: Doing a half case reseal myself?



pimpin88
04-01-07, 06:08 PM
Well, before I talk about doing it, let me ask a few questions.

What is an AFTER warrenty claim (goodwill, continuing claim)?

How can I find out if my car still has a warranty on it? (87,800 miles and I bought it privately) If I called up GM would they be able to find out?

How bad can it be leaking before I should be worried about replacing it? (The pan is wet and there are a few drips)


Now, how feasible is it that I do this reseal myself. I have a garage I can work in, a good number of tools at my house, access to many more at my neighbors and can buy whatever I don't have. I also have the Factory Service Manuals for the 2001 Seville, and I have done a fair amount of work on cars. (Swapped the cam in my Brougham and swapped the engine in my Roadmaster followed by a transmission swap because I lost 3rd and 4th gear.)

I have been reading extensively about this problem and would like some insight from others without all the bickering that has happened in other threads. There are a few members here whom a value their knowledge of the N* very greatly and will probably go with their advice, but I will read and think about all posts.

Please just post your opinion/what you know about the topic and dont try to fight other people off.

Thanks so much guys,

Andrew

Ranger
04-01-07, 07:04 PM
Unless the car was certified (6yr/100K) it is out of warranty. Even if it is certified, it is 6 yrs old now, so it would be close, depending on the actual in service date. Any GM dealer should be able to tell you just by the VIN number.

To reseal the halfcase, you need to drop the cradle, seperate the engine & trans (I believe) and then split the case. That would also mean replacing the main bearings as they cannot be reused. If I recall correctly the dealers get somwhere around 20 hrs to do the job (though I am sure THEY can beat that). Personally, I would not attempt it unless it was really dripping badly, unless it was under warranty.

ewill3rd
04-02-07, 06:22 AM
Goodwill or not is up to the dealer. The SMs have more power than they used to but at 80 on the clock I doubt they will step up unless this thing is leaking badly.
If it is not dripping on the floor don't look for much in the way of assistance.

As for doing it yourself, it shouldn't be a problem if you are mechanically inclined. Be aware that you must remove the engine or the transmission from the car. Based on your description of your shop I'd say you are going to have to pull the engine and flip it over to work on it.
Do you have an engine stand?

You will also need a torque angle meter and there is a revised procedure for resealing the lower crankcase that uses RTV instead of the anerobic sealer they used to use. You have to be cautious so you don't block oil passages with the sealer.

It can be quite a job if you have never done it before.
I only did it once or twice, although guys in our heavy duty shop do them fairly often. (I don't like that kind of worK)

I agree with Ranger, unless this thing is really leaking, I wouldn't do it. it is a lot of work for what is likely a pretty small leak or "seepage".

There shouldn't be a problem reusing the engine bearings if you are careful.
Just keep your work area clean, maybe pour some oil on the crankshaft journals before you set the lower crankcase half on.

I can answer more questions later, mayhem is breaking out here.

pimpin88
04-02-07, 11:38 AM
Goodwill or not is up to the dealer. The SMs have more power than they used to but at 80 on the clock I doubt they will step up unless this thing is leaking badly.
If it is not dripping on the floor don't look for much in the way of assistance.




I parked it in my driveway at about noon on saturday and when I moved it around noon on sunday there were probably four spots on the driveway where it had dripped.

After going underneath the car yesterday and trying to look at it closely I am not so sure that it is in fact the half case. I was going off of what the mechanic who looked at my car said. I wiped everything down last night so I will go under it again today to try and pinpoint where it is coming from. I am fairly certain that the drain plug is part of the problem and is quite possible because the guy I bought it from said he had the oil changed right before I bought it.

The sides of the oil pan had grit on them but very little to no oil at all. Again, I'm not sure if this is because the oil drips down to the oil pan, or if it just isnt leaking from the half case. Below the half case seal looks pretty dry, so right now I can only hope for the best. We'll see what happens when I get home.

Ranger
04-02-07, 08:44 PM
Where exactly are the drips? The oil filter adapter and or the oil pressure switch are common leak points that are easily and cheaply repaired.

ewill3rd
04-03-07, 06:05 AM
Yeah, I would say the first thing to look at is the oil pressure sending unit.

pimpin88
04-03-07, 06:18 AM
Crawled under there again last night and tightened up the oil drain plug, so that isnt dripping any longer, but while I was under there I had someone start the car and watched the half case, sure enough, it's leaking on the front. The back is totally dry.

After thinking about it, should I just let it go and if the engine ever dies just get another engine for it. I mean, if there is the chance that the engine will have no problems, just leak for a little bit for the rest of its life, is it really worth pulling out an 87,000 mile engine to fix it or should I just let it go and when/if it dies replace with another one.

Ranger
04-03-07, 10:30 AM
The choice is yours, but that is an awful lot of work for a little seepage. Leaving it as is will not cause any mechanical problems or early engine demise.

clarkz71
04-04-07, 11:24 AM
The choice is yours, but that is an awful lot of work for a little seepage. Leaving it as is will not cause any mechanical problems or early engine demise.

I agree.:yup: