: Crazy, random question. What's New Jersey like?



I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-04-07, 09:44 PM
I've always been curious. I've heard a lot of good and a lot of bad things about Jersey. What's it really like? I know we've got a few prominent members from there.

Jesda
12-04-07, 09:49 PM
The areas related to NYC metro are hideous. The rest of the state is absolutely gorgeous. Its like that scene from The Sound of Music. The hills are alive!

dkozloski
12-04-07, 10:02 PM
Don't you watch the Sopranos? It's all gangsters and corrupt dockworkers unuions.

Submariner409
12-04-07, 10:20 PM
Most of New Jersey is a terribly corrupt dying union state trying to find an identity which belongs in the 1880's.

As Bob Dylan wrote: "Anything's legal in Jersey, as long as you don't get caught!"

(Close second to Maryland....)

Playdrv4me
12-04-07, 10:31 PM
There's a commercial on the radio frequently these days for a cough remedy called "Buckley's Cough Mixture". Their "gimmick" is that the stuff tastes absolutely HORRIBLE but does actually get rid of your cough.

In one of their commercials you overhear a person dialing their automated phone attendant, which begins to list out the reasons you might be calling and the corresponding button push. One of the button pushes corresponds to all the hideous things Buckley's Cough Mixture tastes like (ex. State fair porta-potty, A Monkey's sweaty back, Trash-bag leakage etc etc). The last one she mentions in that list is "New Jersey".

77CDV
12-04-07, 11:03 PM
Like any state, New Jersey has it's good and bad parts. I have family down in Cape May, and that seems like a fairly nice spot, unless it's hurricane season, then I suppose it really sucks. What I can't stand about Jersey (and the east coast in general) is the insane humidity during the summer. I remember visiting about 10 years ago and the combo of heat and humidity literally made me want to hurl. And it was only like 85 or 90 degrees, which is nothing here in SoCal, but there was like 80% humidity. Yuk!

On the other hand, I knew a kid in high school who was from Jersey and he couldn't wait to go back.

So, what's sparked your curiousity?

Craig

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-04-07, 11:43 PM
So, what's sparked your curiousity?


The boss and his undying love for his native state. As a few of you know, I'm a HUGE Springsteen fan, so I've got most of his CD's. A lot of his songs either take place in Jersey, or mention Jersey in them. A few that come to mind are:

-Open All Night
"Early north Jersey industrial skyline
I'm a all-set cobra jet creepin' through the nighttime
Gotta find a gas station, gotta find a payphone
This turnpike sure is spooky at night when you're all alone
Gotta hit the gas, baby. I'm running late,
This New Jersey in the mornin' like a lunar landscape"........


....."Your eyes get itchy in the wee wee hours
Sun's just a red ball risin' over them refinery towers
Radio's jammed up with gospel stations
Lost souls callin' long distance salvation
Hey, mister deejay, won'tcha hear my last prayer
Hey, ho, rock'n'roll, deliver me from nowhere"


-State Trooper
"New Jersey Turnpike, ridin' on a wet night `neath the refin'ry's glow
Out where the great black rivers flow
License, registration: I ain't got none
But I got a clear conscience `bout the things that I done"


With both of these songs, he makes it seem as though Jersey is an industrial wasteland...all sorts of refineries, and factorys and stuff like that..."dirty businesses" if you will.

-Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)
And my tires were slashed and I almost crashed, but the Lord had mercy
And my machine, she's a dud, out stuck in the mud
Somewhere in the swamps of Jersey........."


In this (most excellent) one, he makes it seem as Jersey is like Northern Florida...swampy, more agricultural, etc etc. Much different from the picture he's painting in his later songs.

I guess after I really started getting into Springsteen a few years back, I've always had an interest in New Jersey. It seems like it's a big blend of culture, landscape, economy, climate and culture. Seems like it would be an interesting place to go and spend some time...

gdwriter
12-05-07, 12:12 AM
Like any state, New Jersey has it's good and bad parts. I have family down in Cape May, and that seems like a fairly nice spot, unless it's hurricane season, then I suppose it really sucks. What I can't stand about Jersey (and the east coast in general) is the insane humidity during the summer. I remember visiting about 10 years ago and the combo of heat and humidity literally made me want to hurl. And it was only like 85 or 90 degrees, which is nothing here in SoCal, but there was like 80% humidity. Yuk!I'll second that. One reason I could never live anywhere in the East, Midwest or South is the godawful humidity in the summer. And even after living in Phoenix for 15 years, 110 with 10% humidity doesn't feel as unbearable as 90 with 80% humidity.

Fortunately, it's rarely humid in Western Oregon. The Pacific breeze keeps it really nice here (most of the time) in the summer.

lawfive
12-05-07, 12:26 AM
What Jesda said. Most of Jersey is just awesomely beautiful. The parts that are bad, though, are horribly bad.

dkozloski
12-05-07, 12:28 AM
The trouble with low humidity is that all your furniture falls apart when the wood shrinks. The wintertime indoor humidity around here is about 20%. You walk across the carpet and get nailed by the light switch then you sit on a chair that goes to the floor.

caddycruiser
12-05-07, 12:28 AM
Haha! You know...even living in PA and then Delaware for my 21 years on the planet, I actually had never been to Jersey aside from the quick Turnpike jaunt to NYC.

A few weeks ago I went with my mother--on a car shopping expedition--essentially from Philly due east to the Jersey coast. Really seemed quite nice, aside from some terrible roads early on (I think Cherry Hill area, at slower speeds through town). Then once we got out of town, just typical rural/spaced out town looking, with nice scenery...and...round-abouts. That was a little odd at first, including the "Circle" signs beforehand, but were kind of cool after the first few.

I STILL think the illegal to pump your own gas thing is bizarre, but then again full service is a great thing for a lot of people...and it is still cheaper, due to their lower gas tax. Always funny, though, to meet someone at home or here at school from Jersey...who's completely in the dark about how one actually DOES put gas in their car. Talk about blank stares at the pump:)

Overall...like any other state, with its own oddities. Good areas and bad. Rural, towns, and cities. Throw in round-abouts instead of typical larger intersections...and full service gas per law...and you have New Jersey.

gdwriter
12-05-07, 12:31 AM
I STILL think the illegal to pump your own gas thing is bizarre, but then again full service is a great thing for a lot of people...and it is still cheaper, due to their lower gas tax. Always funny, though, to meet someone at home or here at school from Jersey...who's completely in the dark about how one actually DOES put gas in their car. Talk about blank stares at the pump:)Neither Oregon nor New Jersey allow self-serve gas. I had owned Cruella for nearly two years before I actually filled her tank myself, on the road trip to Des Moines.

AMGoff
12-05-07, 12:35 AM
Jesda summed it up pretty well...

Frankly, there is no such thing as "New Jersey," there's North Jersey and there's South Jersey (although there's some who insist there's such a thing as Central Jersey, but that's nothing more than a myth..). The sad thing is, when most people think of New Jersey (especially those who've never seen the entire state), they think of North Jersey... and that's not a good thing (Sorry, Sandy). I don't associate with that part of the state, hence my location is listed as "South Jersey," it is for all intents and purposes, an entirely different state... in fact, there have been a number of times in the state's history when referendums have been brought forth to actually split the state in two.

South Jersey is beautiful and vast tracks of it remain untouched. It's an area steeped in history - much of which goes back to colonial times. Despite what people may think, most South Jerseans have more southern inclinations, than northern inclinations - if extended to the coast, half of South Jersey would actually lie below the Mason-Dixon line.

There are three predominate features here - the shore areas, the Pine-barrens, and the agricultural areas. The shore area offers a full range of experiences, from the history of Cape May, to the cozy hideaways like Stone Harbor, to the family friendly destinations of Ocean City and the Wildwoods, to the glitz of Atlantic City - the last three being well known for their boardwalks. Just as a point of clarification - it's not the beach - it's the shore.

The Pine-Barrens is 1.1 million acres of sandy, heavily forested, primarily untouched land. It was the country's first established National Preserve and development in the area is strictly regulated and largely prohibited. The sandy consistency of the soil helps to filter and recharge the Cohansey aquifer - 17 trillion gallons of what is considered to be the purest water in the United States. It was one of the earliest major industrial areas during the Revolution - the area's naturally occurring bog-iron was gathered to create cannonballs which were summarily lobbed at the British up through the War of 1812. The modern, domesticated blueberry and cranberry were cultivated in the Pine-Barrens, and the region is the nation's second and third largest producer of blueberries and cranberries, respectively.

I was born, raised, and still live in Salem County - which is one of the cornerstone counties that comprise South Jersey's rural/agricultural area. With approx. 67,000 people, we are the least populated and the least densely populated county in the entire state (in contrast, the most populated - Bergen County in North Jersey, has a pop. close to 900,000)... to further put things in perspective, latest estimates put the county's livestock population at about 100,000. Salem County covers 338 square miles, of which 167 square miles (49%) is actively farmed and another 53 sq. miles (16%) consists of meadow and marshlands, tidal and freshwater wetlands, bay beaches and dunes, and vast tracks of forest. We lie in the southwest corner of the state, nestle along the Delaware Bay... the landscape is dominated by rolling hills and is dotted with quaint little towns (Boroughs) that are surrounded by townships largely comprised by farms. It is an absolutely gorgeous area, and it's only further highlighted by it's varied features.

The county is rich in history... it is the oldest county in the state, having been created in 1694. Our county courthouse is the second oldest in the nation in continuous use, built in 1735 during the reign of George II. My hometown was originally founded in 1726 and the town founder's house still stands since 1728. There were two battles fought here during the Revolution - Hancocks Bridge and Quintons Bridge, General "Mad" Anthony Wayne crossed the Delaware into Salem County in search of livestock to feed the Continental Army at Valley Forge, and the Salem Courthouse was the site of the infamous "Treason Trials," which convicted several loyalists who helped the British during the war. It was in 1820, when a local army colonel publicly ate a tomato - dispelling the previously held myth that tomatoes were poisonous making Salem County the "birthplace" of the Jersey Tomato. Fort Mott, became a heavy Union fortification designed to protect the Delaware River and Finns Point National Cemetery was established to bury Confederate POWs who died at Fort Delaware. And to just further the "southerness" of the area - my town, well the surrounding township actually (it's a shared school district, so it's considered the same) is home to Cowtown - the oldest continuously operating rodeo in the United States - yes, in NJ.

So when people make jokes about NJ, I only shrug them off... because I realize that they've never been to my part of the state and are summarily talking out of their ass. There is nothing like South Jersey and I feel I am blessed to have been born in and continue to live here. There is no other place where you can be so far out "in the country," while still only being 50 minutes from Philly and 2-2.5 hours from NYC, DC, and Baltimore... it really is the best of both worlds, and I wouldn't have it any other way.

Oh... all that and I don't have to pump my own (relatively cheap) gas.

Night Wolf
12-05-07, 06:29 AM
Worst drivers ever.

urbanski
12-05-07, 06:39 AM
it smells like a taint

slk230mb
12-05-07, 08:03 AM
My guess, since I know nothing about MN, is that New Jersey is nothing like MN.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-05-07, 09:55 AM
South Jersey sounds a bit like North Dakota.

malcolm
12-05-07, 10:28 AM
What exit

kbevere
12-05-07, 10:54 AM
I have to say i love Jersey and not because i lived here all my life so far. but its near NYC if i ever want to go. We have lots of beaches and who can not forget AC baby! It may not be the best place in the world but its my home. You have to live here to appreciate its bad and goods. I will never move out of Jersey. So for those of you who dont live here you have to come vist at lest once.:welcome:

AMGoff
12-05-07, 11:50 AM
Worst drivers ever.

That's subjective.. New Yorkers are by far the worst... by extension drivers from North Jersey through to CT/RI are horrid. Things are different down here.. relatively few highways, mostly back roads.. I personally avoid the highways at all cost.. I only have to deal with the idiots from DE and PA who terrorize the local roads when they're trying to find some shortcut - then they come to a circle and muck everything up! Helloooo... you don't stop when you're in a circle people!

With that said.. My Dad has a house down in Georgia, so I've been behind quite a few Georgia bumble-fs in my time.. they're not the "peachiest" drivers in the world either.

Anyhoo... We're getting our first snow of the season... SO pretty.

Spyder
12-05-07, 12:10 PM
Frankly, there is no such thing as "New Jersey," there's North Jersey and there's South Jersey (although there's some who insist there's such a thing as Central Jersey, but that's nothing more than a myth..). The sad thing is, when most people think of New Jersey (especially those who've never seen the entire state), they think of North Jersey... and that's not a good thing (Sorry, Sandy). I don't associate with that part of the state, hence my location is listed as "South Jersey," it is for all intents and purposes, an entirely different state... in fact, there have been a number of times in the state's history when referendums have been brought forth to actually split the state in two.

Ha, sounds a lot like California, actually...between the north and the south, but with San Fran being its own crazy mixed up backwards ass country. There's been many times that California has tried to split too...and the differences between up here where I'm at and down in the southern part where everyone thinks all of California is are amazingly vast.

AMGoff
12-05-07, 12:32 PM
Ha, sounds a lot like California, actually...between the north and the south, but with San Fran being its own crazy mixed up backwards ass country. There's been many times that California has tried to split too...and the differences between up here where I'm at and down in the southern part where everyone thinks all of California is are amazingly vast.

It would make economic sense to do so here, and probably in CA as well. Despite being the bigger half of the state, we only comprise less than a quarter of the state's population... we get even less than that in terms of state spending. Trenton (and all of it's corruption) is controlled by North Jersey interests. I think it's absurd that we're just as "responsible" for the $30B in state debt as all of those north of Trenton who primarily caused it. Last year.. all but one of the seven southern counties (Camden was the one... go figure) had balanced budgets and it's been that way for years. Unlike the rest of the state, we are a generally conservative area and we have a general disdain for liberal spending policies. Everyone in South Jersey would be much better off if we were made independent from the enormous burden that is North Jersey. Our interests simply aren't a concern in Trenton and it sucks... if North Jersey wants to spend itself into oblivion and economic ruin then that's all well and good... but leave us the hell out of it!

It's probably been a good 20 years since the last time splitting the state was brought up... I think it's well past due to be brought up again.

dkozloski
12-05-07, 12:45 PM
It would make economic sense to do so here, and probably in CA as well. Despite being the bigger half of the state, we only comprise less than a quarter of the state's population... we get even less than that in terms of state spending. Trenton (and all of it's corruption) is controlled by North Jersey interests. I think it's absurd that we're just as "responsible" for the $30B in state debt as all of those north of Trenton who primarily caused it. Last year.. all but one of the seven southern counties (Camden was the one... go figure) had balanced budgets and it's been that way for years. Unlike the rest of the state, we are a generally conservative area and we have a general disdain for liberal spending policies. Everyone in South Jersey would be much better off if we were made independent from the enormous burden that is North Jersey. Our interests simply aren't a concern in Trenton and it sucks... if North Jersey wants to spend itself into oblivion and economic ruin then that's all well and good... but leave us the hell out of it!

It's probably been a good 20 years since the last time splitting the state was brought up... I think it's well past due to be brought up again.
This is exactly how the western and central states regard the east. The U.S. needs to be cut in half at the Mississippi so the eastern half can float away.

malcolm
12-05-07, 01:57 PM
Some of the best surfing on the east coast, believe it or not.

dkozloski
12-05-07, 03:12 PM
The Lituya Bay event in Alaska on July 9, 1958 generated a wave 1720 feet high. One of the fishing boats in the bay rode the wave over a hill more that 100 feet high and were carried 25 miles out to sea. That was a wave.

caddycruiser
12-05-07, 03:45 PM
I have a question for you Jersey guys I just thought of...

We trekked across the state, from Cherry Hill (about) to Manahawkin, it was essentially all 2 lanes, most of which were nothing but tree lined.

What was weird to me was, as it happened twice, whenever we'd pass someone moving too slow on these empty roads all as usual (signal and floor it)...the person we were passing would move to the right and essentially largely ride the berm, then get back in the lane once we were passed.

Is this some kind of a Jersey law or driver thing to do when you're passed...or were we just seeing things with two odd drivers? I've never seen anyone do that before, wherever I've been.

Dadillac
12-05-07, 04:21 PM
I have a question for you Jersey guys I just thought of...

We trekked across the state, from Cherry Hill (about) to Manahawkin, it was essentially all 2 lanes, most of which were nothing but tree lined.

What was weird to me was, as it happened twice, whenever we'd pass someone moving too slow on these empty roads all as usual (signal and floor it)...the person we were passing would move to the right and essentially largely ride the berm, then get back in the lane once we were passed.

Is this some kind of a Jersey law or driver thing to do when you're passed...or were we just seeing things with two odd drivers? I've never seen anyone do that before, wherever I've been.
You came across two odd drivers. Mostly in NJ it is customary for those slow drivers to speed up once you try and pass them. Or they will tailgate you once you pass, at a higher rate of speed than they were driving before. It seems that most, not all, NJ drivers have a feeling that they must protect the space that they occupy. It is stupid and very dangerous on the highway. I driverd come across this all day long. The kicker is when you pass a slower driver, they then speed up and pass you and get in front again, and then they slow down. A&%$oles.

Don

Night Wolf
12-05-07, 04:43 PM
That's subjective.. New Yorkers are by far the worst... by extension drivers from North Jersey through to CT/RI are horrid. Things are different down here.. relatively few highways, mostly back roads.. I personally avoid the highways at all cost.. I only have to deal with the idiots from DE and PA who terrorize the local roads when they're trying to find some shortcut - then they come to a circle and muck everything up! Helloooo... you don't stop when you're in a circle people!

With that said.. My Dad has a house down in Georgia, so I've been behind quite a few Georgia bumble-fs in my time.. they're not the "peachiest" drivers in the world either.

Anyhoo... We're getting our first snow of the season... SO pretty.

Drivers here in GA aren't too bad, Atlanta is worse then here tho.... but, I'm not from here.

I'm a New Yorker.... and... I don't think NY drivers are the worst, when you get to the city, there is alot of horns, fingers and fists out the window, and the occasional cut-off.... but I've driven thru Noo Joysee plenty of times... the Palisades Parkway is the worst, I remember just watching the idiot things people were doing, one after another, just a whole group of NJ drivers using the shoulder as a spare lane, the u-turns whenever they felt across medians/curbs..... it was horrible.

Tampa Bay holds a very tight 2nd place, but still NJ will have to take the cake on that one.

Night Wolf
12-05-07, 04:45 PM
You came across two odd drivers. Mostly in NJ it is customary for those slow drivers to speed up once you try and pass them. Or they will tailgate you once you pass, at a higher rate of speed than they were driving before. It seems that most, not all, NJ drivers have a feeling that they must protect the space that they occupy. It is stupid and very dangerous on the highway. I driverd come across this all day long. The kicker is when you pass a slower driver, they then speed up and pass you and get in front again, and then they slow down. A&%$oles.

Don

The worst part is..... this is true!

dkozloski
12-05-07, 04:59 PM
You came across two odd drivers. Mostly in NJ it is customary for those slow drivers to speed up once you try and pass them. Or they will tailgate you once you pass, at a higher rate of speed than they were driving before. It seems that most, not all, NJ drivers have a feeling that they must protect the space that they occupy. It is stupid and very dangerous on the highway. I driverd come across this all day long. The kicker is when you pass a slower driver, they then speed up and pass you and get in front again, and then they slow down. A&%$oles.

Don
That accurately describes Canadians as well.

dkozloski
12-05-07, 05:02 PM
Germans are terminally insane. On a two lane road they all fan out four wide like the back stretch at Taladega. If a car comes the other way they merge together, then as soon as they pass they all fan out again, all in those little sh!tbox cars.

AMGoff
12-05-07, 05:06 PM
I have a question for you Jersey guys I just thought of...

We trekked across the state, from Cherry Hill (about) to Manahawkin, it was essentially all 2 lanes, most of which were nothing but tree lined.

What was weird to me was, as it happened twice, whenever we'd pass someone moving too slow on these empty roads all as usual (signal and floor it)...the person we were passing would move to the right and essentially largely ride the berm, then get back in the lane once we were passed.

Is this some kind of a Jersey law or driver thing to do when you're passed...or were we just seeing things with two odd drivers? I've never seen anyone do that before, wherever I've been.


You came across two odd drivers. Mostly in NJ it is customary for those slow drivers to speed up once you try and pass them. Or they will tailgate you once you pass, at a higher rate of speed than they were driving before. It seems that most, not all, NJ drivers have a feeling that they must protect the space that they occupy. It is stupid and very dangerous on the highway. I driverd come across this all day long. The kicker is when you pass a slower driver, they then speed up and pass you and get in front again, and then they slow down. A&%$oles.

Don

Again... that just highlights the difference between two totally different cultures, it doesn't surprise me for one second that such behavior would be considered "odd" by my brethren to the north. Down here however, such actions certainly aren't out of the norm... especially if on a "super-two," (ie - one with a hard shoulder). No it's not a law, just a courtesy. I've always found that the closer you get to NYC, everyone seems like they're constantly in a hurry to get somewhere and by extension - the idea of letting someone in front of them is borderline blasphemous. Sure, there are some *******s down here who will try to play games on the road but for the most part, people generally have a more laid back attitude, and that can translate into driving habits - there isn't this overwhelming need to have to get somewhere asap. If someone wants to pass it's much easier to just let them pass than to have them riding your ass. Especially on windy, wooded roads where you can't always see what's coming down the road (deer, oncoming traffic, etc..) it's not all that uncommon for someone to slow down and pull off slightly in order to give someone room to pass.

So no, it's not odd... it's just common courtesy 'round these parts.

dkozloski
12-05-07, 05:45 PM
Again... that just highlights the difference between two totally different cultures, it doesn't surprise me for one second that such behavior would be considered "odd" by my brethren to the north. Down here however, such actions certainly aren't out of the norm... especially if on a "super-two," (ie - one with a hard shoulder). No it's not a law, just a courtesy. I've always found that the closer you get to NYC, everyone seems like they're constantly in a hurry to get somewhere and by extension - the idea of letting someone in front of them is borderline blasphemous. Sure, there are some *******s down here who will try to play games on the road but for the most part, people generally have a more laid back attitude, and that can translate into driving habits - there isn't this overwhelming need to have to get somewhere asap. If someone wants to pass it's much easier to just let them pass than to have them riding your ass. Especially on windy, wooded roads where you can't always see what's coming down the road (deer, oncoming traffic, etc..) it's not all that uncommon for someone to slow down and pull off slightly in order to give someone room to pass.

So no, it's not odd... it's just common courtesy 'round these parts.
When I was a kid, the highways around here were barely wide enough for one car. There were turnouts at strategic locations so if you met a car coming the other way somebody could pull off to make room to pass. At lunch time you stopped and built a fire in the middle of the road. If somebody else came along you shared your lunch. To this day the law reads that if you have five cars backed up behind you on a two lane road you must pull over and let them by. It's very common to pull over and let someone have the road.

HITMONEY
12-05-07, 05:50 PM
Jersey has some incredible untapped business opportunites...

I was thinking of opening a Hazmat bathing suite boutique at the Jersey shore...

And the market for designer portable breathable air supply's in Newark is off the charts!!







(I am allowed to say these things because I was born there)

Playdrv4me
12-05-07, 06:58 PM
The only driving experience I have in "Joysee" is the turnpike through the state... But I can tell you that if you are not going at least 20mph above the speed limit on that thing, you will die. Im used to it now from driving on it so many times coming out of NYC, and also because 50 percent of the Tampa population is Northeast transplants (or it seems that way), but for someone not used to it, it can be pretty scary. It is nice and wide though.

I think Jesda almost ate Freightliner a couple of times lol.

gdwriter
12-05-07, 07:15 PM
Considering all the comments about New Jersey drivers, it's no wonder Sandy rarely drives his Sixty Special.

eldorado99
12-05-07, 10:17 PM
That accurately describes Canadians as well.


All Americans generalize. :stirpot:

dkozloski
12-05-07, 10:28 PM
All Americans generalize. :stirpot:
All generalizations are false including this one.

eldorado99
12-05-07, 10:49 PM
All generalizations are false including this one.

Apology accepted. ;)

blunted
12-06-07, 01:41 PM
Worst drivers ever.

Amen...

This past summer my boss invited me out to Long Beach Island which was pretty nice.. you drive across this long ass bridge which takes you to the island that looks like the ocean could just swallow one day. Most of the hotels are about 10ft from the sand.. I almost forgot I was in Jersey while I was there.

AMGoff
12-06-07, 01:54 PM
The only driving experience I have in "Joysee" is the turnpike through the state... But I can tell you that if you are not going at least 20mph above the speed limit on that thing, you will die. Im used to it now from driving on it so many times coming out of NYC, and also because 50 percent of the Tampa population is Northeast transplants (or it seems that way), but for someone not used to it, it can be pretty scary. It is nice and wide though.

I think Jesda almost ate Freightliner a couple of times lol.

Ain't that the truth... like I said before, I'll avoid the highways at any cost, especially the Turnpike. It's not so bad from exits 1-4 because it's only two lanes and it's mostly locals trying to bypass 295... after exit 4 though it widens to three lanes and then by exits 5 and 6 I-95 and the PA Turnpike dump into it, after that watch the f out - it's insane. The real fun though starts at exit 8 where it expands to five lanes in each direction, where the far left two lanes split off for trucks and buses... I don't even understand the point of having a speed limit because you can easily cruise 85-95mph and nobody will give you a second look. It was actually on that stretch (back in my reckless youth days) that I hit my fastest speed ever - 143mph in my brother's RX-7... I know lots of people have gone much faster, but talk about a heart-pumping experience! I remember I wanted to try and hit 150, but I pussed out!

But yeah, it's absurd up there... it's not the most horrible road in the state though - the distinction goes to the Garden State Parkway north of Woodbridge... I'd rather let some dirty hobo perform a cavity search on me than ever drive on that damned road.

Playdrv4me
12-06-07, 01:57 PM
I'd rather let some dirty hobo perform a cavity search on me than ever drive on that damned road.

LOL!!!!

I~LUV~Caddys8792
12-06-07, 02:14 PM
I'd rather let some dirty hobo perform a cavity search on me than ever drive on that damned road.

I'll call Jesda, I think we could arrange that.

Dadillac
12-06-07, 09:00 PM
Ain't that the truth... like I said before, I'll avoid the highways at any cost, especially the Turnpike. It's not so bad from exits 1-4 because it's only two lanes and it's mostly locals trying to bypass 295... after exit 4 though it widens to three lanes and then by exits 5 and 6 I-95 and the PA Turnpike dump into it, after that watch the f out - it's insane. The real fun though starts at exit 8 where it expands to five lanes in each direction, where the far left two lanes split off for trucks and buses... I don't even understand the point of having a speed limit because you can easily cruise 85-95mph and nobody will give you a second look. It was actually on that stretch (back in my reckless youth days) that I hit my fastest speed ever - 143mph in my brother's RX-7... I know lots of people have gone much faster, but talk about a heart-pumping experience! I remember I wanted to try and hit 150, but I pussed out!

But yeah, it's absurd up there... it's not the most horrible road in the state though - the distinction goes to the Garden State Parkway north of Woodbridge... I'd rather let some dirty hobo perform a cavity search on me than ever drive on that damned road.

Funny thing is that right there at "the split", it is the slowest part of the Turnpike. You have three lanes becoming 5 lanes. And it seems that noone knows where to go. It is very common to have a 75 mph flow slow down to 45 or 50 mph right there. Lots of rearendings happen there. And the GSP north of Woodbridge, it is horrible. My wife drives it everyday as we live in Woodbridge, and she works in Paterson. She is never happy when she arrives home.

Don

AMGoff
12-06-07, 10:32 PM
Funny thing is that right there at "the split", it is the slowest part of the Turnpike. You have three lanes becoming 5 lanes. And it seems that noone knows where to go. It is very common to have a 75 mph flow slow down to 45 or 50 mph right there. Lots of rearendings happen there. And the GSP north of Woodbridge, it is horrible. My wife drives it everyday as we live in Woodbridge, and she works in Paterson. She is never happy when she arrives home.

Don

Really? Although it's rare that I ever drive to that part of the state (usually only an occasional meeting in Montclair or when we go to NYC), I never see any backups going north... going south is a different story all together - dealing with five lanes of idiots squeezing into three isn't fun AT ALL. And for whatever reason, it always gets backed up around 7-7A... I guess it's a combination of Six Flags and Trenton/Princeton traffic, but that would only make sense in the summertime.

sikohsix
12-07-07, 01:17 AM
hardcore NYC CaddyMack right here. One thing I'll say about Jersey though, if you wanna go for WOT, then the jersey turnpike is the place to be.:lildevil:

Dadillac
12-07-07, 09:00 AM
hardcore NYC CaddyMack right here. One thing I'll say about Jersey though, if you wanna go for WOT, then the jersey turnpike is the place to be.:lildevil:

I call it the New Jersey International Speedway. I used to be a 85-100 mph driver on the NJTP. I have since slowed way down due to an incident, that the cop just gave me a lecture. I took it as a major wakeup call, and have since been a good boy on the highway. I now drive the turnpike at 65-70 mph, and feel like I am in the way, no matter what lane I am in.

Don

Dadillac
12-07-07, 09:03 AM
Really? Although it's rare that I ever drive to that part of the state (usually only an occasional meeting in Montclair or when we go to NYC), I never see any backups going north... going south is a different story all together - dealing with five lanes of idiots squeezing into three isn't fun AT ALL. And for whatever reason, it always gets backed up around 7-7A... I guess it's a combination of Six Flags and Trenton/Princeton traffic, but that would only make sense in the summertime.

Going north, between about 4pm and 6pm is the busiest time. Plus, this time of year, isn't so crazy. When summer hits, and you get to the "split" at that time, it is a nightmare. This coming June or July, try and experience it for yourself. You will be verbally speaking to yourself, asking why 3 lanes going into 5, can cause a major slowdown. It should be the fastest part of the ride.

Don