: Books! Neeeeed books!!! Help!



Spyder
08-18-07, 05:42 AM
So, I'm on a reading kick again. I used to read A BUNCH when I was a kid...HUNDREDS of books a year. I had the record for the most books checked out from the local library per month for years running. Now, since i started college, I've dropped off. I've been itching to get back into it lately and have slowly been doing it, but every time I go to the damned Barnes and Noble I can't find what I want.

Lately it's been 20,000 leagues under the sea, ginger man by jp donleavy, white lines, which is a collection of pieces by famous writers on cocaine, a bunch of hunter thompson stuff, and I'm currently in The Wave, about a high school class nazism experiment in 1969. I just ordered Catch-22 and was looking at some Faulkner and Hemmingway, but couldn't decide. I tried to read Hocus Pocus by...damnitt...the author is skipping my brain. Well known, wrote a BUNCH of super popular stuff, he's a 'jr.'... but I just couldn't get into it. Under and Alone by William Queen was awesome. Cannonball, Brock Yates, great. I've got all three thompson biographies, the michael jordan biography, The Turner Diaries, The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Last Of The Really Great Whangdoodles.

Examples of what I've liked in the past...Steven King, I actually like a LOT of his stuff. The Dark Tower series was AMAZING. C.S. Friedmans Coldfire trilogy was was the best I've ever read. I read a lot of fantasy, little bit of sci-fi and a lot of Tom Clancy, Dale Brown, etc. type stuff.
..but I'm not limiting my new scope to anything at all.

Recommend title, author, genre, anything. Just tell me some examples and WHY and I'll see what I can do about getting it done.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-18-07, 12:13 PM
Gulatibooks.com Your one stop shop for all reading needs, whether it be cross word puzzles, romance novels, letters to Penthouse or pulp fiction novels.

wait4me6920
08-18-07, 12:31 PM
I too read a lot. I'm always part-way through a couple & listen to others on the pod when walking.

I'm currently bogged down in some early Faulkner - "As I Lay Dying", "Sanctuary", "Light in August" & "Pylon". Brilliant writer, but his early writing requires serious concentration.

I think you'd enjoy "The Kite Runner" & "A Thousand Splendid Suns" by Khaled Hosseini. Both are superb works.

"Fourth Uncle in the Mountain: a Memoir of a Barefoot Doctor in Vietnam" by Quang Van Nguyen & Marjorie Pivar is another I really enjoyed.

Check out Donald Harington as well - "With" & "Cockroaches of Stay More" are excellent. This guy is seriously overlooked - great storyteller.

Something light & thoroughly enjoyable - "The Yokota Officers Club" by Sarah Bird. I bought this on a whim because I am familiar with the O'Club at Yokota. The story takes place in Japan, circa late 50s or so, & is really a hoot anyone would enjoy.

I could go on for days, but these are a few you can look into.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-18-07, 01:15 PM
All kidding aside, I like Steven King's work. Last summer, I read The Stand, The Shining, IT (about the horrors of working for technical assistance!) and Christine. Even though The Stand took me two months to complete (got very dry in the middle, had to take a few long breaks), it was well worth it. IT was about the same size (900-1000 pages), but that took me all of three weeks to read...it's a very good read. IT is probably my favorite book of his.

I've read a few Rolling Stones/ Led Zeppelin biographys, those are always a good read.

That's all I can think of for now, I'll post if anything else pops into my head.

Spyder
08-18-07, 02:15 PM
I Luv Caddys...once you read a bunch more King, READ THE DARK TOWER. It is, simply put, AMAZING. He integrates bits and pieces from soooo many of his other books into it, and does it so well... If you havn't read any or enough of his other stuff, a LOT of the dark tower will be lost on you. Salem's Lot, Black House (or maybe its Dark House, or something house, with Peter Straub), hell, he even had bits and pieces from From A Buick 8, which came out AFTER some of the dark tower stuff. GOOD.

Spyder
08-18-07, 02:15 PM
wait4me..thank you! I'll be looking into all of those next time I get on half.com!!!

Rolex
08-18-07, 02:18 PM
I'm not a big recreational reader, but I read Black Light by Stephen Hunter a few months ago and it was a good book. It is set in the NW Arkansas area so I related to the book pretty well. I'm reading Max Brooks Complete Guide to Zombie Survival now. ;)

Spyder
08-18-07, 02:25 PM
Haha...did Dopestar send it to ya or did you get your own copy? And, didja notice what rifle is on the cover of it? :)

ewill3rd
08-18-07, 03:23 PM
I don't need more than my two hands to count how many books I have read in my life.
(from cover to cover)
Heck, I can barely make it through a magazine!
My dad read every book in his high school library, my sister tore through war and peace in like 2 days.
They are both reading nuts!

You could always go to the library and just start at one end and work your way accross?

ewill3rd
08-18-07, 03:25 PM
Wait... do service manuals count?! :D

Rolex
08-18-07, 04:21 PM
Haha...did Dopestar send it to ya or did you get your own copy? And, didja notice what rifle is on the cover of it? :)

Yup looks like the M1 to me. :D I bought a copy of the book off Amazon.

malcolm
08-18-07, 06:47 PM
If God wanted us to read He wouldn't have given us TV.

JimHare
08-19-07, 12:39 PM
Reading is FUNdamental.. or so I've heard.... I applaud your desire to read. Any reading is probably good, but remember that there are other types of books than fiction. The way I see it, there are three types of reading - FORCED ("there will be a test of chapters 5 through 7 of The Scarlett Letter next Thursday...",) ENJOYMENT, (most fiction, etc ) and EDUCATIONAL. Educational reading helps you understand the way things are - be it science, history, philosophy, and so on. At least the latter two are good, and perhaps the first type, if you can actually get anything out of it.

About 90% of what I read is non-fiction. I find history and science very helpful in realizing why things work the way they do, be it quantum mechanics, or Middle Eastern political strife. Once you realize that, for the most part, there's a REASON why things happen the way they do, you don't spend so much time wondering "what the hell is going on?"...

The Connections series by James Burke is very good for an interesting twist on industrial history. There is so much happening today in terms of scientific and technological advancement that a good scientific overview will be tremendously valuable. Many authors like Burke, Sagan, and the rest do a good job at explaining science in laymans terms that will not be overly soporific or too dense for most of us.

wait4me6920
08-19-07, 01:20 PM
Wait... do service manuals count?! :D

Not sure - never asked one....:rofl:

Spyder
08-19-07, 05:58 PM
JimHare...I'm always picking up books like that, that are interesting and educational. I'm in the middle of about four different history/psychology/science/etc ones. I'm just looking for fiction to fill the spaces. :)

Rolex
08-19-07, 09:15 PM
About 90% of what I read is non-fiction.

:yeah: I constantly read anesthesia articles, research, case studies, journals, and like a daily diet of local newspaper and USA Today paper. If I had the time I'd rather read news online than in a paper. I just dislike reading for entertainment....the exact opposite of my wife.

z06bigbird
08-20-07, 03:02 PM
So, I'm on a reading kick again. I used to read A BUNCH when I was a kid...HUNDREDS of books a year. I had the record for the most books checked out from the local library per month for years running. Now, since i started college, I've dropped off. I've been itching to get back into it lately and have slowly been doing it, but every time I go to the damned Barnes and Noble I can't find what I want.

Lately it's been 20,000 leagues under the sea, ginger man by jp donleavy, white lines, which is a collection of pieces by famous writers on cocaine, a bunch of hunter thompson stuff, and I'm currently in The Wave, about a high school class nazism experiment in 1969. I just ordered Catch-22 and was looking at some Faulkner and Hemmingway, but couldn't decide. I tried to read Hocus Pocus by...damnitt...the author is skipping my brain. Well known, wrote a BUNCH of super popular stuff, he's a 'jr.'... but I just couldn't get into it. Under and Alone by William Queen was awesome. Cannonball, Brock Yates, great. I've got all three thompson biographies, the michael jordan biography, The Turner Diaries, The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Last Of The Really Great Whangdoodles.

Examples of what I've liked in the past...Steven King, I actually like a LOT of his stuff. The Dark Tower series was AMAZING. C.S. Friedmans Coldfire trilogy was was the best I've ever read. I read a lot of fantasy, little bit of sci-fi and a lot of Tom Clancy, Dale Brown, etc. type stuff.
..but I'm not limiting my new scope to anything at all.

Recommend title, author, genre, anything. Just tell me some examples and WHY and I'll see what I can do about getting it done.

That's the problem with going to school. All of a sudden you are smarter than everybody else, and you don't want to read any more. Just kidding.

I have tried to keep my kids (28 and 30) from reading and learning. That way I have fewer problems with them.

For books, I recommend shop manuals on all Cadillacs.

I~LUV~Caddys8792
08-20-07, 05:35 PM
Aside from 1971,73-75, 77, and 1988, I have every Cadillac full line brochure from 1968-1995. Those make for some good bathroom/bedtime reading.

c5 rv
08-20-07, 09:49 PM
Harry Turtledove, Guns of the South followed by the 11 books of the Timeline 191 series. Turtledove holds a PhD in history and was well known as a fantasy author. Guns... was in his traditional style, the Civil War meets time travel. The 11 book 191 series (also called the Southern Victory series) is excellent alternative history with no fantasy. How Few Remain starts the series and is about the second Civil War in the 1880s. The rest of the series takes you though WWI, the time between the wars, and WWII where the USA and CSA do battle with each other, on opposite sides of global conflicts. The last book in the series, In at the Death was just published in hardcover (I'm just about done with it.)

Starting with WWI in The Great War, American Front, Turtledove tells the historical tale through the advertures of about 12-15 parallel story lines with characters and families that span generations. Some storylines overlap, some spawn new storylines, and others are allowed to die over about 30 years from the 1910s to 1940s.

wait4me6920
08-20-07, 10:49 PM
Couple other thoughts - Jack Kerouac's On the Road is classic nonfiction worth reading.

William Least Heat-Moon's trilogy - Blue Highways, PrairyErth & River Horse are also excellent insights into what was going on away from the hustle/bustle of city life some thirty or so years after Kerouac traveled about.