: Obsolesence of the 307.



Gwokable
05-31-07, 09:25 PM
I recently did a rebuild on the engine in my Caddy, and looking at it in 5 years from now when maintenance will be an issue, I've found a number of parts and specialized tools are no longer made, are expensive as fsck to get your hands on, or can only be had in a junkyard. Simply put, the engine management system on this car is old and in need of replacement.

In short, what mods have been done on this car to get a bigger fuel injected engine in there? Are there fuel injection kits that are recent for the 307 that have settings for the brougham?

Johnny Bravo
06-01-07, 02:21 AM
I recently did a rebuild on the engine in my Caddy, and looking at it in 5 years from now when maintenance will be an issue, I've found a number of parts and specialized tools are no longer made, are expensive as fsck to get your hands on, or can only be had in a junkyard. Simply put, the engine management system on this car is old and in need of replacement.

In short, what mods have been done on this car to get a bigger fuel injected engine in there? Are there fuel injection kits that are recent for the 307 that have settings for the brougham?
Exactly what are these "specialized tools and parts" you're talking about? :confused:

The 307 has a fairly simple CCC system that works quite well with little maintenance. It consists of the ECM itself, (which rarely fails), electronic feedback Q-jet carb, distributor, O2 sensor, and a few other miscellaneous items. That is about all there is to the "engine management system". A similar system was also used on the Chevy small block before it went to fuel injection.

All of the above parts are commonly and inexpensively available, either through GM or aftermarket and will be for quite some time to come.
Far from being obsolete, millions of GM vehicles used the Olds 307 engine up to 1990. Furthermore, many 307 parts are interchangable with the other Olds small blocks going back to 1964.:holycrap:

If you wanted a bigger engine you should have put in a rebuilt Olds 350 instead of the 307.

Gwokable
06-01-07, 06:23 PM
Find me a new Idle Load Compensator or an Anti Dieseling Solenoid and I'll bow down and worship you as a god. :x

I got a dealer service manual; lots of tools in there are unavailable. Or am I failing because I'm doing something wrong?

TexasCadillac
06-02-07, 03:35 AM
what Johnny Bravo said...If you wanted a bigger engine you should have put in a rebuilt Olds 350 instead of the 307...I had a 307 in a 71 Pontiac Ventura witha 307, I put in a 327 Chevy it with a 2 speed powerglide. The 307 had lower power and really used a lot of gas too. No kidding get a 350 if you can. Texascadillac

Johnny Bravo
06-03-07, 01:02 AM
Find me a new Idle Load Compensator or an Anti Dieseling Solenoid and I'll bow down and worship you as a god. :x

I got a dealer service manual; lots of tools in there are unavailable. Or am I failing because I'm doing something wrong?
Is this what you're looking for?:
http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductDetail.aspx?MfrCode=GPS&MfrPartNumber=7791997&PartType=904&PTSet=A

Concerning tools. Yes, there are often references to certain specialized tools in the service manual, but most are available for purchase or loan from well stocked auto parts stores, Sears, etc.

Check out http://oldspower.comif you have more 307 questions.

By the way, nothing wrong with junkyard parts. Getting familiar with the local J-yard is a fact of life when driving a 19 year old car. :Poke:

joe_padavano
06-03-07, 10:20 AM
what Johnny Bravo said...If you wanted a bigger engine you should have put in a rebuilt Olds 350 instead of the 307...I had a 307 in a 71 Pontiac Ventura witha 307, I put in a 327 Chevy it with a 2 speed powerglide. The 307 had lower power and really used a lot of gas too. No kidding get a 350 if you can. Texascadillac

Just so we're clear, the 307 in that Ventura (and in many early 70s Chevies) is a small block Chevy motor. The 80s 307 is an Olds motor with nothing in common. It uses completely different castings and has completely different bore, stroke, bore spacing, bearings, etc.

Gwokable
06-03-07, 03:51 PM
Is this what you're looking for?:
http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductDetail.aspx?MfrCode=GPS&MfrPartNumber=7791997&PartType=904&PTSet=A

Concerning tools. Yes, there are often references to certain specialized tools in the service manual, but most are available for purchase or loan from well stocked auto parts stores, Sears, etc.

Check out http://oldspower.comif you have more 307 questions.

By the way, nothing wrong with junkyard parts. Getting familiar with the local J-yard is a fact of life when driving a 19 year old car. :Poke:

The one I need is the vacuum operated one. :x The solenoid one is easy to find. The mechanic I'm having do the rebuild on the carb can't even find it.

Johnny Bravo
06-04-07, 05:05 PM
The one I need is the vacuum operated one. :x The solenoid one is easy to find. The mechanic I'm having do the rebuild on the carb can't even find it.
In that case, try the junkyard, 307 powered vehicles are usually plentiful. Or, find another mechanic or send the carb out to a professional rebuilder.

3141592654
07-03-07, 09:10 AM
...pitch the Olds 307 in the weeds! I just put a Chevy 454 (now 468) cid engine in my 1988 Brougham. Runs like a champ! If you are going to put another 5.0 liter (or 5.7 liter, a better choice) engine into your Caddy, I would go with a Chevy. If you have the TH 2004R tranny, any GM engine will bolt up to it, becauce the 2004R came in the "Unicase" version for these cars. In this time frame, Caddy was having so many problems with their own engines that they were scambling for an answer. At first they used the Olds 307, but then quickly changed to the Chevy small blocks.

I have a friend who has a 1992 Brougham with a fuel injected Chevy 350 cid. The horsepower he gets with his engine compared to my former (anemic, aspirated) Olds 307 is phenominal!

I would encourage you to look at the Chevy engines for future upgrades. MUCH more common than the Olds and, therefore, many more aftermarket parts, tools, and equipment. This yields a much cheaper engine to maintain!

Go luck, Bro!

3141592654

davedbusman
07-09-07, 12:44 AM
Got a Chevy 305 with throttle body injection in my Caddy. I've owned 3 cars with the Olds 307 and the Chevy beats them, hands down. Easier and cheaper to get parts for Chevy too since everyone uses them for racing.

In your case since you just rebuilt the 307 maybe you should just trash the electronic quadrajet and put in an old school carb and distributor with MSD ignition. Summit Racing has combinations for a reasonable price. A friend of mine did this and is getting a lot more power out of his 130K mile 307.

MadCaddie69
08-11-07, 11:54 AM
I think Edelbrock makes an aftermaket fuel injection for the 307. I don't know if it's still available.

joe_padavano
08-13-07, 06:27 PM
I think Edelbrock makes an aftermaket fuel injection for the 307. I don't know if it's still available.

I don't think so. The only EFI systems specifically designed for Olds motors are geared mainly towards the 455 and 403 motors in the GMC motorhomes. Howell and Rance are the two that come to mind. Neither are cheap.

Edelbrock, Holley, and others sell generic throttle body EFI systems that bolt to 4bbl carbs. These will not be emissions legal on a 307 if you have those requirements where you live.

People have installed the TBI setup from a 305 Chevy on the 307 Olds with success. You need the computer, sensors, etc. from the 305. You also need a throttle body adapter plate, but these are available from several sources. This lets you bolt the throttle body to a Qjet intake. The 305 and 307 are close enough that the stock 305 computer will work for mild motors. Any mods usually requires a custom PROM.