: Cable or DSL? Which high speed internet access is better?



BeelzeBob
05-07-04, 10:45 AM
Okay. I'm pretty-sure I already know the answer to this question. Cable is better.. But can anyone provide me with some specifics? Where I'm moving to, there's no cable. So now, if I'm lucky and they have DSL in my area, I can get that.. What am I in for?

RBraczyk
05-07-04, 10:54 AM
I have DSL and its an anusload better than Cable. Just as fast if not faster at times. DSL never goes down unlike cable. Easier connection. Smoother than cable, meaning less fluctuation. In the perfect environment cable is better, but for most people, DSL is king. I like it more than cable. Then again its Adelphia. Oh well, DSL is better.

BeelzeBob
05-07-04, 11:15 AM
I'll probably be looking at Bell South DSL with up to 3Mbps downstream X 384Kbps upstream.

RBraczyk
05-07-04, 11:18 AM
Go for it.

juiceE
05-07-04, 12:02 PM
cable connection can get slower the more ppl are on it in your area.
... personally, my DSL is fast... i usually download @ 170k

Msilva954
05-07-04, 12:05 PM
We have Bell South DSL.....and we have actually never had a problem with it....we have gone from Cable to DSL numerous times and I think that the DSL actually works better 75% of the time.

BeelzeBob
05-07-04, 12:34 PM
I know it also depends on how close you are to the phone company.. Hopefully I wont be too far to get fast service...

RBraczyk
05-07-04, 01:07 PM
Distance from cable company is the same as well.

brougham
05-07-04, 02:13 PM
I know someone who used to be a service advisor for internet companies. He liked DSL a lot better then cable.

We've had DSL for around 3 years now. In that time we might have had a problem with the internet once that it wasn't working at all. It was their fault and aparently it was something that broke in their network somewhere and affected a lot of people. It got fixed pretty quick. We have the 3MB download and 800kb upload service.

tru504187211
05-07-04, 02:53 PM
I've had cable for about 2 years now, and it has gone down in those two years for a grand total of about...maybe 5 times? Its ridiculously reliable in my area, even during peak times of use. I also like the idea of cable being more so of a 'plug and play' type setup. Never too slow for me either. I've also had only pleasent experiences with support the few times it has gone down.

BeelzeBob
05-07-04, 04:09 PM
Unfortunately, I can't get the extra-fast high-speed DSL service in the area I'm moving into. So instead of up to 3Mbps/384Kbps, I get up to 1.5Mbps/256Kbps.

I hope this is close to what I'm getting now with Optimimum Online cable...

shaggygrosser
05-07-04, 05:28 PM
I own my cable modem, so it just makes sense to keep on keepin' on with cable service.

I used to work for SBC DSL tech support to get myself through college... so there's a few things that I know that everyone should know about DSL service. If you're not close enough to the telephone company (trunk), then good luck. Because then there's the chance you'll have to connect to a remote terminal (basically a repeater). I've had a lot of calls about horrible speeds and noticed that most of them were remote terminal connections. I might not have the terminology correct, being that it's been a few years since I've worked that job.

Pimpin_Whity
05-07-04, 05:40 PM
to answer your question i took out a 3-year old MaximumPC magazine :bonkers: (that's when 32mb TNT2 cars were hot :disappoin), but broadband internet hasn't changed much. you answered the question yourself, cable is alot faster then the fastest DSL both ways, while it is more asymetrical.

here is the "cruising speed" of cable and various DSLs, crusising speed is like that 56k the cap on speed you can get on 56k modems, but i got 5mbps downloads from nice servers (i have Optimum Online, which is Cable).

download/upload
ADSL (most common) - 128kbps/64kbps to 1.5mbps/768kbps
SDSL (best for servers) - 128kbps/128kbps to 1.5mbp/1.5mbps
IDSL (ISDN) - 128mbps/128mbps
HDSL (high-speed DSL) - 1.5mbps/1.5mbps
G.LITE (Satellite) - 128kbps/64kbps to 1.5mbps/768kbps
Cable - 1mbps/33.6kbps to 27mbps/10mbps

this is a part of an article in MaxiumPC
Although the term “broadband” is an umbrella description for any sort of high-speed net access (including satellite and, arguably, ISDN, both of which are discussed below), you’ll likely be choosing between one of two services: cable or digital subscriber line (DSL). Which you invite into your home will depend partially on your computing habits, but more on what services are available in your little corner of the globe.
If you have access to both services and you’re primarily interested in the fastest downloads possible, go for cable, which have very high theoretical throughput. Throughput measures the amount of data that can be moved across a connection in a given time period; it’s usually represented in kilobits per second (Kbps) or megabits per second (Mbps). Know, however, that because all households on cable node (usually around 30 or 40 homes) share the same finite amount of bandwidth, cable users on busy nodes typically end up with significantly slower connections. To minimize this problem, most cable companies cap upstream bandwidth at 128kbps.

This cap, combined with the shared bandwidth problem, makes cable a poor choice for anyone who wants to run a web or FTP server—your slow upstream speeds will drive your online visitors insane. In fact, most cable providers specifically forbid any sort of server software on their connections (back in the day). So if you’re intent on uploading large volumes of data be sure your prospective cable provider won’t balk. And if many people on your block already have cable internet service, ask them if their download speed during peak hours (typically weekday nights when everyone’s home from school and work) even approach those advertised. If their cable modems perform more like 56k modems because everyone’s sucking on the node at the same time, wait for DSL to hit your neighborhood (again, this is back in the day and the cap on speed is actually a lot higher now and affecting less households, but this may vary from company to company).

Aside from a multitude of technological differences, the biggest difference between Cable and DSL is that you don’t share your DSL connection with anyone else in the neighborhood. Overall, DSL offers slower peak connection speeds than Cable, but DSL connections usually have lower latency then cable connection (latency is the amount of time it takes data to get from your computer to the internet; it’s measured in milliseconds [ms], and it’s the number to watch if you’re concerned about ping times in online gaming). DSL is available in a few different flavors—not all of which are equally appealing. Which you’re offered will depend on how fare you’re located from the phone company’s Central Office (CO).

The asynchronous digital subscriber line (ADSL) is the most popular DSL option because it offers home users the best value for their buck. ADSL usually offers faster downloads than uploads, which is just peachy for most people since home users download far more information then they upload. ADSL’s maximum upload and download rates drop as you get further from your CO, and most ISPs won’t even attempt to install ADSL if you live more than 18,000 feet from your CO.

Another popular choice, the synchronous digital subscriber line (SDSL), offers equally fast upload and download rates. SDSL connections are usually more expensive the ADSL connections, but SDSL is the ultimate for a gamer, since synchronous connections allow for much lower pings than even normal ADSL lines can. It’s also the best choice if you’re looking to run a game, web, or file-sharing server, because of the high upload speeds it provides—we recommend 256kbps as a minimum upload speed if you’re looking to host a server. You’ll also need to find an ISP that doesn’t object to you running a server—perhaps the most difficult part of the process. SDSL is subject to the same 18,000-foot limitation that affects ADSL.

So, what are your options if your home is, in fact, located further that 18,000 feet from your phone company’s CO? if you have an extra few hundred dollars a moth at your disposal, consider a high speed subscriber line (HDSL). HDSL delivers the T1 lines used by ISPs and businesses, and offers very high reliability. HDSL lines are also compatible with repeater hardware beyond 20,000 feet, or case you live far, far away from your CO. If that’s too rich for your blood, check out an ISDN digital subscriber line (IDSL)—a replacement for standard ISDN. While it doesn’t offer the speed of other DSLs, IDSL works well beyond the normal range of other DSLs—up to 50,000 feet, in fact.

Once you’ve wound your way through the cable versus DSL decision, it’s time to choose a service provider—or to get in touch with the single provider serving your area. But even if that choice is dictated more by default than by decision, there are some basic feature your service should include. Fund out in advance what kind of modem you get, whether you can get a static IP instead of a dynamic one, and whether the ISP uses Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE). Static IPs are useful if you plan to host a server or remotely access your home computer from work. PPPoE is another way to assign in IP address, but requires special software that your ISP will have to provide.

sorry for writing so much, but you asked :rolleyes2
hope this helps :)

RBraczyk
05-07-04, 06:43 PM
Go satellite high speed internet Sal.

Brett
05-07-04, 06:59 PM
verizon is laying hdsl lines throghout my subdivision now, they said it will be one of the first residential communities wired for it.....:)

of course they are probably full of crap...either way they said the new service will be virtually limitless speedwise

in my office i have the cable modem.....cause cable tv in the office is very nice :D

gothicaleigh
05-07-04, 08:06 PM
Go satellite high speed internet Sal.


I agree. Satellite was my best option at the time, but now that I have it, I don't think I would even consider Cable. This is fast.

Vesicant
05-07-04, 08:19 PM
Go satellite high speed internet Sal.
Try not to even consider satellite internet. Usually you get slow download and slow upload speeds , can be very expensive and goes out if theres bad clouds/rain/snow. Its really meant for if theres absolutely no option for any internet service around. Like if you live in a desert.

DSL would be a good choice, even though Cable is usually a better one but apparently cant get it in your area. I would want to make sure DSL is available in your area and what the distance is away from the transmitting station. They will have to put a fiber optic line into your house. Reasonable speeds, but prices can get hefty due to the fact that they have variable options for different speeds.

gothicaleigh
05-07-04, 08:37 PM
Try not to even consider satellite internet. Usually you get slow download and slow upload speeds , can be very expensive and goes out if theres bad clouds/rain/snow. Its really meant for if theres absolutely no option for any internet service around. Like if you live in a desert.

DSL would be a good choice, even though Cable is usually a better one but apparently cant get it in your area. I would want to make sure DSL is available in your area and what the distance is away from the transmitting station. They will have to put a fiber optic line into your house. Reasonable speeds, but prices can get hefty due to the fact that they have variable options for different speeds.

Have you ever used satellite?

The downloads have never been slow and the uploads, while absolutely horrible on older versions, have incredibly improved. The myth about it going out all the time reminds me of those rediculous commercials that the cable companies air about satellite TV. Will you lose your connection in a blizzard? Yes. Other than that, I haven't experienced a problem with mine(and we get more than our share of bad weather by the lake here in Michigan).

Elvis
05-07-04, 08:39 PM
I've had cable for about 2 years now, and it has gone down in those two years for a grand total of about...maybe 5 times? Its ridiculously reliable in my area, even during peak times of use. I also like the idea of cable being more so of a 'plug and play' type setup. Never too slow for me either. I've also had only pleasent experiences with support the few times it has gone down.

Same story here, but I've only been down twice. Once was because of a killer storm that ripped through here in July last year.

Pimpin_Whity
05-07-04, 08:47 PM
if you read my post, you probably found out that it all depends on your situation. if you're close to the ISPs CO then get SDSL if not and Cable is available, get Cable. my post was based on old info, and i realize that satalite has improved drastically and could be one of the top choices, but nothing beats HDSL which is available on demand if you have ADSL or SDSL in your area though (HDSL is T1 if you didn't read that big post)

elwesso
05-08-04, 12:02 AM
I like cable. I can easily get 2mbps most times, and have seen higher.

In 4 years we've had it, its gone out like 2 times...

c5 rv
05-08-04, 12:07 AM
From a security perspective, DSL is superior as you have a private connection to the central office. On cable, it is possible for other persons on your segment to read your packets if they have an interface that can run in promiscuous mode (passes the computer all packets, no just ones addressed to it) or if they have a packet sniffer. I live too far from town for DSL and use Comcast cable. Service has been mainly good.

elwesso
05-08-04, 12:11 AM
That would be the same type of people that drive by your house if yo uhave a wireless router...

IMO nothing is secure on the internet any more.

BeelzeBob
05-08-04, 11:32 AM
I'm renting a condo that doesn't allow dishes... So the only options I have are dialup or DSL... Even when cable does become available - it'll be Adelphia - which I never hear anything good about...

Brett
05-08-04, 12:15 PM
I'm renting a condo that doesn't allow dishes.
fcc law dictates landlords cant stop you from having a dish

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html#QA

Pimpin_Whity
05-08-04, 12:56 PM
I'm renting a condo that doesn't allow dishes... So the only options I have are dialup or DSL... Even when cable does become available - it'll be Adelphia - which I never hear anything good about...
i understand that you hoslt this website yourself. if you do then get SDSL or if you have the cash get HDSL, it'll be better then optimum online if you live close enough to the CO of the ISP.

BeelzeBob
05-08-04, 01:23 PM
fcc law dictates landlords cant stop you from having a dish

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html#QA
I wonder if I should rock the boat.. Maybe I will.. Which satellite service should I look into?

Pimpin_Whity
05-08-04, 03:40 PM
satellite is not going to be faster then regular DSL though, which is slower then Optimum Online. and i heard that sometimes you have to upload through a 56k modem, so you should ask about that if you decide to go with it.

gothicaleigh
05-08-04, 04:30 PM
Again, you're thinking of older versions of satellite.
The new equipment is much faster than DSL and you never have to connect to your computer's modem.

I use:
http://www.direcway.com/

ThomasO
05-08-04, 07:07 PM
I have excellent service from Bellsouth, Fast Access DSL

Realtor1
08-14-04, 01:50 PM
cable connection can get slower the more ppl are on it in your area.
... personally, my DSL is fast... i usually download @ 170k


I download at about 380k to 395k with comcast cable...I have DSL at work and its MUCH slower than my cable at home...

Ralph
08-14-04, 04:34 PM
Our cable is much faster as compared to when I had dial up. There is also a security scandal happening here where people who have dial up have fell victim to a long distance charge situation and people are stuck with $800 dollar phone bills! The phone company will only pay for half of the charges. Therefore I think that cable is more secure.

Randy_W
08-14-04, 10:56 PM
I live a half mile from the trunk and had DSL, until my son showed me his cable. I now have had cable for three + years. It's more than twice as fast as DSL! ;)

Playdrv4me
08-15-04, 10:28 AM
Cable No question...

Well that is until 37Mbps DSL shows up...

Stoneage_Caddy
08-15-04, 12:26 PM
Brett , just want to let you know my dad works for verizon in data services ( dealing with the systsmes/network in the internal side)-

He tells me you are getting the new "fiber to the premise system". by the time it is done there will be a fiber line from your house to the temple terrace verizon complex where there will be a large satlletie field . Not only will you have great internet but a few other things will come with it (like hi def TV on every channel). He says it will be 20 times faster and "BLOW CABLE AWAY FOR GOOD". He also envys you very much being the first to get it (was very excited when i told him i found someone getting there yard dug up for it).

As for DSL vs Cable , dad tells me cable is like a big mulitlane interstate that everyone uses . At 2 o clock in the morning its gonne be wicked fast but at rush our it will take you forever . He says DSL is like your own one lane road with a strictly enforced speedlimit , you may not go as fast as the interstate at 2am but youll always go the same speed regardless of how many people in your area are online ...Or you can hold out for the afforementioned "fiber to the premise" ....

Verizon really wants to get the cable and internet buisness very very much and if what my dad says is ture there gonna be the industry leaders

Playdrv4me
08-17-04, 06:57 AM
Brett , just want to let you know my dad works for verizon in data services ( dealing with the systsmes/network in the internal side)-

He tells me you are getting the new "fiber to the premise system". by the time it is done there will be a fiber line from your house to the temple terrace verizon complex where there will be a large satlletie field . Not only will you have great internet but a few other things will come with it (like hi def TV on every channel). He says it will be 20 times faster and "BLOW CABLE AWAY FOR GOOD". He also envys you very much being the first to get it (was very excited when i told him i found someone getting there yard dug up for it).

As for DSL vs Cable , dad tells me cable is like a big mulitlane interstate that everyone uses . At 2 o clock in the morning its gonne be wicked fast but at rush our it will take you forever . He says DSL is like your own one lane road with a strictly enforced speedlimit , you may not go as fast as the interstate at 2am but youll always go the same speed regardless of how many people in your area are online ...Or you can hold out for the afforementioned "fiber to the premise" ....

Verizon really wants to get the cable and internet buisness very very much and if what my dad says is ture there gonna be the industry leaders

This is exactly what I was talking about... and quite frankly I think its going to take a MONUMENTAL achievement in terms of speed and available packaging to get Cable customers to move over (though I lived in Tampa for a while and Verizon did have very attractive packages then, its one of the few non-SBC controlled markets ive lived in).

I would like to think that I have been messing with high speed standards since their infancy on the consumer side at least, so I have a fair shake at making educated observations.

Way back 97/98-ish when I was living out of the country in Guatemala City, they were ALREADY introducing High-speed cable there, most likely because the immense cost of using the internet by Dial-Up made the 60-70.00 a month cost justifiable (you are charged for every minute on the line regardless of whether its a local or long distance call, this made for some very interesting phone bills for a certain 15 year old's dad.)

Anyhow, outside of the problems that go with any new technology in what is still mostly a 3rd world country (people would dig up the fiber and steal it), this thing seemed like it was held together with duct tape and bailing wire (and the modem was HUGE!). Sometimes wed have outages that would last for a week, sometimes wed have long periods of uptime, but I can honestly say, even since those days I NEVER had a significantly slow period on ANY cable system Ive ever been on. This is despite the classic anti-cable stance that you are sharing a network with other users, and from a security standpoint, I agree with Wes on that one.

In contrast, when I RETURNED from Guatemala to the states in 99', I decided to give DSL a try, and that is as far as im concerned the LAST time I will ever use DSL. From the beginning I had to be concerned with being on a "fringe area" in the MIDDLE of a major city, and I ALMOST got charged 1000.00 for a piece of equipment that my apartment complex was going to need to be able to use the service (Luckily I had an awesome tech who basically installed this for free when he showed up)! When they finally installed my equipment, after weeks of waiting for it (and a 1 year contract), to my amazement the DSL was actually AVAILABLE LESS than the Cable connection I had in Guatemala! On top of this, there were many times the connection was so SLOW as to almost be unusable, despite the fact that I wasnt sharing this connection with anyone. Then finally, one day the whole shabang went south. I lost not only my DSL connection, but my PHONE too! Luckily there just happened to be an SBC technician outside working on something else, and he was kind enough to troubleshoot my connection for me. He fixed who knows what, and I was back online that day.

Then it happened AGAIN two months later, but this time, after 5 days of having no phone, they were finally able to get me a phone line again (with lots of static no-less) but heres the kicker, they were NEVER able to triangulate a usable DSL signal for me ever again, it somehow just "disappeared" and that was it. After two or three techs showed up to look at my connection, I ended up keeping a bunch of DSL equipment for free, and being exhonerated from a 1 year contract less than 4 months into it. That was the last straw for DSL.

Since then, both have improved substantially, but DSL still has its quirks, like having to use oddly bound PPPoE adapters with non-static IP's, signing contracts with some or most providers, and the fact that ALOT of areas still are NOT properly zoned for the thing, so what happened to me is still a possibility. Cable providers that forced you to buy your own equipment were really the only major headache Ive ever had, and now even that seems to be going away as Time warner and COX both provide modems, or incentives to get them for free or next to nothing.

This is the reason that DSL is now going to have to jump through some MAJOR hoops, like COMPLETE infrastructure OVERHAULS to steal cable customers back, and with cable customers getting enticed into more and more multimedia, like phone service, it will be more and more difficult to get them back, so NOW is when DSL providers will have to act. Im not saying the new DSL technologies wont absolutely kick the ass of what cable currently offers, but thats pretty much what its gonna take to get the business. Not to mention the untapped millions that still have 10-25.00 dial-up connections.

JohnnyO
08-20-04, 02:37 PM
:coolgleam We've had both at home and like the Verizon DSL better. Our cable company was Adelphia also, they're operating out of bankruptcy and suck in a lot of ways. We went dish in the spring for the TV's.