: North* Air Pump



Ekindler0584
03-10-07, 10:23 AM
Would anyone see a problem with removing the air pump from a 2001 seville. (Emissions not being a concern). Getting stainless steel caps for the exhaust manifolds is not a problem for me...

My father did this on his '94 Vette to prevent the hot exhaust from being recirculated into the engine.

Any thoughts???


Thanks, :thumbsup:
Ed

JimD
03-10-07, 12:45 PM
You could be confused about the operation of the Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system on the Northstar. The AIR system does not have anything to do with EGR.

The AIR pump on the Northstar injects air under pressure into the exhaust manifolds when the engine is in open loop operation.

Don't see any benefit to you to remove it. And the PCM is sure to set codes and Service Engine light if you remove or disable it.

Ranger
03-10-07, 04:39 PM
Don't see any benefit to you to remove it. And the PCM is sure to set codes and Service Engine light if you remove or disable it.

Likewise with the EGR.

FrankT
03-11-07, 09:31 AM
I agree with Jim D and Ranger, no benefits, you will set codes and illuminate the MIL, also I think you have EGR and AIR systems confused.

Ekindler0584
03-11-07, 11:46 AM
I did have them confused! I was discussing the EGR valve with some one else while typing my post...

What I was thinking was to remove the AIR system, cap the inlet from the AIR system to the headers, and wrap the headers with (fiberglass probably) heat shielding. All to help reduce under-hood heat.

Does anyone know if the AIR system runs only at startup? Or regularly?

Thanks,
Ed

FrankT
03-11-07, 01:19 PM
The AIR pump runs only on a cold start when the Engine Coolant temps and Intake Air temps are within a the calibrated range. It only runs for approx 20 seconds. It will warm the cat up a little sooner, has nothing to do with engine temps only exhaust. I don't see it helping you with what you are after. If you go ahead and perform this mod, you will live the MIL ON.

Ranger
03-11-07, 04:05 PM
Why are you concerned with under hood temps anyway?

Mountie
03-12-07, 02:50 AM
Wrapping exhaust will muck up the sensors..(?)....Try shielding surfaces near the exhaust, if that's your reason. I wrapped the wire harness with heat shielding, and make sure the wiring is rigged properly away from warm surfaces.

The North* is already high performance....... you seem to attempt a lot of work for little results? In my opinion.

Ekindler0584
03-12-07, 10:25 AM
Because working on my caddy brings me great joy!?!? Come on now... I can't be the only one here who actually enjoys working one their car... Am I? :confused:

Really though... In any car, underhood heat can (sometimes significantly) decrease performance. Just a thought I had. I may try disconnecting the power to the air pump for a day or two to see if i get a code on it. If not I may go ahead and do it for shits and giggles. I can get the stainless steel caps fabricated for under $60.

ewill3rd
03-12-07, 12:39 PM
Disconnecting the AIR system will cause the MIL to come on. The computer commands the pump on and monitors for a drop in O2 sensor voltage under certain conditions which identifies the fresh airflow into the exhaust.
The AIR pump only runs on cold start up and during PCM controlled self diagnostic routines.
Disconnecting EGR, AIR or any other emission system on your vehicle is a violation of Federal Law, period. While it is doubtful that you'll get caught it is a $2,500 fine per vehicle. (Probably not a good idea to advertise on the web.)

There is no benefit in removing the AIR system, in fact the AIR system actually helps the car. It will do less than nothing as far as lowering underhood temperatures.
Disconnecting the EGR system will make the car run badly and ping like crazy also.
You can leave the systems as they are for free.
I'd say most guys here like working on their cars... or they would pretty much not be here.

Mountie
03-12-07, 12:58 PM
Because working on my caddy brings me great joy!?!? Come on now... I can't be the only one here who actually enjoys working one their car... Am I? :confused:

Really though... In any car, underhood heat can (sometimes significantly) decrease performance. Just a thought I had. I may try disconnecting the power to the air pump for a day or two to see if i get a code on it. If not I may go ahead and do it for shits and giggles. I can get the stainless steel caps fabricated for under $60.

I, ( as others) also love working on these 'high-tech' V8's. My only thought is the North* is extremly well designed & supported by it's computer. My 'work' has been making sure all the external parts are performing up to the needs of the engine its'self. Changing what already is good, may complicate the engine's running.

I have learned from way back that the best running car is making everything simple....and THAT makes the car run at it's best.

jadcock
03-13-07, 07:26 AM
Because working on my caddy brings me great joy!?!? Come on now... I can't be the only one here who actually enjoys working one their car... Am I? :confused:

No you're not (the only one who enjoys working on his car). But there's a difference between "working on the car" and "re-engineering for degraded performance". It's been the collective experience of a LOT of people on here that in most cases, you do more harm than good when you start modifying things on these cars. They're not Hondas or Toyotas. They're thoroughly engineered from the factory and provide best performance under all conditions when left alone.

Sure, you can do the normal stuff like changing out mufflers and things like that, but trying to re-engineer an emission component that doesn't really negatively affect the vehicle at all isn't productive.

Besides, if you wanted to wrap the exhaust manifolds, why does the air system plumbing stop you? Just wrap around it. It's no different from wrapping around the O2 sensor and similar "obstructions".

Ekindler0584
03-13-07, 09:25 AM
Alright everyone... it was a rhetorical question!!! No need to get offended. I know you love your lac's just as much as i do! :)


My thinking was that when the AIR system is not running, hot exhaust is pumped into the lines, towards the air pump. You can verify this by thouching the air system hoses while the car is running. (and as a disclaimer, i take no responsibility for burnt hands!) By removing these lines (which radiate heat), capping the inlets on the manifold, and wrapping the manifold with heat shielding... I could reduce a decent amount of engine heat.

ewill3rd
03-13-07, 09:58 AM
The exhaust does not run through the lines. There are check valves in place to keep that from happening.
They are not giving off heat from the exhaust system, they are absorbing heat from the other components in the engine compartment.
That is why they are hot to the touch. Touch anything under there, it is hot.
The engine block is approximately 400 degrees and the things around it soak up the heat.