: '93-96 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham Gas Pedal /Traction Control



Cadillacboy
07-17-07, 11:15 AM
I noticed that my Fleetwood Brougham's traction control system works wayyyyy different than other Cadillacs I have ever driven .So, when you push the gas pedal down w/o flooring and traction is on ,my gas pedal goes forward on its own and then back to where it is after traction is off .
So, is it all about RWD vs FWD thingy or my '96 has a all different traction system .

caddycruiser
07-17-07, 09:34 PM
With both a '93 and '95, all mine do is push back against you to kill the throttle when traction kicks on, and then stop when it's done. Not sure what you mean by making it go in when it's on...unless something changed, or your car is just weird. Technically, increasing throttle application would be the opposite of what's wanted...

Cadillacboy
07-18-07, 05:41 PM
Thanks for your the explanation .I think all RWD FWBs work same way and quite different to FWD cars .

caddycruiser
07-18-07, 08:02 PM
Actually, no, I know of many (regardless of FWD/RWD/AWD) that all work the same way. Most will kill the gas back a bit like the Caddy (cable linked systems actually pushing back, and newer electronic throttles just electronically retarding it), and also most unlike the Fleetwood's older system apply the brakes to the spinning wheels.

All in all, the Cadillac's system is okay, but archaic like the car, and tends to also be oversensitive. It's actually helped me out a few times in slick driving, but for the most part, a regular locking rear diff (i.e. -posi) axle might have been a better choice instead of or on top of it, like the Buick and Chevy's of the same underpinnings had (and with no traction system).

Cadillacboy
07-19-07, 06:39 AM
Definitely agreed on the oversensitive issue .When making comparions between my FWD and Seville , I have to say Seville's system works more efficiently but still FWB's is ok .
When flooring the FWB , I feel my gas pedal push against me unlike Seville .

caddycruiser
07-19-07, 10:32 PM
Yep, even if just a little, it tries to kick in and kill the acceleration you're pressing for, to theoretically keep the car in control.

On this note, you also must remember, these big, heavy cars were made with floppy road manners, and setup with low friction road cruising tires for older folks...hence, for their driving, the traction control is perfect. Anyone else, and more typical or aggressive driving, it feels like overkill to some.

z06bigbird
07-19-07, 10:36 PM
Yep, even if just a little, it tries to kick in and kill the acceleration you're pressing for, to theoretically keep the car in control.

On this note, you also must remember, these big, heavy cars were made with floppy road manners, and setup with low friction road cruising tires for older folks...hence, for their driving, the traction control is perfect. Anyone else, and more typical or aggressive driving, it feels like overkill to some.

Be careful who you are calling older folks!

caddycruiser
07-20-07, 11:08 PM
Be careful who you are calling older folks!

Oh, I know, no harm done. I was 20 when I bought mine...but when they were new, 95% of people who bought them (and had bought them for decades) were of the older, retired, Boca group.

Hence, the soft suspension, boulevard tires, traction control, etc. They're easily transformed cars, but there's also a clear reason why certain things like the TC were set up the way they were.

It's a common complaint, especially with how the power the cars have leads them to be driven, even if unintentially. Despite my high performance, can't unstick them for nothing 17" tires (no affect on how it's still set up, but worth mentioning), for instance, pulling onto the highway today as usual, need to get going and go light at first jab just because I know what will happen, then hit it, only to get the wonderful light and the gas fighting back at me...I understand the purpose, but boy does that get old...

Then again, not much different than a LOT of other even recent traction control systems. The idea is to maintain traction, but most still go overboard in terms of basic intentions to get moving, hence "off" settings and switches, but it's still a fact of driving. Oh well.

Another reason why, also, a lot of people who have done center console conversions relocate the OEM glove box off switch (which never can be just left turned off) to easy reach, for ritual flicks off on start up.

96Fleetwood
07-21-07, 09:44 AM
Occasionally when I want to drive aggressively, I turn to the girlfriend and say "could you turn it off babe?" She then proceeds to open the glove box and turn off the T/C... and I leave a cloud of smoke from both rear tires all through second gear... :thumbsup: ... these Dunlops really can take a beating!

But for days when she is not in the car, I have to reach over and fumble to find that dern switch :mad:

It is annoying at times, the way it blips the throttle and hampers any kind of aggressive driving.. but I am glad it is there because I am sure there will be a time I will make a mistake and the T/C could possibly hamper it getting ugly.

Cadillacboy
07-21-07, 11:26 AM
It's not within reach just like my Seville .I reckon they intentionally put the button lest some people mess up with it lol .
BTW, trunk release button is in the glove box whereas they could have put it somewhere around the console .Glad, remote transmitter works nicely :thumbsup:
Even with the goodyear tires in other words not a high performance tires , the car is really so powerful and I feel it when I push a bit the pedal :bouncy:

ShadowLvr400
07-21-07, 02:42 PM
I turn the system off every time I drive. Get in the car, fire it up, reach over and flip off TC, reach down and manually release the parking brake, seatbelt, ac, radio, etc. Gives the engine a minute to move the oil around, warm up a moment, etc. I don't have to look to turn off TC anymore.

Oh yea, I've converted to a Posi setup.

N0DIH
07-21-07, 10:34 PM
I have a non Fleetwood axle in mine now with a 3.08's and a posi (tight one at that) and LOVE it. I don't miss TC at all, but I do miss ABS... But I should be getting to work on my Fleetwood axle soon..... Posi 3.42's soon!!

The BIG advantage of the posi over open diff is you have both wheels pushing the car, not just the one with the least traction. It may not seem like much, but it has made a large difference in how my car drives. I love it. The open differential primarily puts the power into the OUTSIDE wheel, this is the one that is turning faster, so it is the one with the least traction. The posi is biasing both wheels together, and it is putting power into both wheels and the wheel moving the slowest will push the car harder than the wheel on the outside, so the car will accelerate faster than an open, all things being equal.

So posi IS worth it, worth every dime.

96Fleetwood
07-21-07, 11:17 PM
So posi IS worth it, worth every dime.

One of the best mods I did to my car, 3.73 with Eaton Posi... but it was costly! Around $1K installed :eek: Cost me more than my wagon!

N0DIH
07-21-07, 11:29 PM
Yup, not cheap! I have a fairly low miles Eaton Posi out of my 96 Suburban that I am going to rebuild and toss my 3.42's and get it back in my car. I have brand new GM axles ready too.

Ok, the downside. You enjoy it so much and end up wearing out your tires quickly!

I talked to B_Body_LT1 today and he pulled his 3.73's out to put 3.08's back in (whole axle swap) and he hated the 3.73's because the cruise rpms at higher speeds were too high. Here I am pondering 3.90's if I have to replace my 3.42's due to high wear. Hmmm.....

3.08's @ 75 mph = 2000 rpm
3.42's @ 75 mph = 2200 rpm
3.73's @ 75 mph = 2400 rpm
3.90's @ 75 mph = 2500 rpm

My thoughts if I were to go to 3.73 you might as well step up to 3.90's.... 3.55's aren't available in the 8.5/8.6 10 bolt, neither are 3.64's anymore (they were a special only for Buick GSX 455's...)

I don't see 75 for any extended time, and I don't go over that much at all, only for very brief times. But I do see a LOT of time in the 30-55 range. So having more gear would (should) lead to a better driving experience.