: Using Water to Dry Your Car



c5 rv
04-25-04, 07:34 AM
The Detailing Dude at http://www.thedetailingbible.com suggests using water to dry your car after washing. Basically, after washing the car, remove the sprayer from the end of the hose and use the flowing water to form puddles that sheet off the car and don't leave small drops behind. You then use a towel to blot the remaining water.

I tried it on both cars yesterday with mixed results. The CTS was recently clayed and Zainoed and the technique worked great. The drops that were left behind were larger than normal which minimized evaporization (and spotting) until I went over them with a towel. I haven't clayed and Zainoed the vette since October and a lot more water stuck to the car. As he suggests in his video clip, canned air or a leaf blower is still needed to get the water out from some places like behind the rear bezel of the CTS.

hcvone
04-25-04, 08:17 AM
I have used a leaf blower for about 5 years, some of this guys tips are good, he detailed cars on the side so I will tell you there are better people to get opinions from. ;)

Elvis
04-25-04, 09:00 AM
The water idea is great if you always have a fresh coat of wax on your car and only hand-wash it. Sadly, as your car gets older and you can't seem to find the time to wax it every 2-3 weeks, "drying with water" just doesn't work. That's when I discovered the remarkable Toro leaf blower.

elwesso
04-25-04, 10:40 AM
I really need to clay bar. My wax doesnt stick real good for more than 2 washes! :(

Robert Brandtjen
04-25-04, 07:27 PM
The Detailing Dude at http://www.thedetailingbible.com suggests using water to dry your car after washing. Basically, after washing the car, remove the sprayer from the end of the hose and use the flowing water to form puddles that sheet off the car and don't leave small drops behind. You then use a towel to blot the remaining water.
UUUGGGHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Don't do that! Spend some money on a genuine Chamois cloth- they have been used by those in the know for a 100 years on cars and by fine furniture makers for 500 years. Ever watch a movie and seen the chauffer wiping down the master's limo while he waits? He is using a chamois cloth.

Once every 4 years, buff the car out with 3M Imperial Microfinishing glaze.
Every Spring and every Fall Wax the car with a highend wax- should be a two step process.
Wash it once a week and dry it with a genuine Chamois cloth- it will look like new 20 years later.

Old Man Kincaid (this is how he was known), owner of National Lawn Mower, drove a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado to work (green) every day- Winter, Spring, Fall and Summer for 32 years. It looked gorgeous and I really wanted it. Here in Miinesota, it snows as much as 18 inches at a crack and routinely drops to 25 or more below zero (F). They also use salt on the roads. One day in 1993 his son took it away from him- Old Man Kincaid died 6 months later- he loved his car and he loved driving it- he was 94 years old. His daughter in law got the car and destroyed it within a year after his death.

But for 32 years it looked beautiful. And for 32 years O.M.K.'s "man" washed that car once a week and wiped it down with a Chamois cloth- twice a year he rubbed in a good paste wax.

Robert Brandtjen
04-25-04, 10:45 PM
P.S.

Buy a car you can love and, like a good woman, treat her well, with lots of love- doesn't mean you can't drive her hard, just make sure you give her a good rub down once in awhile and shine her up.

http://cadillacforums.com/forums/images/smilies/smile.gif

EmersonP123
04-28-04, 10:05 PM
Mr. Clean Autodry uses the same idea. Uses filtered water to dry the car. Works really good as long as you use it right. No waterspots.

hcvone
04-29-04, 07:42 AM
I was at a Mr. Clean demo for their new product several months ago, at the demo they (the company reps) could not get the cars dry without waterspotting. :helpless: :helpless:

exceldetail
04-30-04, 07:34 PM
That drying method is also know as the sheeting method. It works excellent, if done properly. I would not recommend a chamois for drying however, they do not have the ability to hide particles as would a waffle weave, which is a thicker product. There are better products available to those who care to ask ! Waffle Weave drying towels are the best items available to those detailing enthusiasts who trully care about quality car care. Microfiber towels are also available for product removal i.e. sealants, waxes, polishes, qd's. As for the blower method, to each their own i guess. I use a compressor to blow water out of emblems, door handles, etc. My drying method would consist of the sheeting method to the whole car, open the rear deck and open the hood to allow the remainaing water to fall away, dry the roof and doors, then the trunk and hood. Todays products, and im talking Zaino also, in my experience and others with whom i share experiences with, will seldom last more than three months. Its recommended in the detailing industry to mini-detail twice yr (polish/seal, 2 step) and full details, twice a yr (Clay/clean/polish/swirl removal/seal, 5 step), so lets say in winter you do a full, spring a mini, summer a full, autumn a mini.....
I dont mean to stir things up being new in here, just sharing experience and knowledge......

Robert Brandtjen
05-02-04, 12:40 PM
That drying method is also know as the sheeting method. It works excellent, if done properly. I would not recommend a chamois for drying however, they do not have the ability to hide particles as would a waffle weave, which is a thicker product. There are better products available to those who care to ask !
What knowlege is that? Chamois has been and continues to be the product of choice, period. The fact that you're comparing it to normal cloth with "waffle weave" tells me you have never used one- they do cost more then a cloth towel, for obvious reasons. Chamois is tanned for the specific purpose in mind- buffing a high gloss painted surface- and has the added advantage of being soft enough to not scratch the finish. Further more, no matter how wet it gets, all you have to do is wring it out to continue drying. A wet chamois will remove water spots- your towel will not.

Chamois will last a life time, all it needs is occasional laundering.

Robert Brandtjen
05-02-04, 01:30 PM
More on Chamois:

Swarovski Makes the finest scopes and binoculars in the world- they recommend chamois for cleaning those lenses :http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=219915&is=REG


Chamois leather is not the same thing as a chamois shirt:
http://www.chamois.co.nz/faq/#Whyuse

The stuff you're referring to always advertises itself as "Soft, chamois-like cloth is nonabrasive and machine washable" - i.e., it's a poor man's substitute.

Lastly: http://www.rucompatible.com/triumph/maintaining.htm

Now I ask you, would you rather use a product recommended by the makers of fine lenses, wood products, jewlry and automobiles? Or a product they wouldn't let near them?

MEJIA
05-04-04, 08:05 PM
Have used the Mr. Clean Autodry product, and as hcvone said, I can't make it be totally spotless. Have anybody achieved spotless dry using only the Mr.Clean product? Maybe I should go back to the old and faithful leaf blower....

hcvone
05-04-04, 08:43 PM
Leaf blower :) :)

exceldetail
05-11-04, 11:58 AM
What knowlege is that? Chamois has been and continues to be the product of choice, period. The fact that you're comparing it to normal cloth with "waffle weave" tells me you have never used one- they do cost more then a cloth towel, for obvious reasons. Chamois is tanned for the specific purpose in mind- buffing a high gloss painted surface- and has the added advantage of being soft enough to not scratch the finish. Further more, no matter how wet it gets, all you have to do is wring it out to continue drying. A wet chamois will remove water spots- your towel will not.

Chamois will last a life time, all it needs is occasional laundering.
Robert, ive been detailing for over 20 yrs and run a successful online retail car care product business. Chamois are a thing of the past as is Kit wax my friend, theres a better mouse trap, and were talking about "using water to dry the car". Hence my prior post. All I stated was there is a specific drying "method" used by enthusiasts, and detailers along with a waffle weave drying towel, which is not a "normal cloth", is among my experience as well as piers, works the best, hands down. If you care to use a chamois for drying your ride, so be it. What do you dry with after a shower, a chamois? If a wet chamois has the ability to remove water spots, how does it do that without some sort of abrasive action? Water spots in my world are chemical etches in the clear coat, otherwise its really no spot at all. How do you remove the dirt particles from your chamois? Do you launder it ? Waffle weave towels are launderable, and actually get better with age. Tanning is used to remove impurities, and make the product pliable and usable. Its not meant to provide buffing properties, that would be an advantage of the normal tanning process. Care care has come a long way. THE MAIN ADVANTAGE, other than having the ability to absorb 7-8 times its own weight, is the waffle weaves ability to hide dirt/dust particles in its nap, which may scratch or mar your cars finish, in the process of drying. This is due to its nap, weave, and thickness. Last time i used a chamois 10 yrs ago, they were relatively no thicker than a lamb"skin"........Isnt there another product made from lambskin ? I wont go there.....

Subguy
05-11-04, 01:35 PM
I am sorry I am of the chamois school of thought.......I have used chamois since 1983 when I first started detailing.......I am not closed minded enough not to try new things, but the chamois is IMO the best way to dry a car.....Recently I found a product in a plastic tube that I thought I would try it is called The Absorber......so far I am impressed......you store the Absorber in the tube while it is still damp it is very convenient......leaves no water spots and is meant to be machine washed. Actually after I washed it MOST of the stains from fender wells came out. Check it out I have seen them range from $8.00-$12.00 much less than a chamois. So far a good experiment..........

exceldetail
05-11-04, 03:55 PM
Sub, spend $10.00 and TRY a waffle weave......Im just saying, with time comes technology, lets stay with it !

RBraczyk
05-11-04, 04:37 PM
Waffle weave works well, but not like a real leather chamois. The california water blade works well for side panels, and a good air dry after you chamois it off works real nice.

exceldetail
05-12-04, 12:25 AM
Detailcity.com and Autopia would eat you guys for lunch for using Chammois on a auto's surface !!

RBraczyk
05-12-04, 06:29 AM
Why? It works. personally i prefer driving it around.