one knew he was there (late night). Not easy to be heard from a hole 10+ feet deep.... this was just before the ground war, so the only enemy around really was unknowns, bedowins, terrorists, etc but we didn't know if they were there or not. We retained a lot of them, but mainly we kept people out of the AO so they wouldn't get a chance to get in.

I can imagine the extra training the Marines do for the Infantry training needed, that would suck, but you need to be able to be in control of yourself, else you die. Simple as that. In my case, I wasn't Infantry, we worked electronics, we do the wrong thing, we get fried (I worked with 50KV @ 18 amps!), or hit (80 degree per sec slew rate of a XM97 Gun and M197 turret will WAKE you up, sometime into next week!). You learned, and you learned WELL. That was my only safety violation in school, I missed 1 switch in the cockpit, Pilot Override (I still remember!), and when I powered up the bird, the gun went to emergency stow.... NOT GOOD for me.... But could have hurt someone too.



So, if the Iraqis sent infantry to do a raid, you guys would have been in some trouble unless you got A-10s in fast. Did you guys ever get the minefield cleared?

How'd your medic make out on his injury? Did he get to stay in the Army?

My DIs used to make us stand completely still in the trees where the sand fleas where concentrated. The idea was to teach us not to give our positions away, which they said could be done by something as small as a scratch of your arm: I can imagine what a flashlight in pitch darkness would have done in terms of drawing fire. Did the enemy have anything close to that minefield?

93DevilleUSMC
01-04-08, 06:58 PM
No way. We were trained better than that. Even in boot camp the DI's demonstrated how easily a match could be seen far, far away at night.

Yeah, or even leaves being shifted by legs moving can be heard from hundreds of yards out.

N0DIH
01-04-08, 07:01 PM
We never really worried about noise, we have a 60KW generator running at 2000 rpm with blowers and stuff going on all the time. No way to be quiet with those 60KW Precise generators! They used a M35A2 engine basically.... But unless we opened the doors, it was all pretty dark. The main lights turned off with the doors, but the radar functions all stayed up, so it was pretty bright still...

Now a 30KW with a quiet kit? You could walk up on it at night and not hear it until you were 10 feet from it.... That is freaky....

93DevilleUSMC
01-04-08, 07:57 PM
We moved through many minefields, no idea if they ever got cleared. The M1's made way with the mine rakes, we followed. Don't deviate from the "safe" path. Honestly, you don't really train for this, isn't too hard, but remember, there is no communications between vehicle to vehicle. No radios, just sight, IF you can see someone well enough. So you learn quick that minefields are in your path as all of a sudden no one is making "extra tracks" and driving all over like officers and HMMWV's all to often do... Things are likely different now.

Our Col (full bird) ticked off the AF Col or Gen that was keeping the A10's around early on, because they had to clear them so we could do fire missions, so whatever was said, after the first day or so, they never came back. We had Apache's and Cobra's, so we had a killer air support (better than A10's in my book!) from 1AD already.

The medic got a trip back to Germany, I don't think I saw him again, but he likely was still in. I can't imagine it that bad, but you never know, he messed it up good, his arm was like bent up behind him. And he had to get out of the hole alone, in the dark, and no one knew he was there (late night). Not easy to be heard from a hole 10+ feet deep.... this was just before the ground war, so the only enemy around really was unknowns, bedowins, terrorists, etc but we didn't know if they were there or not. We retained a lot of them, but mainly we kept people out of the AO so they wouldn't get a chance to get in.

I can imagine the extra training the Marines do for the Infantry training needed, that would suck, but you need to be able to be in control of yourself, else you die. Simple as that. In my case, I wasn't Infantry, we worked electronics, we do the wrong thing, we get fried (I worked with 50KV @ 18 amps!), or hit (80 degree per sec slew rate of a XM97 Gun and M197 turret will WAKE you up, sometime into next week!). You learned, and you learned WELL. That was my only safety violation in school, I missed 1 switch in the cockpit, Pilot Override (I still remember!), and when I powered up the bird, the gun went to emergency stow.... NOT GOOD for me.... But could have hurt someone too.

Yeah, the training does suck, but it's supposed to. It takes the most stressful yet safe conditions to teach you how to survive in the most stressful and worst conditions of combat. I'm sure that it sucked when you got ass-chewed for missing that switch, but like you said, you never made that mistake again.

Well, hopefully they let that medic do rehab at Walter Reed or somewhere.