: Brake Even More Stuck!



DopeStar 156
08-13-07, 03:42 PM
The front passenger brake on my 76 DeVille is now even more stuck than it was before. It's now stuck all the time. I'm guessing a line collapsed? Anyone have any ideas as to why it's now permanantly stuck?

Mud
08-13-07, 03:59 PM
I assume that the brake pedal is OK, but that the front caliper is stuck? Sorry if I missed a previous post on this.

Yes, it could be a collapsed hose, but I would suspect a bad caliper first. Of course, if the hoses are original or old, I would replace for safety's sake regardless of the cause. A collapsed hose or corroded brake line can prevent the fluid pressure from slightly "backing off" when you take your foot off of the pedal.

If both calipers were stuck I would look at the proportioning valve or the residual pressure valve in the master cylinder (translation - get a new master cylinder).

jayoldschool
08-13-07, 05:42 PM
Either the caliper piston is stuck, or the caliper is hung up on the sliders (more likely). Just take off the caliper after compressing the piston back into the bore with a BIG C clamp, then clean and lube the sliders. You can get a slider kit at any parts place, too. You can check to see if the caliper piston is working when the caliper is off the rotor by putting a block of wood in there for the caliper to clamp onto (don't let the piston come all the way out!). Then, get some one to step on the brakes while you look. Do this before re-doing the sliders, btw. If the piston isn't moving, just get a rebuilt caliper. It will come with all new slider stuff, anyways.

LMK if you have more questions
Jason.

DopeStar 156
08-14-07, 01:55 AM
I'll have to check that out. I have the brake hardware just no lube. The pedal is fine, just the one brake sticks.....

z06bigbird
08-14-07, 11:28 AM
The older models up north frequently get corroded from road salt supposedly--typically the pass side.

Brother_B
08-14-07, 09:00 PM
Mine did this. I replaced just the rubber part of the line going to the caliper and that fixed it. The rubber line can deteriorate on the inside and cause a blockage. When you apply the brake, fluid can go OUT to the caliper but it can't get back. If this is your problem, you are very lucky - $15 repair.

DopeStar 156
08-15-07, 02:12 AM
Mine did this. I replaced just the rubber part of the line going to the caliper and that fixed it. The rubber line can deteriorate on the inside and cause a blockage. When you apply the brake, fluid can go OUT to the caliper but it can't get back. If this is your problem, you are very lucky - $15 repair.

Cool! After the brake hardware, this will be the second thing I try. Thanks a lot.....

I would have to bleed the lines too huh? How do you bleed brakes?

derrty_deville
08-15-07, 02:26 AM
Get a piece of clear hose (1/8" IIRC) and a lighter. Light one end of the hose and put it on the bleeder screw. Open the bleeder screw and have someone pump the brakes till the air bubbles stop. Have the pedal held down and close the bleeder screw.

5 minute yob.

Mud
08-15-07, 07:24 AM
You can simply gravity bleed the brakes if there's not another person or lighter available.

Gravity bleeding takes a little longer but it works fine. I have a couple of cars that use silicone brake fluid to avoid paint issues on restored undercarriages and no matter what else I do/use, I always finish by gravity bleeding to ensure all the small air bubbles are out of the system. Silicone fluid is a pain to bleed thoroughly.

But I digress, not interested in getting into pros/cons of different fluids. Open the bleed screw at each caliper, crack the top of the master cylinder loose and just let it drip. Be sure that you don't let the master cylinder reservoir run dry. Have a beverage and just watch it drip for a while, then close the bleeder, top off the reservoir and pump up the brakes a bit with the pedal to get the caliper pistons positioned, they may have retracted a little.

DopeStar 156
08-15-07, 01:35 PM
Get a piece of clear hose (1/8" IIRC) and a lighter. Light one end of the hose and put it on the bleeder screw. Open the bleeder screw and have someone pump the brakes till the air bubbles stop. Have the pedal held down and close the bleeder screw.

5 minute yob.

Sounds pretty simple. I guess lighting the end of the hose causes a vacuum, no?

DaveSmed
08-19-07, 10:22 PM
Nah it would just make the hose more pliable. To check if it is the rubber brake hose, get it good and stuck and just crack the bleeder. if its holding pressure, you'll know, and the brake will also release. If nothing really comes out, or if it just dribbles and the brakes stay engaged, calipers stuck.